tribulation


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Wikipedia.
Related to tribulation: rapture, Pre Tribulation

trib·u·la·tion

 (trĭb′yə-lā′shən)
n.
1. Great affliction, trial, or distress; suffering: a time of great tribulation. See Synonyms at trial.
2. An experience that tests one's endurance, patience, or faith. See Synonyms at burden.

[Middle English tribulacioun, from Old French tribulacion, from Latin trībulātiō, trībulātiōn-, from trībulātus, past participle of trībulāre, to oppress, from Latin trībulum, threshing-sledge; see terə- in Indo-European roots.]

tribulation

(ˌtrɪbjʊˈleɪʃən)
n
1. a cause of distress
2. a state of suffering or distress
[C13: from Old French, from Church Latin trībulātiō, from Latin trībulāre to afflict, from trībulum a threshing board, from terere to rub]

trib•u•la•tion

(ˌtrɪb yəˈleɪ ʃən)

n.
1. grievous trouble; severe trial or suffering.
2. an instance of this; an affliction, trouble, or woe.
[1175–1225; Middle English < Late Latin trībulātiō distress, trouble = Latin tribulā(re) to squeeze, derivative of tribulum threshing sledge (trī, variant s. of terere to rub, crush + -bulum n. suffix of instrument)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tribulation - an annoying or frustrating or catastrophic eventtribulation - an annoying or frustrating or catastrophic event; "his mother-in-law's visits were a great trial for him"; "life is full of tribulations"; "a visitation of the plague"
affliction - a cause of great suffering and distress
fire - a severe trial; "he went through fire and damnation"

tribulation

tribulation

noun
1. Something hard to bear physically or emotionally:
2. A state of pain or anguish that tests one's resiliency and character:
Translations

tribulation

[ˌtrɪbjʊˈleɪʃən] N
1. (frm) → tribulación f
2. tribulationsaflicciones fpl

tribulation

[ˌtrɪbjʊˈleɪʃən] nmalheur m
trials and tribulations
the trials and tribulations of everyday life → les tribulations de la vie quotidienne

tribulation

nKummer m no pl; tribulationsSorgen pl; (less serious) → Kümmernisse pl; to bear one’s tribulations bravelysein Leid nttapfer tragen ? trial

tribulation

[ˌtrɪbjʊˈleɪʃn] n (frm) → tribolazione f
References in classic literature ?
It was": thus is the Will's teeth-gnashing and lonesomest tribulation called.
Occasionally, during the following month, I dropped in at 117 Wall Street to inquire how the repairing and refurnishing of the vessel was coming on, how additions to the passenger list were averaging, how many people the committee were decreeing not "select" every day and banishing in sorrow and tribulation.
year in and year out, rejoicing in hope, patient in tribulation.
The little schoolhouse on the hill had its moments of triumph as well as its scenes of tribulation, but it was fortunate that Rebecca had her books and her new acquaintances to keep her interested and occupied, or life would have gone heavily with her that first summer in Riverboro.
She used never to make any return to my affection before, but now tribulation has opened her heart.
He asked himself whether God was just in inflicting so much tribulation on two innocent creatures.
It was tribulation I sought at the bottom of it, tears and tribulation, and have found it, and I have tasted it; but He will pity us Who has had pity on all men, Who has understood all men and all things, He is the One, He too is the judge.
Amy was learning this distinction through much tribulation, for mistaking enthusiasm for inspiration, she attempted every branch of art with youthful audacity.
She was watching the motions of her father with a look of anxious and filial affection, while he paced the apartment with a dejected mien and disordered step; sometimes clasping his hands together sometimes casting his eyes to the roof of the apartment, as one who laboured under great mental tribulation.
This tempest and tribulation lasted about two hours, at the end of which he was left, not like his master, but so weak and exhausted that he could not stand.
For a moment the voices cheered the heart of Tess, till she reasoned that this interview had its origin, on one side or the other, in the same attraction which had been the prelude to her own tribulation.
I see," says the palmist, "a great deal of sorrow and tribulation with one whom ye cannot forget.