troublesome


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trou·ble·some

 (trŭb′əl-səm)
adj.
Characterized by or causing trouble or anxiety.

trou′ble·some·ly adv.
trou′ble·some·ness n.

troublesome

(ˈtrʌbəlsəm)
adj
1. causing a great deal of trouble; worrying, upsetting, or annoying
2. characterized by violence; turbulent
ˈtroublesomely adv
ˈtroublesomeness n

trou•ble•some

(ˈtrʌb əl səm)

adj.
causing trouble or difficulty.
[1540–50]
trou′ble•some•ly, adv.
trou′ble•some•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.troublesome - difficult to deal withtroublesome - difficult to deal with; "a troublesome infection"; "a troublesome situation"
difficult, hard - not easy; requiring great physical or mental effort to accomplish or comprehend or endure; "a difficult task"; "nesting places on the cliffs are difficult of access"; "difficult times"; "why is it so hard for you to keep a secret?"

troublesome

adjective
2. disorderly, violent, turbulent, rebellious, unruly, rowdy, recalcitrant, undisciplined, uncooperative, refractory, insubordinate Parents may find that a troublesome teenager becomes unmanageable.
disorderly disciplined, obedient, well-behaved, eager-to-please

troublesome

adjective
1. Causing difficulty, trouble, or discomfort:
3. Troubling the nerves or peace of mind, as by repeated vexations:
4. Hard to treat, manage, or cope with:
Informal: pesky.
Slang: mean.
Translations
مُزْعِج، مُقْلِق
obtížný
besværlig
òungbær, erfiîur
baş belâsımusibet

troublesome

[ˈtrʌblsəm] ADJ [person] → fastidioso, molesto, latoso; [headache, toothache etc] → molesto; [dispute, problem] → difícil, penoso
now don't be troublesomeno seas difícil

troublesome

[ˈtrʌbəlsəm] adj [child, teenager] → difficile; [cough, stammer, injury] → gênant(e), pénible; [problem, issue] → ennuyeux/eusetrouble spot npoint m chaud

troublesome

[ˈtrʌblsəm] adj (person) → molesto/a, importuno/a; (headache) → fastidioso/a; (dispute, problem) → difficile, seccante

trouble

(ˈtrabl) noun
1. (something which causes) worry, difficulty, work, anxiety etc. He never talks about his troubles; We've had a lot of trouble with our children; I had a lot of trouble finding the book you wanted.
2. disturbances; rebellion, fighting etc. It occurred during the time of the troubles in Cyprus.
3. illness or weakness (in a particular part of the body). He has heart trouble.
verb
1. to cause worry, anger or sadness to. She was troubled by the news of her sister's illness.
2. used as part of a very polite and formal request. May I trouble you to close the window?
3. to make any effort. He didn't even trouble to tell me what had happened.
ˈtroubled adjective
(negative untroubled).
1. worried or anxious. He is obviously a troubled man.
2. disturbed and not peaceful. troubled sleep.
ˈtroublesome adjective
causing worry or difficulty. troublesome children/tasks.
ˈtroublemaker noun
a person who continually (and usually deliberately) causes worry, difficulty or disturbance to other people. Beware of her – she is a real troublemaker.
References in classic literature ?
A TROUBLESOME CROW seated herself on the back of a Sheep.
The fact is, that there was considerable difficulty in inducing Oliver to take upon himself the office of respiration,--a troublesome practice, but one which custom has rendered necessary to our easy existence; and for some time he lay gasping on a little flock mattress, rather unequally poised between this world and the next: the balance being decidedly in favour of the latter.
That man so troublesome to your majesty was one General Monk, I believe; did I not hear his name correctly, sire?
I like him on the whole very well; he is clever and has a good deal to say, but he is sometimes impertinent and troublesome.
But sometimes it is seen, that the moderator is more troublesome, than the actor.
Then the many are of another mind; they think that justice is to be reckoned in the troublesome class, among goods which are to be pursued for the sake of rewards and of reputation, but in themselves are disagreeable and rather to be avoided.
Giving birth is troublesome,"--say others--"why still give birth?
If the young fellow dies, the man who struck him will have most reason to be sorry for it: for the regiment will get rid of a very troublesome fellow, who is a scandal to the army; and if he escapes from the hands of justice, blame me, madam, that's all.
I confess, however, that I do not think of him as a patriot and a socialist when I read him; he is then purely a poet, whose gift holds me rapt above the world where I have left my troublesome and wearisome self for the time.
There was no denying that Dorothea was as virtuous and lovely a young lady as he could have obtained for a wife; but a young lady turned out to be something more troublesome than he had conceived.
Poverty and labour bore hard upon him, especially as county officers were getting troublesome, and in a weak moment he did the wicked act; but he has listened to my words, and his mind has got round again into its honest corner.
Perhaps there never was a man, in this troublesome world, so troublesome for the imagination to picture as a boy.