true-crime

true-crime

(tro͞o′krīm′)
adj.
Based on or recounting an actual crime: a true-crime novel.
References in periodicals archive ?
The King assassination offers the author a chance to explore one of the most shocking events of the twentieth century alongside his own career, combining a true-crime tale with a literary memoir that attempts to explain his obsession with this murder, and with Ray himself.
8220;Kevin and Rebecca have once again crafted a true-crime classic,” said The Girl in the Leaves author Robert Scott.
But Mainstream founders Bill Campbell and Peter MacKenzie insisted they were going out on a high with a final true-crime title by Carol Ann Lee.
Aphrodite uses her unconventional and unique instincts to expose hard truths about cases that true-crime fans may have been too quick to judge during the media firestorm.
Barri Flowers and provides, under one cover, some of the best true-crime writers in the world.
Mr Thompson, a former crime correspondent of the Observer, is the author of Gangland Britain and Gangs, and is widelyregarded as one of Britain's top true-crime writers.
Murder Behind the Badge: True Stories of Cops Who Kill offers a true-crime narrative that reads like a thriller and comes from a former police officer and detective who tells eighteen stories about cops who kill.
Written in a flowing narrative style, Wecht, a forensic pathologist and Kaufman, a true-crime reporter, give the reader the inside scoop of several recent high-profile deaths.
Since the Victorian era, then, Americans have been indulging their voyeuristic appetite for tales of true-crime mayhem through an accommodating media.
Within each of these subsystems, he uses varied cultural artifacts as illustrations: the fiction of Patricia Highsmith, the films of Alfred Hitchcock, the coverage of the infamous true-crime case "The West Memphis Three," and the deliberate emptiness of post-war Berlin architecture.
Entire industries revolve around them; they entertain us in a variety of ways while providing a handsome living for the FBI, true-crime writers, novelists, filmmakers, and television producers.
Fox had bought the rights to a true-crime book about Brandon Teena's murder and threatened a lawsuit, but Peirce, whose "passion was unimpeachable," had been to Nebraska and interviewed Lana Tisdale, Brandon's girlfriend.