trousers


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trou·ser

 (trou′zər)
n. often trousers
A pair of pants, especially when extending from waist to ankles.

[Back-formation from trousers, alteration of obsolete trouse, from Scottish Gaelic triubhas.]

trou′sered (-zərd) adj.

trousers

(ˈtraʊzəz)
pl n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) a garment shaped to cover the body from the waist to the ankles or knees with separate tube-shaped sections for both legs
2. wear the trousers informal Brit to have control, esp in a marriage. US equivalent: wear the pants
[C17: from earlier trouse, a variant of trews, influenced by drawers]
ˈtrousered adj
ˈtrouserless adj

trou•sers

(ˈtraʊ zərz)

n. (used with a pl. v.)
Sometimes, trouser. a usu. loose-fitting outer garment for the lower part of the body, having individual leg portions, usu. of full length.Also called pants. Compare slacks.
[1585–95; trouse (< Irish triubhas; see trews) + (draw) ers]

trousers

  • fob - A small pocket close to the waistband of trousers.
  • galluses - Another name for suspenders for trousers.
  • plus fours - Got their name (c. 1920) from the fact that such trousers were made four inches longer than standard knickerbockers or shorts, which came to just above the knee.
  • trousers, trouse - The singular of trousers is trouse.

trousers

Trousers are a piece of clothing that covers your body from the waist downwards, and covers each leg separately. Trousers is a plural noun. You use a plural form of a verb with it.

His trousers were covered in mud.

Don't talk about 'a trousers'. You say some trousers or a pair of trousers.

It's time I bought myself some new trousers.
Umar was dressed in a pair of black trousers.

You usually use a singular form of a verb with a pair of trousers.

There was a pair of trousers in his carrier-bag.

The form trouser is often used in front of another noun.

The waiter took a handkerchief from his trouser pocket.
Hamo was rolling up his trouser leg.

In American English, more common words for this item of clothing are pants or slacks.

trousers

pants
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

trousers

plural noun slacks, pants (U.S.), strides (chiefly Austral. informal), kecks (Brit. informal) He was smartly dressed in a shirt, dark trousers and boots.

Trousers and shorts

bell-bottoms, Bermuda shorts, bloomers, breeches, britches, or (Scot.) breeks, buckskins, Capri pants or Capris, cargo pants, chinos, churidars, combats, cords or corduroys, culottes, cycling shorts, denims, drainpipes, dungarees, flannels, flares, galligaskins or gallygaskins, hipsters or (U.S.) hip-huggers, hot pants, jeans, jodhpurs, Kachera, knickerbockers or (U.S.) knickers, lederhosen, leggings, Levis (trademark), loon pants or loons, overalls, Oxford bags, palazzo pants, pantaloons, pedal pushers, plus fours, pyjamas, riding breeches, salopettes, shalwar, ski pants, slacks, slops, smallclothes, spatterdashes, stovepipes, sweat-suit trousers, tracksuit trousers, jogging trousers, or joggers, toreador pants, trews, trouse (Brit.), trunk hose
Translations
بَنْطَلونبَنْطَلُون
pantalópantalons
kalhoty
bukser
püksid
housut
hlače
nadrág
celana
buxur
ズボン
바지
kelnių
bikses
pantaloni
nohavice
hlače
byxor
กางเกง
quần

trousers

[ˈtraʊzərz] npl (mainly British)pantalon m
a pair of trousers → un pantalon
short trousers → culottes fpl courtestrouser suit [ˈtraʊzərsuːt] n (mainly British)tailleur-pantalon m

trousers

pl (esp Brit) (also pair of trousers)Hose f; she was wearing trouserssie hatte Hosen or eine Hose an; to wear the trousers (fig inf)die Hosen anhaben (inf); to be caught with one’s trousers down (inf, lit: sexually) → in flagranti erwischt werden (inf); (fig)überrumpelt werden; (= unprepared)sich kalt erwischen lassen (inf)

trousers

[ˈtraʊzəz] npl (Brit) → pantaloni mpl, calzoni mpl
short trousers → calzoncini mpl
she wears the trousers (fig) → è lei che porta i calzoni

trousers

(ˈtrauzəz) noun plural
an outer garment for the lower part of the body, covering each leg separately. He wore (a pair of) black trousers; She was dressed in trousers and a sweater.
trouser-
of trousers. a trouser-button; That dog has torn my trouser-leg.

trousers

بَنْطَلُون kalhoty bukser Hose παντελόνι pantalón housut pantalon hlače pantaloni ズボン 바지 broek bukser spodnie calças брюки byxor กางเกง pantolon quần 裤子

trousers

n., pl. pantalones.
References in classic literature ?
We worked like tigers, especially as summer came on and the academy boys took to the wearing of duck trousers.
His teeth came together in the slack of the white duck trousers.
Here he held Martin off at arm's length and ran his beaming eyes over Martin's second-best suit, which was also his worst suit, and which was ragged and past repair, though the trousers showed the careful crease he had put in with Maria's flat-irons.
On the miserable bed lay a gray-headed old man of gigantic stature, with nothing on him but a ragged shirt and a pair of patched, filthy trousers.
Thick-set and of middle height, with nimble movements, with his brown hat, olive-green coat and narrow trousers--though wide trousers had been a long while in fashion,--most of all, with the ordinariness of his broad face, and the combined expression of timidity and anxiety to keep up his dignity, Mihailov made an unpleasant impression.
Their yearly clothing consisted of two coarse linen shirts, one pair of linen trousers, like the shirts, one jacket, one pair of trousers for winter, made of coarse negro cloth, one pair of stockings, and one pair of shoes; the whole of which could not have cost more than seven dollars.
But let us put our hands in our trousers pockets, and let there be some small change in the right-hand one and a bunch of keys in the left, and we will face a female post-office clerk.
He was roused by Mr Fledgeby's appearing erect at the foot of the bed, in Turkish slippers, rose-coloured Turkish trousers (got cheap from somebody who had cheated some other somebody out of them), and a gown and cap to correspond.
You'd make a healthy-lookin' figger in a group," responded Kearney, critically regarding an enormous patch in Mattingly's trousers.
When they had finished their song the girl in white went up to the prompter's box and a man with tight silk trousers over his stout legs, and holding a plume and a dagger, went up to her and began singing, waving his arms about.
Genevieve slipped on a pair of Joe's shoes, light-soled and dapper, and laughed with Lottie, who stooped to turn up the trousers for her.
Here follows the portrait of Monsieur Dutocq, order-clerk in the Rabourdin bureau: Thirty-eight years old, oblong face and bilious skin, grizzled hair always cut close, low forehead, heavy eyebrows meeting together, a crooked nose and pinched lips; tall, the right shoulder slightly higher than the left; brown coat, black waistcoat, silk cravat, yellowish trousers, black woollen stockings, and shoes with flapping bows; thus you behold him.