trite

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trite

 (trīt)
adj. trit·er, trit·est
Not evoking interest because of overuse or repetition; hackneyed.

[Latin trītus, from past participle of terere, to wear out; see terə- in Indo-European roots.]

trite′ly adv.
trite′ness n.

trite

(traɪt)
adj
1. hackneyed; dull: a trite comment.
2. archaic frayed or worn out
[C16: from Latin trītus worn down, from terere to rub]
ˈtritely adv
ˈtriteness n

trite

(traɪt)

adj. trit•er, trit•est.
1. lacking in freshness or effectiveness because of constant use or excessive repetition; hackneyed.
2. characterized by hackneyed expressions, ideas, etc.
[1540–50; < Latin trītus worn, common, past participle of terere to rub, wear down]
trite′ly, adv.
trite′ness, n.
syn: See commonplace.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.trite - repeated too often; overfamiliar through overuse; "bromidic sermons"; "his remarks were trite and commonplace"; "hackneyed phrases"; "a stock answer"; "repeating threadbare jokes"; "parroting some timeworn axiom"; "the trite metaphor `hard as nails'"
unoriginal - not original; not being or productive of something fresh and unusual; "the manuscript contained unoriginal emendations"; "his life had been unoriginal, conforming completely to the given pattern"- Gwethalyn Graham

trite

trite

adjective
Translations
تافِه، مُبْتَذَل
otřelý
klichéagtig
banáliselcsépeltelkoptatott
útslitinn, margtugginn
banaliaibanalumas
banālsnodrāzts
banálny
basma kalıpbayat

trite

[traɪt] ADJtrillado, manido

trite

[ˈtraɪt] adjbanal(e)

trite

adj (+er) (= trivial, banal)banal, nichtssagend; (= hackneyed)abgedroschen; it would be trite to say that …es wäre banal zu sagen, dass …

trite

[traɪt] adj (remark) → banale; (story, idea) → trito/a e ritrito/a

trite

(trait) adjective
(of a remark, saying etc) already said in exactly the same way so often that it no longer has any worth, effectiveness etc. His poetry is full of trite descriptions of nature.
ˈtritely adverb
ˈtriteness noun
References in periodicals archive ?
Sy--a singer not unknown to opera-savvy Torontonians as a dual winner in the COC s 2014 Centre Stage Competition--gave his considerable best to one of teenage Mozart's most unwieldy inventions: an Act II recitativo accompagnato that's as good as anything in the score, leading into the tritest of arias.
Said further says that Naipaul is "in favor of the tritest, the cheapest and the easiest of colonial mythologies about wogs and darkies" (Said 37).
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The teacher, at Magnolia West High School in Texas, knows Reagan is a good kid and a diligent student, but how could he just accept the oldest, tritest excuse in the books?
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capable of reflecting only the tritest thought, the most obvious emotion.
It takes a great deal of ability, real knowledge and intellectual courage to write an informing, truth telling review of the tritest book, and the elaborate pointillisme implicit in an endless array of abstracted material is just as fate-giving to the mind as the same number of relatively commonplace themes exploited, each of them, on canvases of vast dimensions.
the novel, which at my maturity was the strongest and supplest medium for conveying thought and emotion from one human being to another, was becoming subordinated to a mechanical and communal art that, whether in the hands of Hollywood merchants or Russian idealists, was capable of reflecting only the tritest thought, the most obvious emotion.
Its the tritest of academic cliches of course: the professor/student affair.