tricornered

Related to tricornered: Steeple hat

tri·cor·nered

 (trī′kôr′nərd)
adj.
Having three corners.

tri•cor•nered

(ˈtraɪˌkɔr nərd)

adj.
three-cornered; tricorn.
[1810–20]
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Crossing one another at various levels such that their occupants' limbs would overlap, the hammocks demarcated a tricornered interior in which a similarly triangular cup holder was suspended from the ceiling by strings.
I bought tricornered hats and quill pens and rolled up my pants into breeches so that I could dress up as my hero Thomas Jefferson, the author of the phrase "All men are created equal.
many of them brandishing slogans such as "Taxed Enough Already" and "Don't Tread on Me," and more than a few donning gold-rimmed tricornered hats, burst suddenly onto the stage of American politics.
I noticed then the ubiquity of Spain's military police, the Guardia Civil, with their distinctive tricornered hats and automatic weapons.
You might as well have guaranteed 18th-century citizens the right to wear jaunty tricornered hats.
Then there's Jay Bozievich, utility engineer, onetime Libertarian candidate for the Legislature, apostle of limited government, wearer of the tea party's tricornered hat.
Unshaven and dressed in jeans, an untucked button-down shirt, and hipster glasses, Boldin stood out from the crowd, which included the obligatory Tea Partier in a tricornered hat.
James Monroe was the last president to run unopposed for reelection--and, tellingly, the last to wear knee breeches, buckled shoes, powdered wig, and tricornered hat.
And by the end of the week I was struggling around in a special Venetian cape, covered with truco and a ridiculous tricornered hat.
I disagree with him but you gotta give him credit," said Victor Meyer, a delegate from Kent, Washington, wearing a tricornered hat and tights and standing on his tiptoes, straining to get a snapshot of himself with Nader.
It is a congested, polluted society filled with traffic jams, shopping malls, and anomic suburbs in which an eighteenth-century right to bear arms is as out of place as silk knee britches and tricornered hats.