troy


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Related to troy: Helen of Troy, Achilles, Trojan Horse, Trojan War

Troy

 (troi)
1. also Il·i·on (ĭl′ē-ən, -ŏn′) or Il·i·um (-ē-əm) An ancient city of northwest Asia Minor near the Dardanelles. Originally a Phrygian city dating from the Bronze Age, it is the legendary site of the Trojan War and was captured and destroyed by Greek forces c. 1200 bc. The ruins of Troy were discovered by Heinrich Schliemann in 1871.
2. A city of eastern New York on the Hudson River northeast of Albany. Settled in the 1780s, it is the seat of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (founded 1824).

troy

 (troi)
adj. Abbr. t.
Of or expressed in troy weight.

[Middle English troye, after Troyes.]

Troy

(trɔɪ)
n
(Placename) any of nine ancient cities in NW Asia Minor, each of which was built on the ruins of its predecessor. The seventh was the site of the Trojan War (mid-13th century bc). Also called: Ilion or Ilium

troy

(trɔɪ)

adj.
expressed or computed in troy weight.
[1350–1400; Middle English troye, after Troyes, France, where it was standard]

Troy

(trɔɪ)

n.
1. Latin, Ilium. Greek, Ilion. an ancient ruined city in NW Asia Minor: the seventh of nine settlements on the site is commonly identified as the Troy of the Iliad.
2. a city in SE Michigan, near Detroit. 68,700.
3. a city in E New York, on the Hudson River. 52,150.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.troy - a system of weights used for precious metals and gemstones; based on a 12-ounce pound and an ounce of 480 grains
system of weights, weight - a system of units used to express the weight of something
troy unit - any of the unit of the troy system of weights
2.troy - an ancient city in Asia Minor that was the site of the Trojan WarTroy - an ancient city in Asia Minor that was the site of the Trojan War
Anatolia, Asia Minor - a peninsula in southwestern Asia that forms the Asian part of Turkey
Dardan, Dardanian, Trojan - a native of ancient Troy
Translations
TroiaTroja

Troy

[trɔɪ] NTroya f

troy

[ˈtrɔɪ] N (also troy weight) → peso m troy

Troy

n (Hist) → Troja nt ? Helen

troy

n (also troy weight)Troygewicht nt

Troy

[trɔɪ] nTroia
References in classic literature ?
That drop was falling when the Pyramids were new; when Troy fell; when the foundations of Rome were laid when Christ was crucified; when the Conqueror created the British empire; when Columbus sailed; when the massacre at Lexington was "news.
No Gothic scourge of God, no Vandal pest of nations, no fabled fugitive from the flames of Troy, no bastard Norman tyrant, appears among the list of worthies who first landed on the rock, which your veneration has preserved as a lasting monument of their achievement.
Sancho fell upon his knees devoutly appealing to heaven to deliver him from such imminent peril; which it did by the activity and quickness of the millers, who, pushing against the boat with their poles, stopped it, not, however, without upsetting and throwing Don Quixote and Sancho into the water; and lucky it was for Don Quixote that he could swim like a goose, though the weight of his armour carried him twice to the bottom; and had it not been for the millers, who plunged in and hoisted them both out, it would have been Troy town with the pair of them.
The proof is that the poets who have dramatised the whole story of the Fall of Troy, instead of selecting portions, like Euripides; or who have taken the whole tale of Niobe, and not a part of her story, like Aeschylus, either fail utterly or meet with poor success on the stage.
Tell me, O Muse, of that ingenious hero who travelled far and wide after he had sacked the famous town of Troy.
You, sir, take no heed of this, and yet when Ulysses was before Troy did he not propitiate you with many a burnt sacrifice?
Tell him to get the Achaeans instantly under arms, for he shall take Troy.
He bids you get the Achaeans instantly under arms, for you shall take Troy.
Troy was not only a man of learning and experience in his profession-- he was also a man who had seen something of society at home and abroad.
Troy listened with an expression of satirical approval.
From Troy the Ashmores moved in 1871 or 1872 to Richmond, Indiana, and a year or two later to the vicinity of Quincy, Illinois, where Mr.
This is how he tells of the way in which Aeneas saved his old father by carrying him on his shoulders out of the burning town of Troy when "The crackling flame was heard throughout the walls, and more and more the burning heat drew near.