trusted


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trust

 (trŭst)
n.
1.
a. Firm belief in the integrity, ability, or character of a person or thing; confidence or reliance: trying to gain our clients' trust; taking it on trust that our friend is telling the truth.
b. The condition and resulting obligation of having confidence placed in one: violated a public trust.
c. One in which confidence is placed.
2.
a. Custody; care: left her papers in my trust during her illness.
b. Something committed into the care of another; a charge: violated a public trust.
3.
a. Reliance on something in the future; hope: We have trust that the future will be better.
b. Reliance on the intention and ability of a purchaser to pay in the future; credit: bought the supplies on trust from a local dealer.
4. Law
a. A legal relationship in which one party holds a title to property while another party has the entitlement to the beneficial use of that property.
b. The confidence reposed in a trustee when giving the trustee legal title to property to administer for another, together with the trustee's obligation regarding that property and the beneficiary.
c. The property so held.
5. An institution or organization directed by trustees: a charitable trust.
6. A combination of firms or corporations for the purpose of reducing competition and controlling prices throughout a business or industry.
v. trust·ed, trust·ing, trusts
v.tr.
1.
a. To have or place confidence in; depend on: only trusted his friends; did not trust the strength of the thin rope; could not be trusted to oversee so much money.
b. To have confidence in allowing (someone) to use, know, or look after something: Can I trust you with a secret?
2. To expect with assurance; assume: I trust that you will be on time.
3. To give credence to; believe: I trust what you say.
4. To place in the care of another person or in a situation deemed safe; entrust: "the unfortunate souls who trusted their retirement savings to the stock" (Bill Barnhart).
5. To extend credit to.
v.intr.
1. To have or place reliance; depend: We can only trust in our guide's knowledge of the terrain.
2. To be confident; hope.
Idiom:
in trust
In the possession or care of a trustee.

[Middle English truste, perhaps from Old Norse traust, confidence; see deru- in Indo-European roots.]

trust′er n.
Synonyms: trust, faith, confidence, reliance
These nouns denote a feeling of certainty that a person or thing will not fail. Trust implies depth and assurance of feeling that is often based on inconclusive evidence: The mayor vowed to justify the trust the electorate had placed in him. Faith connotes unquestioning, often emotionally charged belief: "Often enough our faith beforehand in an uncertified result is the only thing that makes the result come true" (William James).
Confidence frequently implies stronger grounds for assurance: "The experience ... made me want to be a surgeon—not an amateur handed the knife for a brief moment but someone with the confidence and ability to proceed as if it were routine" (Atul Gawande).
Reliance connotes a confident and trustful commitment to another: "What reliance could they place on the protection of a prince so recently their enemy?" (William Hickling Prescott). See Also Synonyms at care, rely.

trusted

(ˈtrʌstɪd)
adj
regarded as honest and sincere
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.trusted - (of persons) worthy of trust or confidencetrusted - (of persons) worthy of trust or confidence; "a sure (or trusted) friend"
trustworthy, trusty - worthy of trust or belief; "a trustworthy report"; "an experienced and trustworthy traveling companion"
Translations

trusted

[ˈtrʌstɪd] ADJ [friend, adviser, servant] → de confianza; [formula] → probado
see also tried

trusted

[ˈtrʌstɪd] adj
a trusted friend → un ami et confident, un ami intime
a trusted adviser → un proche conseiller

trusted

adj methodbewährt; friend, servantgetreu

trusted

[ˈtrʌstɪd] adj (friend, adviser) → fidato/a
References in classic literature ?
Her father called her `Little Miss Tranquility', and the name suited her excellently, for she seemed to live in a happy world of her own, only venturing out to meet the few whom she trusted and loved.
She trusted she did them no injustice in thus condemning them as a race.
It is enough, for the present, that we trusted to an Indian guide to take us by a nearer, though blinder path, and that we are deceived in his knowledge.
He knew he could not escape recognition, his face was too well known, but, he trusted, for the sake of Spear, the reporters would make no display of his visit.
That afternoon Phoebe found a diminutive egg,--not in the regular nest, it was far too precious to be trusted there,--but cunningly hidden under the currant-bushes, on some dry stalks of last year's grass.
To make himself the one trusted friend, to whom should be confided all the fear, the remorse, the agony, the ineffectual repentance, the backward rush of sinful thoughts, expelled in vain
When I said to myself: "THEY have the manners to be silent, and you, trusted as you are, the baseness to speak
One was Justice, a roan cob, used for riding or for the luggage cart; the other was an old brown hunter, named Sir Oliver; he was past work now, but was a great favorite with the master, who gave him the run of the park; he sometimes did a little light carting on the estate, or carried one of the young ladies when they rode out with their father, for he was very gentle and could be trusted with a child as well as Merrylegs.
So long he had hungered to possess her, but now that the time had come he knew that he had not earned the right; that she trusted him so was all her own simple goodness, and no virtue of his.
I've trusted him, since then, with everything I have,--money, house, horses,--and let him come and go round the country; and I always found him true and square in everything.
I saw to what extent the people among whom I lived could be trusted as good neighbors and friends; that their friendship was for summer weather only; that they did not greatly propose to do right; that they were a distinct race from me by their prejudices and superstitions, as the Chinamen and Malays are that in their sacrifices to humanity they ran no risks, not even to their property; that after all they were not so noble but they treated the thief as he had treated them, and hoped, by a certain outward observance and a few prayers, and by walking in a particular straight through useless path from time to time, to save their souls.
A man in armor always trusted to chance for his food on a journey, and would have been scandalized at the idea of hanging a basket of sandwiches on his spear.