troops


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troop

 (tro͞op)
n.
1.
a. A group of soldiers.
b. troops Military units; soldiers.
c. A unit of cavalry, armored vehicles, or artillery in a European army, corresponding to a platoon in the US Army.
2. A unit of at least five Boy Scouts or Girl Scouts under the guidance of an adult leader.
3. A group or company of people, animals, or things.
intr.v. trooped, troop·ing, troops
To move or go as a group or in large numbers: The students trooped into the auditorium.

[French troupe, from Old French trope, probably from Vulgar Latin *troppu-.]

troops

  • squadron - Borrowed from Italian squadrone, from Latin quadrare, "square"; the sense of "military group" comes from an earlier "square formation of troops."
  • campaign - First meant an open tract of land, from Latin campus, "level ground," and the change to a military meaning came from troops "taking the field"—moving from fortress or town to open country—from which the political sense evolved, referring to the organized efforts of office-seekers to sway public opinion or influence their vote at an upcoming election.
  • echelon - Comes from French echelle, "ladder," from Latin scala, and first meant a formation of troops.
  • corporal - Its military meaning came from "the head of a body of troops," from French caporale.

troops

A collective term for uniformed military personnel (usually not applicable to naval personnel afloat). See also airborne troops; combat service support elements; combat support troops; service troops; tactical troops.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.troops - soldiers collectivelytroops - soldiers collectively    
army unit - a military unit that is part of an army
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
personnel, force - group of people willing to obey orders; "a public force is necessary to give security to the rights of citizens"
friendly - troops belonging to or allied with your own military forces; "friendlies came to their rescue"
hostile - troops belonging to the enemy's military forces; "the platoon ran into a pack of hostiles"
cavalry, horse cavalry, horse - troops trained to fight on horseback; "500 horse led the attack"
garrison - the troops who maintain and guard a fortified place
Translations
جُنُودقُوّات
vojácivojsko
soldatertropper
sotajoukot
trupe
katonaság
herliî
軍隊
군대
vojaci
čete
trupper
กองทหาร
askerlerbirlikler
lính

troop

(truːp) noun
1. a group of ordinary soldiers.
2. a crowd or collection (of people or animals). A troop of visitors arrived.
verb
to go in a group. They all trooped into his office.
ˈtrooper noun
an ordinary soldier.
troops noun plural
soldiers.

troops

جُنُود vojsko soldater Truppen στρατεύματα tropas sotajoukot troupes trupe truppe 軍隊 군대 troepen tropper wojsko tropa войска trupper กองทหาร birlikler lính 部队
References in classic literature ?
All serene on the Rappahannock, troops in fine condition, commisary department well conducted, the Home Guard under Colonel Teddy always on duty, Commander in Chief General Laurence reviews the army daily, Quartermaster Mullet keeps order in camp, and Major Lion does picket duty at night.
The rude path, which originally formed their line of communication, had been widened for the passage of wagons; so that the distance which had been traveled by the son of the forest in two hours, might easily be effected by a detachment of troops, with their necessary baggage, between the rising and setting of a summer sun.
Sleek unwieldy porkers were grunting in the repose and abundance of their pens, from whence sallied forth, now and then, troops of sucking pigs, as if to snuff the air.
At last he paused before it; and as in an already over-clouded sky fresh troops of clouds will sometimes sail across, so over the old man's face there now stole some such added gloom as this.
Yet ten years before, when there were no unions in Packingtown, there was a strike, and national troops had to be called, and there were pitched battles fought at night, by the light of blazing freight trains.
In the town were some substantial windowless houses of stone scattered among a wilderness of thatched cabins; the streets were mere crooked alleys, and un- paved; troops of dogs and nude children played in the sun and made life and noise; hogs roamed and rooted contentedly about, and one of them lay in a reeking wallow in the middle of the main thoroughfare and suckled her family.
There had been distractions in the carriage-road-- school-children, peasants, wagons, troops of pedestrianizing students from all over Germany-- but we had the old road to ourselves.
That, the proof would go back five years, and would show the prisoner already engaged in these pernicious missions, within a few weeks before the date of the very first action fought between the British troops and the Americans.
Very stiff and sore of foot I was in the morning, and quite dazed by the beating of drums and marching of troops, which seemed to hem me in on every side when I went down towards the long narrow street.
So, we had our slices served out, as if we were two thousand troops on a forced march instead of a man and boy at home; and we took gulps of milk and water, with apologetic countenances, from a jug on the dresser.
The rest of Prince John's retinue consisted of the favourite leaders of his mercenary troops, some marauding barons and profligate attendants upon the court, with several Knights Templars and Knights of St John.
It was likewise ordered, that three hundred tailors should make me a suit of clothes, after the fashion of the country; that six of his majesty's greatest scholars should be employed to instruct me in their language; and lastly, that the emperor's horses, and those of the nobility and troops of guards, should be frequently exercised in my sight, to accustom themselves to me.