trinket


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trin·ket

 (trĭng′kĭt)
n.
1. A small ornament, such as a piece of jewelry.
2. A trivial thing; a trifle.

[Origin unknown.]

trinket

(ˈtrɪŋkɪt)
n
1. a small or worthless ornament or piece of jewellery
2. a trivial object; trifle
[C16: perhaps from earlier trenket little knife, via Old Northern French, from Latin truncāre to lop]
ˈtrinketry n

trin•ket

(ˈtrɪŋ kɪt)

n.
1. a small ornament, piece of jewelry, etc., usu. of little value.
2. anything of trivial value.
[1525–35; orig. uncertain]

Trinket

 of corvisors: shoemakers collectively,—Bk. of St. Albans, 1486.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.trinket - cheap showy jewelry or ornament on clothingtrinket - cheap showy jewelry or ornament on clothing
adornment - a decoration of color or interest that is added to relieve plainness
trinketry - trinkets and other ornaments of dress collectively

trinket

noun ornament, bauble, knick-knack, piece of bric-a-brac, nothing, toy, trifle, bagatelle, gimcrack, gewgaw, bibelot, kickshaw She sold trinkets to tourists.

trinket

noun
Translations
حِلْيَه صَغيرَه رَخيصَه
bižuteriecetka
nips
bizsucsecsebecse
glingur, glysvarningur
blizgutis
lēts rotājumsnieciņš
bižutéria
incik boncukufak süs eşyası

trinket

[ˈtrɪŋkɪt] Nchuchería f, baratija f

trinket

[ˈtrɪŋkɪt] n
(= ornament) → bibelot m
(= piece of jewellery) → colifichet m

trinket

nSchmuckstück nt; (= ornament)Schmuckgegenstand m; the trinkets hanging from her braceletdie Anhänger an ihrem Armband

trinket

[ˈtrɪŋkɪt] n (piece of jewellery) → ciondolo; (ornament) → ninnolo, gingillo

trinket

(ˈtriŋkit) noun
a small (usually cheap) ornament or piece of jewellery. That shop sells postcards and trinkets.
References in classic literature ?
A cross is the last thing I would wear as a trinket.
Heathcliff had opened the trinket and cast out its contents, replacing them by a black lock of his own.
He cast a glance of tenderness and admiration into the interior of the precious pouch, readjusted his toilet, rubbed up his boots, dusted his poor half sleeves, all gray with ashes, whistled an air, indulged in a sportive pirouette, looked about to see whether there were not something more in the cell to take, gathered up here and there on the furnace some amulet in glass which might serve to bestow, in the guise of a trinket, on Isabeau la Thierrye, finally pushed open the door which his brother had left unfastened, as a last indulgence, and which he, in his turn, left open as a last piece of malice, and descended the circular staircase, skipping like a bird.
Were they made of gold they would look like trinkets, like ornamental toys, no bigger in proportion than a jewelled drop in a woman's ear.
He ended by indicating the stone in the yard off the Voznesensky Prospect under which the purse and the trinkets were found.
Under that, the miscellany began--a quadrant, a tin canikin, several sticks of tobacco, two brace of very handsome pistols, a piece of bar silver, an old Spanish watch and some other trinkets of little value and mostly of foreign make, a pair of compasses mounted with brass, and five or six curious West Indian shells.
Upon this river the Hudson's Bay Company have established a trading post, where the Pends Oreilles and the Flatheads bring their peltries to exchange for arms, clothing and trinkets.
Mynheer Boxtel went to the headsman, to whom he gave himself out as a great friend of the condemned man; and from whom he bought all the clothes of the dead man that was to be, for one hundred guilders; rather an exorbitant sum, as he engaged to leave all the trinkets of gold and silver to the executioner.
Broad-brimmed white hats and Panamas, blue-cotton trousers, light-colored stockings, cambric frills, were all here displayed; while upon shirt-fronts, wristbands, and neckties, upon every finger, even upon the very ears, they wore an assortment of rings, shirt-pins, brooches, and trinkets, of which the value only equaled the execrable taste.
The Indians, as yet unacquainted with the artificial value given to some descriptions of furs, in civilized life, brought quantities of the most precious kinds and bartered them away for European trinkets and cheap commodities.
There were her own trinkets and trousseau, in addition to those which her husband had left behind.
Glumdalclitch wrapped it up in her handkerchief, and carried it home in her pocket, to keep among other trinkets, of which the girl was very fond, as children at her age usually are.