truism


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tru·ism

 (tro͞o′ĭz′əm)
n.
A statement that is obviously true or that is often presented as true: "the truism that envy often masquerades as resentment" (John Rawls). See Synonyms at cliché.

tru·is′tic (tro͞o-ĭs′tĭk) adj.

truism

(ˈtruːɪzəm)
n
an obvious truth; platitude
[C18: from true + -ism]
truˈistic adj

tru•ism

(ˈtru ɪz əm)

n.
a self-evident, obvious truth, esp. a cliché.
[1700–10]
tru•is′tic, adj.

truism

a self-evident, obvious truth. — truistic, truistical, adj.
See also: Truth and Error
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.truism - an obvious truthtruism - an obvious truth      
true statement, truth - a true statement; "he told the truth"; "he thought of answering with the truth but he knew they wouldn't believe it"
banality, cliche, commonplace, platitude, bromide - a trite or obvious remark

truism

noun cliché, commonplace, platitude, axiom, stock phrase, trite saying the truism that nothing succeeds like success

truism

noun
A trite expression or idea:
Translations
sannhettruisme

truism

[ˈtruːɪzəm] N (= well-known truth) → perogrullada f (pej) (= cliché) → tópico m

truism

[ˈtruːɪzəm] n (= cliché) → truisme m, lieu m commun

truism

n (= obvious truth)Binsenwahrheit f; (= platitude)Plattitüde f, → Gemeinplatz m

truism

[ˈtruːɪzəm] nverità f inv lapalissiana
References in classic literature ?
Before an anchor can ever be raised, it must be let go; and this perfectly obvious truism brings me at once to the subject of the degradation of the sea language in the daily press of this country.
That it was intrinsically valuable was a truism I had never questioned.
I turned this truism over in my mind as, in the frosty dawn of a January morning, I hurried down the steep and now icy street which descended from Mrs.
He seems to think that the end of poetry is, or should be, instruction; yet it is a truism that the end of our existence is happiness; if so, the end of every separate part of our existence, everything connected with our existence, should be still happiness.
It has been a well-worn truism," said the Times, "that our human race are a feeble folk before the infinite latent forces which surround us.
They carry a truism so far--as in the French Revolution.
While there is life," he said, "there is hope," but he grinned as he voiced the ancient truism.
Though, indeed, the vendor of a certain nostrum has vulgarized the truism to the very point of contempt.
I echoed a sentiment that was generosity itself in Raffles, but in my case a mere truism.
But except for a short shudder Mrs Verloc remained apparently unaffected by the force of that terrible truism.
Aware of the impression he had made--few men were quicker than he at such discoveries--Mr Chester followed up the blow by propounding certain virtuous maxims, somewhat vague and general in their nature, doubtless, and occasionally partaking of the character of truisms, worn a little out at elbow, but delivered in so charming a voice and with such uncommon serenity and peace of mind, that they answered as well as the best.
A Truism Something we've known for a very long time But seldom is ever spoke You cannot give what you've never received That's understood by all good folk A smile, a hug and a kiss Are treats you have to learn From the cradle to the grave Sensations we all yearn You cannot say "I love you" Unless someone says it first How can you thank the Lord If no-one quenched that thirst?