tricks


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

trick

 (trĭk)
n.
1.
a. An act or procedure intended to achieve an end by deceptive or fraudulent means. See Synonyms at wile.
b. A mischievous action; a prank: likes to play tricks on the other students in the dorm.
c. A stupid, disgraceful, or childish act: Don't let the kids pull any tricks while we're gone.
2.
a. A peculiar trait or characteristic; a mannerism: "Mimicry is the trick by which a moth or other defenseless insect comes to look like a wasp" (Marston Bates).
b. A peculiar event with unexpected, often deceptive results: "One of history's cruelest tricks is to take words that sounded good at the time and make them sound pretty stupid" (David Owen).
c. A deceptive or illusive appearance; an illusion: This painting plays tricks on the eyes.
3.
a. A special skill; a knack: Is there a trick to getting this window to stay up?
b. A convention or specialized skill peculiar to a particular field of activity: learned the tricks of the winemaking trade.
4.
a. A feat of magic or legerdemain.
b. A difficult, dexterous, or clever act designed to amuse: Does your dog do any tricks?
5. Games
a. All the cards played in a single round, one from each player.
b. One such round.
6.
a. A period or turn of duty, as at the helm of a ship.
b. Slang A prison term.
7. Slang
a. An act of prostitution.
b. A prostitute's customer.
c. A session carried out by a prostitute with a client.
8. Slang A robbery or theft.
tr. & intr.v. tricked, trick·ing, tricks
To cheat or deceive or to practice trickery or deception.
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or involving tricks.
2. Capable of performing tricks: a trick dog.
3. Designed or made for doing a trick or tricks: trick cards; trick dice.
4. Weak, defective, or liable to fail: a trick knee.
Phrasal Verb:
trick out (or up) Informal
To ornament or adorn, often garishly: was all tricked out in beads and fringe.
Idioms:
do/turn the trick
To bring about the desired result.
how's tricks Informal
Used to make a friendly inquiry about a person or that person's affairs.
not miss a trick
To be extremely alert: The teacher was known for not missing a trick.

[Middle English trik, from Old North French trique, from trikier, to deceive, probably from Vulgar Latin *triccāre, from Latin trīcārī, to play tricks, from trīcae, tricks.]

trick′er n.

tricks

  • snow park - An area of a piste, or ski trail, created for snowboarders and skiers to do tricks.
  • intricate - From Latin in-, "into," and tricae, "tricks, perplexities."
  • monkeyshines - A combination of monkey and shines, "capers, tricks."
  • whist - The game was originally called whisk, from "whisking away" the cards after the tricks had been taken.
References in classic literature ?
You are old enough to leave off boyish tricks, and to behave better, Josephine.
Well, of all the mean, contemptible tricks of a human skunk this is the limit
The minute supper was over, Otto took me into the kitchen to whisper to me about a pony down in the barn that had been bought for me at a sale; he had been riding him to find out whether he had any bad tricks, but he was a `perfect gentleman,' and his name was Dude.
The champagne was cold, and its subtle fumes played fantastic tricks with Edna's memory that night.
A certain cousin of his may have been at his old tricks.
Here, it is true, were none of the appliances which popular merriment would so readily have found in the England of Elizabeth's time, or that of James -- no rude shows of a theatrical kind; no minstrel, with his harp and legendary ballad, nor gleeman with an ape dancing to his music; no juggler, with his tricks of mimic witchcraft; no Merry Andrew, to stir up the multitude with jests, perhaps a hundred years old, but still effective, by their appeals to the very broadest sources of mirthful sympathy.
He was, in fact, noted for preferring vicious animals, given to all kinds of tricks which kept the rider in constant risk of his neck, for he held a tractable, wellbroken horse as unworthy of a lad of spirit.
It sufficiently stuck out that, by tacit little tricks in which even more than myself he carried out the care for my dignity, I had had to appeal to him to let me off straining to meet him on the ground of his true capacity.
Father Mapple enjoyed such a wide reputation for sincerity and sanctity, that I could not suspect him of courting notoriety by any mere tricks of the stage.
It's the old woman's tricks to be giving cobbling jobs.
And it was all perfectly regular--there were no tricks about it of any sort?
He don't amount to shucks, as a magician; knows some of the old common tricks, but has never got beyond the rudiments, and never will.