trinket


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trin·ket

 (trĭng′kĭt)
n.
1. A small ornament, such as a piece of jewelry.
2. A trivial thing; a trifle.

[Origin unknown.]

trinket

(ˈtrɪŋkɪt)
n
1. a small or worthless ornament or piece of jewellery
2. a trivial object; trifle
[C16: perhaps from earlier trenket little knife, via Old Northern French, from Latin truncāre to lop]
ˈtrinketry n

trin•ket

(ˈtrɪŋ kɪt)

n.
1. a small ornament, piece of jewelry, etc., usu. of little value.
2. anything of trivial value.
[1525–35; orig. uncertain]

Trinket

 of corvisors: shoemakers collectively,—Bk. of St. Albans, 1486.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.trinket - cheap showy jewelry or ornament on clothingtrinket - cheap showy jewelry or ornament on clothing
adornment - a decoration of color or interest that is added to relieve plainness
trinketry - trinkets and other ornaments of dress collectively

trinket

noun ornament, bauble, knick-knack, piece of bric-a-brac, nothing, toy, trifle, bagatelle, gimcrack, gewgaw, bibelot, kickshaw She sold trinkets to tourists.

trinket

noun
Translations
حِلْيَه صَغيرَه رَخيصَه
bižuteriecetka
nips
bizsucsecsebecse
glingur, glysvarningur
blizgutis
lēts rotājumsnieciņš
bižutéria
incik boncukufak süs eşyası

trinket

[ˈtrɪŋkɪt] Nchuchería f, baratija f

trinket

[ˈtrɪŋkɪt] n
(= ornament) → bibelot m
(= piece of jewellery) → colifichet m

trinket

nSchmuckstück nt; (= ornament)Schmuckgegenstand m; the trinkets hanging from her braceletdie Anhänger an ihrem Armband

trinket

[ˈtrɪŋkɪt] n (piece of jewellery) → ciondolo; (ornament) → ninnolo, gingillo

trinket

(ˈtriŋkit) noun
a small (usually cheap) ornament or piece of jewellery. That shop sells postcards and trinkets.
References in classic literature ?
Heyward instantly knew it for a trinket that Alice was fond of wearing, and which he recollected, with the tenacious memory of a lover, to have seen, on the fatal morning of the massacre, dangling from the fair neck of his mistress.
It was very soon discovered that whoever cast an indignity on Topsy was sure to meet with some inconvenient accident shortly after;--either a pair of ear-rings or some cherished trinket would be missing, or an article of dress would be suddenly found utterly ruined, or the person would stumble accidently into a pail of hot water, or a libation of dirty slop would unaccountably deluge them from above when in full gala dress;-and on all these occasions, when investigation was made, there was nobody found to stand sponsor for the indignity.
Heathcliff had opened the trinket and cast out its contents, replacing them by a black lock of his own.
The few young girls whom he had met with, in his father's narrow circle at Zurich, had felt a mischievous pleasure in treating him like a quaint little plaything; the strongest impression he could make on their hearts was an impression in which their lap-dogs might have rivaled him; the deepest interest he could create in them was the interest they might have felt in a new trinket or a new dress.
He cast a glance of tenderness and admiration into the interior of the precious pouch, readjusted his toilet, rubbed up his boots, dusted his poor half sleeves, all gray with ashes, whistled an air, indulged in a sportive pirouette, looked about to see whether there were not something more in the cell to take, gathered up here and there on the furnace some amulet in glass which might serve to bestow, in the guise of a trinket, on Isabeau la Thierrye, finally pushed open the door which his brother had left unfastened, as a last indulgence, and which he, in his turn, left open as a last piece of malice, and descended the circular staircase, skipping like a bird.
A cross is the last thing I would wear as a trinket.
She took off the glove and raised the ring to her lips, though I doubt not it was the cheapest trinket.
She always had worn it since, but it had not been upon her body when he found her slain in her boudoir, so that now his quest for vengeance included also a quest for the stolen trinket.
This is like one of those Red-skin stories where the noble savages carry off a girl and the honest backwoodsman with his incomparable knowledge follows the track and reads the signs of her fate in a footprint here, a broken twig there, a trinket dropped by the way.
Of course, that's all taradiddle; he lies like a horse, for I know this Dushkin, he is a pawnbroker and a receiver of stolen goods, and he did not cheat Nikolay out of a thirty-rouble trinket in order to give it to the police.
Tarlatan and tulle were cheap at Nice, so she enveloped herself in them on such occasions, and following the sensible English fashion of simple dress for young girls, got up charming little toilettes with fresh flowers, a few trinkets, and all manner of dainty devices, which were both inexpensive and effective.
The Hankses, the Dobsons, the Pilligrews, the Ortons, the Grangers, the Hales, the Fullers, the Holcombs, in fact everybody that lives around about Patsy Cooper's had been robbed of little things like trinkets and teaspoons and suchlike small valuables that are easily carried off.