trivial


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triv·i·al

 (trĭv′ē-əl)
adj.
1. Of little significance or value.
2. Concerned with or involving unimportant matters; superficial: a trivial colleague; a trivial remark.
3. Mathematics
a. Of, relating to, or being the solution of an equation in which every variable is equal to zero.
b. Of, relating to, or being the simplest possible case; self-evident.

[Middle English trivialle, of the trivium (from Medieval Latin triviālis, from trivium, trivium; see trivium) and Latin triviālis, ordinary (from trivium, crossroads).]

triv′i·al·ly adv.
Synonyms: trivial, trifling, paltry, petty, picayune
These adjectives all apply to what is unimportant and of little consequence. Trivial and trifling refer to what is so insignificant as to be utterly commonplace or unremarkable: "Both sides appreciated that behind this apparently trivial matter of naval salutes lay weighty issues of sovereignty at sea" (Simon Schama). "Now he was smitten with compunction, yet irritated that so trifling an omission should be stored up against him after nearly two years of marriage" (Edith Wharton).
Paltry describes what falls so far short of what is required or desired that it arouses contempt: "The mere fact of grave issues in life depending on such paltry things is monstrously ludicrous" (George Gissing).
Petty usually refers to what is of minor or lesser significance: "Religious slurs, temper tantrums, insults, coercion, debt: all petty things, really, irritants—too minor, it would seem, to move five reasonable people to murder" (Donna Tartt).
What is picayune is of negligible value or importance: "Everything was numbers-oriented—better to close out thirty-five picayune cases than go after two quality ones" (Selwyn Raab).
Word History: The word trivial entered Middle English with senses quite different from its most common contemporary ones. We find in a work from 1432-50 mention of the "arte trivialle," an allusion to the three liberal arts that made up the trivium, the lower division of the seven liberal arts taught in medieval universities—grammar, rhetoric, and logic. The history of trivial goes back to the Latin word trivium, formed from the prefix tri-, "three," and via, "road." Trivium thus meant "the meeting place of three roads, especially as a place of public resort." The publicness of such a place also gave the word a pejorative sense that we express in the phrase the gutter, as in "His manners were formed in the gutter." The Latin adjective triviālis, derived from trivium, thus meant "appropriate to the street corner, commonplace, vulgar." Trivial is first recorded in English with a sense identical to that of triviālis in 1589. Shortly after that trivial is recorded in the sense most familiar to us, "of little importance or significance," making it a word now used of things less weighty than grammar, rhetoric, and logic.

trivial

(ˈtrɪvɪəl)
adj
1. of little importance; petty or frivolous: trivial complaints.
2. ordinary or commonplace; trite: trivial conversation.
3. (Mathematics) maths (of the solutions of a set of homogeneous equations) having zero values for all the variables
4. (Biology) biology denoting the specific name of an organism in binomial nomenclature
5. (Biology) biology chem denoting the popular name of an organism or substance, as opposed to the scientific one
6. (Historical Terms) of or relating to the trivium
[C15: from Latin triviālis belonging to the public streets, common, from trivium crossroads, junction of three roads, from tri- + via road]
ˈtrivially adv
ˈtrivialness n

triv•i•al

(ˈtrɪv i əl)

adj.
1. of very little importance or value; insignificant.
2. commonplace; ordinary.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin triviālis commonplace =trivi(um) place where three roads meet, public place (tri- tri- + -vium, derivative of via road) + -ālis -al1]
triv′i•al•ism, n.
triv′i•al•ist, n.
triv′i•al•ly, adv.
syn: See petty.

trivial

  • folderol - Trivial or nonsensical fuss, nonsense, or a useless trifle.
  • nugacious, nugatory - Nugacious and nugatory are synonyms for trivial.
  • pelsy - Means "trivial, trashy, of little value."
  • psilology - A love of trivial or vacuous talk.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.trivial - (informal) small and of little importance; "a fiddling sum of money"; "a footling gesture"; "our worries are lilliputian compared with those of countries that are at war"; "a little (or small) matter"; "a dispute over niggling details"; "limited to petty enterprises"; "piffling efforts"; "giving a police officer a free meal may be against the law, but it seems to be a picayune infraction"
colloquialism - a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech
unimportant - not important; "a relatively unimportant feature of the system"; "the question seems unimportant"
2.trivial - of little substance or significancetrivial - of little substance or significance; "a few superficial editorial changes"; "only trivial objections"
unimportant, insignificant - devoid of importance, meaning, or force
3.trivial - concerned with trivialitiestrivial - concerned with trivialities; "a trivial young woman"; "a trivial mind"
frivolous - not serious in content or attitude or behavior; "a frivolous novel"; "a frivolous remark"; "a frivolous young woman"

trivial

adjective unimportant, little, small, minor, slight, everyday, petty, meaningless, commonplace, worthless, trifling, insignificant, negligible, frivolous, paltry, incidental, puny, inconsequential, trite, inconsiderable, valueless, nickel-and-dime (U.S. slang), wanky (taboo slang), chickenshit (U.S. slang) I don't like to visit the doctor just for something trivial.
important, serious, significant, essential, vital, crucial, unusual, considerable, profound, worthwhile, uncommon, weighty
Quotations
"What mighty contests rise from trivial things" [Alexander Pope The Rape of the Lock]

trivial

adjective
Translations
bezvýznamnýtriviálnídruhovýpovrchní
triviel
arginetavalinetühine
mitätöntavallinentriviaalivähäpätöinenyksinkertainen
trivijalan
igénytelen
smávægileguryfirborîslegur, léttúîugur
些細な自明な蛇足の通称ありふれた
사소한
nepomemben
trivial
ไม่สำคัญ
önemsizönemsiz ayrıntılarla ilgilenendeğersiz
ít quan trọng

trivial

[ˈtrɪvɪəl] ADJ [details, matter] → trivial, banal; [person] → frívolo; [sum] → insignificante, nimio
I found it all rather trivialme parecía todo muy trivial

trivial

[ˈtrɪviəl] adj [details, matter, problem, offence, film, conversation] → insignifiant(e)

trivial

adj
trivial; objection, loss, details, mattersgeringfügig, belanglos, trivial; mistakebelanglos; look, your health is not something trivialhör mal, mit der Gesundheit ist nicht zu spaßen!; the trivial rounddas triviale Einerlei
personoberflächlich

trivial

[ˈtrɪvɪəl] adj (matter) → futile; (excuse, comment) → banale; (amount) → irrisorio/a; (mistake) → di poco conto

trivia

(ˈtriviə) noun plural
unimportant matters or details. I haven't time to worry about such trivia.
ˈtrivial adjective
1. of very little importance. trivial details.
2. (especially of people) only interested in unimportant things; not at all serious. She's a very trivial person.
ˈtrivially adverb
ˌtriviˈality (-ˈa-) noun
1. the state of being trivial.
2. (plural triviˈalities) something which is trivial. He is always worrying about some triviality or other.

trivial

تَافِه triviální triviel trivial τετριμμένος trivial vähäpätöinen trivial trivijalan insignificante 些細な 사소한 triviaal triviell błahy trivial тривиальный trivial ไม่สำคัญ önemsiz ít quan trọng 微不足道的
References in classic literature ?
To others it might seem a ludicrous or trivial affair, but to her it was a hard experience, for during the twelve years of her life she had been governed by love alone, and a blow of that sort had never touched her before.
If she ignored his note it would give undue importance to a trivial affair.
Nevertheless, if we look through all the heroic fortunes of mankind, we shall find this same entanglement of something mean and trivial with whatever is noblest in joy or sorrow.
Besides, it was the stronger men in the Town-Ho that had been divided into gangs, taking turns at the pumps; and being the most athletic seaman of them all, Steelkilt had been regularly assigned captain of one of the gangs; consequently he should have been freed from any trivial business not connected with truly nautical duties, such being the case with his comrades.
It is the body of which roads are the arms and legs--a trivial or quadrivial place, the thoroughfare and ordinary of travelers.
Martyrdom made a saint of the trivial and foolish Marie Antoinette, and her biographers still keep her fragrant with the odor of sanctity to this day, while unconsciously proving upon almost every page they write that the only calamitous instinct which her husband lacked, she supplied--the instinct to root out and get rid of an honest, able, and loyal official, wherever she found him.
Music, in common with all other accomplishments, was viewed by Miss Miranda as a trivial, useless, and foolish amusement, but she allowed Rebecca an hour a day for practice on the old piano, and a little extra time for lessons, if Jane could secure them without payment of actual cash.
Woodhouse, full of trivial communications and harmless gossip.
Marianne was silent; it was impossible for her to say what she did not feel, however trivial the occasion; and upon Elinor therefore the whole task of telling lies when politeness required it, always fell.
My help had been needed and claimed; I had given it: I was pleased to have done something; trivial, transitory though the deed was, it was yet an active thing, and I was weary of an existence all passive.
Vanstone's return -- an event which presented, on the surface of it, no interest of greater importance than the trivial social ceremony of a morning call.
All these trivial incidents belonged to the routine of life, and the return of morning.