trifling


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tri·fling

 (trī′flĭng)
adj.
1. Of little worth or importance. See Synonyms at trivial.
2. Frivolous or foolish: "Mr. Knightly ... is not a trifling, silly young man" (Jane Austen).

tri′fling·ly adv.

trifling

(ˈtraɪflɪŋ)
adj
1. insignificant or petty
2. frivolous or idle
ˈtriflingly adv
ˈtriflingness n

tri•fling

(ˈtraɪ flɪŋ)

adj.
1. insignificant: a trifling sum.
2. frivolous; shallow; light.
[1350–1400]
syn: See petty.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.trifling - the deliberate act of delaying and playing instead of workingtrifling - the deliberate act of delaying and playing instead of working
delay, holdup - the act of delaying; inactivity resulting in something being put off until a later time
Adj.1.trifling - not worth considering; "he considered the prize too paltry for the lives it must cost"; "piffling efforts"; "a trifling matter"
worthless - lacking in usefulness or value; "a worthless idler"

trifling

trifling

adjective
Contemptibly unimportant:
Slang: measly.
Idiom: of no account.
Translations
تافِه، زَهيد
bezvýznamný
ubetydelig
smávægilegur

trifling

[ˈtraɪflɪŋ] ADJ (= insignificant) → sin importancia, frívolo

trifling

[ˈtraɪflɪŋ] adj [matter, details] → insignifiant(e)
the trifling sum of ten pounds
BUT la bagatelle de dix livres.

trifling

trifling

[ˈtraɪflɪŋ] adjinsignificante

trifle

(ˈtraifl) noun
1. anything of very little value. $100 is a trifle when one is very rich.
2. (a dish of) a sweet pudding made of sponge-cake, fruit, cream etc. I'm making a trifle for dessert.
ˈtrifling adjective
unimportant. a trifling amount of money.
References in classic literature ?
Could swim like a duck, paddled round the castle till he came to a little door guarded by two stout fellows, knocked their heads together till they cracked like a couple of nuts, then, by a trifling exertion of his prodigious strength, he smashed in the door, went up a pair of stone steps covered with dust a foot thick, toads as big as your fist, and spiders that would frighten you into hysterics, MIss March.
But the sounds of the rivulet, feeble and murmuring as they were, relieved the guides at once from no trifling embarrassment, and toward it they immediately held their way.
It would be an omission, trifling, indeed, but unpardonable, were we to forget the green moss that had long since gathered over the projections of the windows, and on the slopes of the roof nor must we fail to direct the reader's eye to a crop, not of weeds, but flower-shrubs, which were growing aloft in the air, not a great way from the chimney, in the nook between two of the gables.
The original and more potent causes, however, lay in the rare perfection of his animal nature, the moderate proportion of intellect, and the very trifling admixture of moral and spiritual ingredients; these latter qualities, indeed, being in barely enough measure to keep the old gentleman from walking on all-fours.
There was a gate in the fence, through which we passed, and that brought us, after a trifling interval, more into the open.
But as all my remonstrances produced no effect upon Queequeg, I was obliged to acquiesce; and accordingly prepared to set about this business with a determined rushing sort of energy and vigor, that should quickly settle that trifling little affair.
There could be no trifling in a case like this, it was a matter of life and death; little Stanislovas could not be expected to realize that he might a great deal better freeze in the snowdrift than lose his job at the lard machine.
Dear me, for what trifling offenses the most of those forty-seven men and women were shut up there
He merely pays a trifling fee of five or ten dollars, receives a card entitling him to the privileges of the university, and that is the end of it.
But by and by the thing dragged through, and everything was sold -- everything but a little old trifling lot in the graveyard.
Her income was only sufficient for the family support, and she needed the lodging money for trifling luxuries.
The jail was a trifling little brick den that stood in a marsh at the edge of the village, and no guards were afforded for it; indeed, it was seldom occupied.