trite


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trite

 (trīt)
adj. trit·er, trit·est
Not evoking interest because of overuse or repetition; hackneyed.

[Latin trītus, from past participle of terere, to wear out; see terə- in Indo-European roots.]

trite′ly adv.
trite′ness n.

trite

(traɪt)
adj
1. hackneyed; dull: a trite comment.
2. archaic frayed or worn out
[C16: from Latin trītus worn down, from terere to rub]
ˈtritely adv
ˈtriteness n

trite

(traɪt)

adj. trit•er, trit•est.
1. lacking in freshness or effectiveness because of constant use or excessive repetition; hackneyed.
2. characterized by hackneyed expressions, ideas, etc.
[1540–50; < Latin trītus worn, common, past participle of terere to rub, wear down]
trite′ly, adv.
trite′ness, n.
syn: See commonplace.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.trite - repeated too often; overfamiliar through overuse; "bromidic sermons"; "his remarks were trite and commonplace"; "hackneyed phrases"; "a stock answer"; "repeating threadbare jokes"; "parroting some timeworn axiom"; "the trite metaphor `hard as nails'"
unoriginal - not original; not being or productive of something fresh and unusual; "the manuscript contained unoriginal emendations"; "his life had been unoriginal, conforming completely to the given pattern"- Gwethalyn Graham

trite

trite

adjective
Translations
تافِه، مُبْتَذَل
otřelý
klichéagtig
banáliselcsépeltelkoptatott
útslitinn, margtugginn
banaliaibanalumas
banālsnodrāzts
banálny
basma kalıpbayat

trite

[traɪt] ADJtrillado, manido

trite

[ˈtraɪt] adjbanal(e)

trite

adj (+er) (= trivial, banal)banal, nichtssagend; (= hackneyed)abgedroschen; it would be trite to say that …es wäre banal zu sagen, dass …

trite

[traɪt] adj (remark) → banale; (story, idea) → trito/a e ritrito/a

trite

(trait) adjective
(of a remark, saying etc) already said in exactly the same way so often that it no longer has any worth, effectiveness etc. His poetry is full of trite descriptions of nature.
ˈtritely adverb
ˈtriteness noun
References in classic literature ?
If he struggles to take a different view of the same class of subjects, he speedily discovers that what is obvious, graceful, and natural, has been exhausted; and, in order to obtain the indispensable charm of novelty, he is forced upon caricature, and, to avoid being trite, must become extravagant.
For it is an observation, as true as it is trite, that there is nothing men differ so readily about as the payment of money.
And do not let any one impugn this statement with the trite proverb that "He who builds on the people, builds on the mud," for this is true when a private citizen makes a foundation there, and persuades himself that the people will free him when he is oppressed by his enemies or by the magistrates; wherein he would find himself very often deceived, as happened to the Gracchi in Rome and to Messer Giorgio Scali[+] in Florence.
Take your pens and commence writing," said I, in as dry and trite a voice as if I had been addressing only Jules Vanderkelkov and Co.
Also, if he thinks it incumbent upon him to be fanciful, original, and out of the way, his fancy always assumes a foolish, unnatural vein, for the reason that it is compounded of trite, hackneyed forms.
I found her more interesting than her little problem, which, by the way, is rather a trite one.
You open a book and try to read, but you find Shakespeare trite and commonplace, Dickens is dull and prosy, Thackeray a bore, and Carlyle too sentimental.
The rest took place with the trite rapidity of the equatorial latitudes.
Let us have a little algebra, instead of this trite rhetoric,--universal signs, instead of these village symbols,--and we shall both be gainers.
A trite platitude about his not caring to lose her was on his lips, but he refrained from uttering it.
To a people of this nature the Homeric epos would be inacceptable, and the post-Homeric epic, with its conventional atmosphere, its trite and hackneyed diction, and its insincere sentiment, would be anathema.
In the old trite saying that love is a projection of self--an egoisme a deux--lies a profound meaning known only to philosopher and poet; for it is ourself in truth that we love in that other.