truce


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truce

 (tro͞os)
n.
1. A temporary cessation or suspension of hostilities by agreement of the opposing sides; an armistice.
2. A respite from a disagreeable state of affairs.
tr. & intr.v. truced, truc·ing, truc·es
To end or be ended with a truce.

[Middle English trewes, pl. of trewe, treaty, pledge, from Old English trēow; see deru- in Indo-European roots.]

truce

(truːs)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) an agreement to stop fighting, esp temporarily
2. temporary cessation of something unpleasant
[C13: from the plural of Old English treow trow; see true, trust]

truce

(trus)

n.
1. a suspension of hostilities for a specified period of time by mutual agreement of the warring parties; cease-fire; armistice.
2. an agreement or treaty establishing this.
3. a temporary respite, as from trouble or pain.
[1175–1225; Middle English trewes, pl. of trewe, Old English trēow belief, pledge, treaty. See trow]
truce′less, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.truce - a state of peace agreed to between opponents so they can discuss peace termstruce - a state of peace agreed to between opponents so they can discuss peace terms
peace - the state prevailing during the absence of war

truce

noun ceasefire, break, stay, rest, peace, treaty, interval, moratorium, respite, lull, cessation, let-up (informal), armistice, intermission, cessation of hostilities The fighting has given way to an uneasy truce.

truce

noun
A temporary cessation of hostilities by mutual consent of the contending parties:
Translations
هُدْنَةهُدْنَه
příměří
våbenhvile
aselepo
primirje
fegyverszünet
vopnahlé
休戦
휴전
pamierspārtraukums
premirje
vapenvila
การสงบศึกชั่วคราว
ateşkesmütareke
thỏa ước ngừng bắn

truce

[truːs] N (Mil) → tregua f
to call a truce (Mil) (fig) → acordar una tregua

truce

[ˈtruːs] ntrêve f
to call a truce (in war)faire cesser les hostilités; (in argument, feud)faire la paix
Let's call a truce → Faisons la paix.

truce

n (Mil, fig) → Waffenstillstand m; (Mil, interrupting fighting) → Waffenruhe f; truce!Friede!

truce

[truːs] ntregua
to call a truce → dichiarare una tregua

truce

(truːs) noun
a (usually temporary) rest from fighting, agreed to by both sides.

truce

هُدْنَة příměří våbenhvile Waffenstillstand εκεχειρία tregua aselepo trêve primirje tregua 休戦 휴전 wapenstilstand våpenhvile rozejm trégua перемирие vapenvila การสงบศึกชั่วคราว ateşkes thỏa ước ngừng bắn 停战
References in classic literature ?
We could see the man who carried the flag of truce attempting to hold Silver back.
And with a dreadful oath he stumbled off, ploughed down the sand, was helped across the stockade, after four or five failures, by the man with the flag of truce, and disappeared in an instant afterwards among the trees.
And the heat went on and on, and sucked up all the moisture, till at last the main channel of the Waingunga was the only stream that carried a trickle of water between its dead banks; and when Hathi, the wild elephant, who lives for a hundred years and more, saw a long, lean blue ridge of rock show dry in the very centre of the stream, he knew that he was looking at the Peace Rock, and then and there he lifted up his trunk and proclaimed the Water Truce, as his father before him had proclaimed it fifty years ago.
As we had traded freely with them, and had been kindly used, we thought ourselves in no danger; but when we saw the people, we cut three boughs out of a tree, and stuck them up at a distance from us; which, it seems, is a mark in that country not only of a truce and friendship, but when it is accepted the other side set up three poles or boughs, which is a signal that they accept the truce too; but then this is a known condition of the truce, that you are not to pass beyond their three poles towards them, nor they to come past your three poles or boughs towards you; so that you are perfectly secure within the three poles, and all the space between your poles and theirs is allowed like a market for free converse, traffic, and commerce.
I have little of importance to say, lady,'' answered Sir Brian de Bois-Guilbert, ``excepting the confirmed tidings of a truce with Saladin.
There was no truce for him now, influenced as he was by jealousy and mad passion.
But a truce to these painful digressions: let me return to our houses.
When envoys are sent with compliments in their mouths, it is a sign that the enemy wishes for a truce.
I am speaking ze truce," replied the hussar with a smile.
Your majesty is well aware that there is a truce between us and the English army.
There was a corporeal humility in looking up at him; and a white man standing before him seemed a white flag come to beg truce of a fortress.
A truce to thy proverbs, Sancho," exclaimed Don Quixote; "any one of those thou hast uttered would suffice to explain thy meaning; many a time have I recommended thee not to be so lavish with proverbs and to exercise some moderation in delivering them; but it seems to me it is only 'preaching in the desert;' 'my mother beats me and I go on with my tricks.