tries


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tries

 (trīz)
v.
Third person singular present tense of try.
n.
Plural of try.

try

(traɪ)

v. tried, try•ing, v.t.
1. to attempt to do or accomplish: Try running a mile a day.
2. to test the effect or result of (often fol. by out): tried a new recipe.
3. to endeavor to evaluate by experiment or experience: to try a new field.
4. to sample, taste, or test, as in order to evaluate.
5. to examine and determine judicially, esp. to determine the guilt or innocence of (a person).
6. to put to a severe test; subject to strain, as of endurance: trying one's patience.
7. to attempt to open (a door, window, etc.) in order to find out whether it is locked.
8. to melt down (fat, blubber, etc.) to obtain the oil; render (usu. fol. by out).
9. Archaic. to determine the truth or right of (a quarrel or question) by test or battle.
v.i.
10. to make an attempt or effort; strive: You must try harder.
11. try on, to put on (an article of clothing) in order to judge its appearance and fit.
12. try out,
a. to test.
b. to compete for a position or role, as by taking part in a test or trial.
n.
13. an attempt or effort.
14. a score of usu. four points in rugby earned by advancing the ball to or beyond the opponent's goal line.
[1250–1300; Middle English trien to try (a legal case) < Anglo-French trier, Old French: to sift, cull]
usage.: The phrase try and is often used where try to is expected: Try and stop me. Though try and is found in all levels of speech and writing, it is sometimes considered inappropriate in formal contexts.
Translations

tries

pl de try
References in classic literature ?
If that woman does get out, and tries to get away, I can tie her!
he lifts his ineffectual hand, and tries the frame.
Jonah sees this; but in vain he tries to look all ease and confidence; in vain essays his wretched smile.
He tries to do it; he says he'll bring me down and humble me, and he puts me to just the hardest, meanest and dirtiest work, on purpose
As to ornament, there wasn't any, strictly speaking; though on the walls hung some huge tapes- tries which were probably taxed as works of art; battle-pieces, they were, with horses shaped like those which children cut out of paper or create in ginger- bread; with men on them in scale armor whose scales are represented by round holes -- so that the man's coat looks as if it had been done with a biscuit-punch.
Sometimes a bull is timid, finding himself in so strange a place, and he stands trembling, or tries to retreat.
And, mind you, when a girl tries to catch anything in her lap she throws her knees apart; she don't clap them together, the way you did when you catched the lump of lead.
A man who is not born with the novel-writing gift has a troublesome time of it when he tries to build a novel.
Everybody knows -- the widow, too, for all she tries to let on she don't.
Every body pretends to feel and tries to describe with the taste and elegance of him who first defined what picturesque beauty was.
And one knows it sometimes when one stands by oneself in a wood at sunset and the mysterious deep gold stillness slanting through and under the branches seems to be saying slowly again and again something one cannot quite hear, however much one tries.
A girl who takes the sharpest people unawares by using such a capacity as this to help her own objects in private life, and who sharpens that capacity by a determination to fight her way to her own purpose, which has beaten down everything before it, up to this time -- is a girl who tries an experiment in deception, new enough and dangerous enough to lead, one way or the other, to very serious results.