trophic


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troph·ic

 (trŏf′ĭk, trō′fĭk)
adj.
1. Of or relating to nutrition.
2. Ecology Of or involving the feeding habits or relationships of different organisms in a food chain or food web.

trophic

(ˈtrɒfɪk)
adj
(Environmental Science) of or relating to nutrition: the trophic levels of a food chain.
[C19: from Greek trophikos, from trophē food, from trephein to feed]
ˈtrophically adv

troph•ic

(ˈtrɒf ɪk, ˈtroʊ fɪk)

adj.
of or pertaining to nutrition; involving nutritive processes: a trophic disease.
[1870–75; < Greek trophikós pertaining to food. See tropho-, -ic]
troph′i•cal•ly, adv.

-trophic

a combining form with the meanings “deriving nourishment” from the source or in the manner specified (autotrophic; eutrophic), “affecting the activity of, maintaining” that specified (thyrotrophic) (in this sense often interchangeable with -tropic); also forming adjectives corresponding to nouns ending in -troph or -trophy (hypertrophic).
[see trophic]

troph·ic

(trŏf′ĭk)
Relating to the feeding habits of different organisms in a food chain or web: the trophic interactions between insects and mammals. ♦ A group of organisms occupying the same position in a food chain is called a trophic level.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.trophic - of or relating to nutritiontrophic - of or relating to nutrition; "a trophic level on the food chain"
Translations

troph·ic

a. trófico-a, rel. a la nutrición.
References in periodicals archive ?
Such as environmental variability, bycatch and incidental catch levels of the fishery, trophic interactions.
The risk of hyper trophic cardiomyopathy being passed on to a child 50%
This comprehensive approach will allow (1) to characterize the distribution of AFAs in aquatic systems between sediment, surface water and biota; (2) to identify bioTPs (and biotransformation pathways) of AFAs at different trophic levels but also TPs from other relevant processes (e.
The various forms of Se are known to be transferred between trophic levels from plants to insect herbivores and on to insect predators, although the bioavailability of each form at each trophic level is not fully understood.
In the present work, we studied the composition of soil in 10 nematofauna wine stations to determine the end of generic and trophic diversity of terrestrial pests and explain the influence of some physicochemical soil factors on these nematode fluctuations.
Elton (1927) argued that the general constraint on food chain length may be largely related to the loss of energy in successive trophic levels due to low conversion efficiency in consumer species.
Garvey working on the organism level and Whiles on the ecosystem level, found that trophic ecology was the key concept that let them work together.
GDNF is a trophic factor known to protect motor neurons.
In addition, from the knowledge of fish diet, the species can be grouped into trophic groups, which indicate fish function in the ecosystem (Matthews, 1998).
Trophic cascades are changes in food availability that occur when an increase or decrease of a population impacts other species in the food chain.
Understanding trophic relationships among Caribbean sea urchins
Nitrogen isotope ratios become enriched at successive trophic levels, thereby allowing estimates of the consumer's trophic position.