trusted


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trust

 (trŭst)
n.
1.
a. Firm belief in the integrity, ability, or character of a person or thing; confidence or reliance: trying to gain our clients' trust; taking it on trust that our friend is telling the truth.
b. The condition and resulting obligation of having confidence placed in one: violated a public trust.
c. One in which confidence is placed.
2.
a. Custody; care: left her papers in my trust during her illness.
b. Something committed into the care of another; a charge: violated a public trust.
3.
a. Reliance on something in the future; hope: We have trust that the future will be better.
b. Reliance on the intention and ability of a purchaser to pay in the future; credit: bought the supplies on trust from a local dealer.
4. Law
a. A legal relationship in which one party holds a title to property while another party has the entitlement to the beneficial use of that property.
b. The confidence reposed in a trustee when giving the trustee legal title to property to administer for another, together with the trustee's obligation regarding that property and the beneficiary.
c. The property so held.
5. An institution or organization directed by trustees: a charitable trust.
6. A combination of firms or corporations for the purpose of reducing competition and controlling prices throughout a business or industry.
v. trust·ed, trust·ing, trusts
v.tr.
1.
a. To have or place confidence in; depend on: only trusted his friends; did not trust the strength of the thin rope; could not be trusted to oversee so much money.
b. To have confidence in allowing (someone) to use, know, or look after something: Can I trust you with a secret?
2. To expect with assurance; assume: I trust that you will be on time.
3. To give credence to; believe: I trust what you say.
4. To place in the care of another person or in a situation deemed safe; entrust: "the unfortunate souls who trusted their retirement savings to the stock" (Bill Barnhart).
5. To extend credit to.
v.intr.
1. To have or place reliance; depend: We can only trust in our guide's knowledge of the terrain.
2. To be confident; hope.
Idiom:
in trust
In the possession or care of a trustee.

[Middle English truste, perhaps from Old Norse traust, confidence; see deru- in Indo-European roots.]

trust′er n.
Synonyms: trust, faith, confidence, reliance
These nouns denote a feeling of certainty that a person or thing will not fail. Trust implies depth and assurance of feeling that is often based on inconclusive evidence: The mayor vowed to justify the trust the electorate had placed in him. Faith connotes unquestioning, often emotionally charged belief: "Often enough our faith beforehand in an uncertified result is the only thing that makes the result come true" (William James).
Confidence frequently implies stronger grounds for assurance: "The experience ... made me want to be a surgeon—not an amateur handed the knife for a brief moment but someone with the confidence and ability to proceed as if it were routine" (Atul Gawande).
Reliance connotes a confident and trustful commitment to another: "What reliance could they place on the protection of a prince so recently their enemy?" (William Hickling Prescott). See Also Synonyms at care, rely.

trusted

(ˈtrʌstɪd)
adj
regarded as honest and sincere
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.trusted - (of persons) worthy of trust or confidencetrusted - (of persons) worthy of trust or confidence; "a sure (or trusted) friend"
trustworthy, trusty - worthy of trust or belief; "a trustworthy report"; "an experienced and trustworthy traveling companion"
Translations

trusted

[ˈtrʌstɪd] ADJ [friend, adviser, servant] → de confianza; [formula] → probado
see also tried

trusted

[ˈtrʌstɪd] adj
a trusted friend → un ami et confident, un ami intime
a trusted adviser → un proche conseiller

trusted

adj methodbewährt; friend, servantgetreu

trusted

[ˈtrʌstɪd] adj (friend, adviser) → fidato/a
References in classic literature ?
I had saved above #100 more, but I met with a disaster with that, which was this--that a goldsmith in whose hands I had trusted it, broke, so I lost #70 of my money, the man's composition not making above #30 out of his #100.
A government, the constitution of which renders it unfit to be trusted with all the powers which a free people ought to delegate to any government, would be an unsafe and improper depositary of the NATIONAL INTERESTS.
One of the players said he hoped he might be trusted.
It is enough, for the present, that we trusted to an Indian guide to take us by a nearer, though blinder path, and that we are deceived in his knowledge.
Since you trusted yourself to the care of one of that nation, I only wonder that you have not fallen in with more.
They will make him petticoats, and bid him stay in the wigwam with the women, for he is no longer to be trusted with the business of a man.
Your ongoing commitment to resolving the situation will clearly demonstrate that you are a trusted leader.
Donors often prefer making gifts in trust for the benefit of family members, rather than gifting them outright, especially when the potential donees are minors or individuals who cannot presently be trusted to effectively manage a gift.
If the trust provides for the sale of assets, as opposed to distribution of the assets to a qualified family member to continue the business, the owner should consider naming, as successor trustee with respect to the assets, a trusted adviser who is capable of having the assets valued and sold with the least disruption to the business.
We must make sound judgments about trusting others and make efforts to be trusted.
Continuing its efforts to provide building blocks for the trusted enterprise, the Trusted Computing Group (TCG) today announced a specification for trusted servers.