tripe


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tripe

 (trīp)
n.
1. The rubbery lining of the stomach of cattle or other ruminants, used as food.
2. Informal Something of no value; rubbish.

[Middle English, from Old French tripes, intestines, tripe.]

tripe

(traɪp)
n
1. (Cookery) the stomach lining of an ox, cow, or other ruminant, prepared for cooking
2. informal something silly; rubbish
3. (Anatomy) (plural) archaic informal intestines; belly
[C13: from Old French, of unknown origin]

tripe

(traɪp)

n.
1. the first and second divisions of the stomach of a ruminant, esp. oxen or sheep used as food.
2. Slang. something, esp. speech or writing, that is false or worthless.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Old French]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tripe - lining of the stomach of a ruminant (especially a bovine) used as food
organs, variety meat - edible viscera of a butchered animal
honeycomb tripe - lining of the reticulum (or second stomach) of a ruminant used as food
2.tripe - nonsensical talk or writing
drivel, garbage - a worthless message
jargon, lingo, patois, argot, vernacular, slang, cant - a characteristic language of a particular group (as among thieves); "they don't speak our lingo"

tripe

noun (Informal) nonsense, rot, trash, twaddle, balls (taboo slang), bull (slang), rubbish, shit (taboo slang), pants (slang), crap (slang), garbage (informal), bullshit (taboo slang), hot air (informal), tosh (slang, chiefly Brit.), bollocks (Brit. taboo slang), pap, cobblers (Brit. taboo slang), bilge (informal), drivel, guff (slang), moonshine, claptrap (informal), hogwash, hokum (slang, chiefly U.S. & Canad.), piffle (informal), poppycock (informal), inanity, balderdash, bosh (informal), eyewash (informal), trumpery, tommyrot, foolish talk, horsefeathers (U.S. slang), bunkum or buncombe (chiefly U.S.) I've never heard such a load of tripe in all my life.
Translations

tripe

[traɪp] N
1. (Culin) → callos mpl
2. (esp Brit) → tonterías fpl, babosadas fpl (LAm) , pendejadas fpl (LAm)
what utter tripe!¡tonterías!
he talks a lot of tripeno habla más que bobadas
3. tripes (= guts) → tripas fpl

tripe

[ˈtraɪp] n
(COOKERY)tripes fpl
(pejorative) (= rubbish) → idioties fpl

tripe

n
(Cook) → Kaldaunen pl, → Kutteln pl (S Ger, Aus, Sw)
(fig inf)Quatsch m, → Stuss m (inf)

tripe

[traɪp] n (Culin) → trippa (fam, pej) (rubbish) → sciocchezze fpl, fesserie fpl
References in classic literature ?
said Jurgis' friend; the things that went into the mixture were tripe, and the fat of pork, and beef suet, and hearts of beef, and finally the waste ends of veal, when they had any.
I don't believe he may even eat or drink what he likes best; a taste for tripe and onions on his part would provoke a remonstrance from the Privy Council.
She got up a lunch which comprised a leg of mutton, tripe, sausages, a chicken fricassee, sweet cider, a fruit tart and some preserved prunes; then to all this the good woman added polite remarks about Madame, who appeared to be in better health, Mademoiselle, who had grown to be "superb," and Paul, who had become singularly sturdy; she spoke also of their deceased grandparents, whom the Liebards had known, for they had been in the service of the family for several generations.
I put the crown in my drawer, and I say: 'This shall go to buy tripe at the slaughter-house of la Gloriette to-morrow.
So presently a savory stew of tripe and onions, with sweet little fat dumplings, was set before him, likewise a good stout pottle of Malmsey, and straightway the holy friar fell to with great courage and heartiness, so that in a short time nought was left but a little pool of gravy in the center of the platter, not large enow to keep the life in a starving mouse.
Tripe it was; and Meg, in high joy, protested he should say, in half a minute more, it was the best tripe ever stewed.
Eggs a la tripe, au gratin, a l'Aurore, a la Dauphine, a la Poulette, a la Tartare, a la Venitienne, a la Bordelaise
The poor Cat felt very weak, and he was able to eat only thirty-five mullets with tomato sauce and four portions of tripe with cheese.
You see, I got to thinking on the way here--what if you should say tripe, or onions, or something like that, that I didn't have
Presently the baronet plunged a fork into the saucepan on the fire, and withdrew from the pot a piece of tripe and an onion, which he divided into pretty equal portions, and of which he partook with Mrs.
In the course of five minutes after his arrival at that house of entertainment, he was enrolled among the gallant defenders of his native land; and within half an hour, was regaled with a steaming supper of boiled tripe and onions, prepared, as his friend assured him more than once, at the express command of his most Sacred Majesty the King.
It's a stew of tripe,' said the landlord smacking his lips, 'and cow-heel,' smacking them again, 'and bacon,' smacking them once more, 'and steak,' smacking them for the fourth time, 'and peas, cauliflowers, new potatoes, and sparrow-grass, all working up together in one delicious gravy.