truth


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truth

 (tro͞oth)
n. pl. truths (tro͞othz, tro͞oths)
1.
a. Conformity to fact or actuality: Does this story have any truth?
b. Reality; actuality: In truth, he was not qualified for the job.
c. The reality of a situation: The truth is, she respects your work.
2.
a. A statement proven to be or accepted as true: truths about nature.
b. Such statements considered as a group: researchers in pursuit of truth.
3. Sincerity; integrity: the truth of his intentions.
4. Fidelity to an original or standard: the truth of the copy.
5. Theology & Philosophy That which is considered to be the ultimate ground of reality.

[Middle English trewthe, loyalty, from Old English trēowth; see deru- in Indo-European roots.]
Synonyms: truth, veracity, verity, verisimilitude
These nouns refer to the quality of being in accord with fact or reality. Truth is a comprehensive term that in all of its nuances implies accuracy and honesty: "We seek the truth, and will endure the consequences" (Charles Seymour).
Veracity is adherence to the truth: "Veracity is the heart of morality" (Thomas H. Huxley).
Verity often applies to an enduring or repeatedly demonstrated truth: "beliefs that were accepted as eternal verities" (James Harvey Robinson).
Verisimilitude is the quality of having the appearance of truth or reality: "merely corroborative detail, intended to give artistic verisimilitude to an otherwise bald and unconvincing narrative" (W.S. Gilbert).

truth

(truːθ)
n
1. the quality of being true, genuine, actual, or factual: the truth of his statement was attested.
2. something that is true as opposed to false: you did not tell me the truth.
3. a proven or verified principle or statement; fact: the truths of astronomy.
4. (usually plural) a system of concepts purporting to represent some aspect of the world: the truths of ancient religions.
5. fidelity to a required standard or law
6. faithful reproduction or portrayal: the truth of a portrait.
7. an obvious fact; truism; platitude
8. honesty, reliability, or veracity: the truth of her nature.
9. accuracy, as in the setting, adjustment, or position of something, such as a mechanical instrument
10. the state or quality of being faithful; allegiance
[Old English triewth; related to Old High German gitriuwida fidelity, Old Norse tryggr true]
ˈtruthless adj

truth

(truθ)

n., pl. truths (tro̅o̅tz, tro̅o̅ths).
1. the true or actual state of a matter: to tell the truth.
2. conformity with fact or reality; verity: to check the truth of a statement.
3. a verified or indisputable fact, proposition, principle, or the like: mathematical truths.
4. the state or character of being true.
5. actuality or actual existence.
6. an obvious or accepted fact; truism; platitude.
7. honesty; integrity; truthfulness.
8. (often cap.) ideal or fundamental reality apart from and transcending perceived experience.
9. agreement with a standard or original.
10. accuracy, as of position or adjustment.
11. Archaic. fidelity or constancy.
Idioms:
in truth, in reality; in fact; actually.
[before 900; Middle English treuthe, Old English trēowth. See true, -th1]
truth′less, adj.

Truth

(truθ)

n.
Sojourner (Isabella Van Wagener), 1797?–1883, U.S. abolitionist and women's-rights advocate, born a slave.

Truth

 

See Also: CANDOR, HONESTY

  1. All the durable truths that have come into the world within historic times have been opposed as bitterly as if they were so many waves of smallpox —H. L. Mencken
  2. As with the pursuit of happiness, the pursuit of truth is itself gratifying whereas the consummation often turns out to be elusive —Richard Hofstadter
  3. Honest as the skin between his brows —William Shakespeare
  4. Plain truths, like plain dishes, are commended by everybody, and everybody leaves them whole —Walter Savage Landor
  5. Pure truth, like pure gold, has been found unfit for circulation, because men have discovered that it is far more convenient to adulterate the truth than to refine themselves —Charles Caleb Colton
  6. Random truths are all I find stuck like burrs about my mind —Phyllis McGinley
  7. Rich honesty dwells like a miser … in a poor house; as your pearl in your foul oyster —William Shakespeare
  8. Speaking the truth is like writing well, and only comes with practice —John Ruskin

    This has been modernized from “The truth is like writing”

  9. Truth … drag it out and beat it like a carpet —Hortense Calisher
  10. Truth is a cow which will yield such people no more milk, and so they are gone to milk the bull —Samuel Johnson
  11. Truth is as difficult to lay hold on as air —Walter Savage Landor

    See Also: ELUSIVENESS

  12. Truth is as old as God —Emily Dickinson
  13. The truth is cold, as a giant’s knee will seem cold —John Ashbery
  14. Truth is impossible to be soiled by any outward touch as the sunbeam —John Milton
  15. Truth … is not a thing to be thrown about loosely, like small change; it is something to be cherished and hoarded and disbursed only when absolutely necessary —H. L. Mencken
  16. The truth is tough. It will not break, like a bubble, at a touch … you may kick it about all day, like a football, and it will be round and full at evening —Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.
  17. The truth kept wandering in and out of her mind like a lost child, never pausing long enough to be identified —Margaret Millar
  18. Truth, like a bird, is ever poised for flight at man’s approach —Jean Brown
  19. Truth, like a gentle shower, soaks through the ears and moistens the intellect —Anon
  20. Truth, like a point or line, requires an acuteness and intention to its discovery —Joseph Glanville
  21. Truth, like a suit of armor, stubbornly resists all attempts to penetrate it —Robert Traver

    In his novel, People Versus Kirk, Traver continues the simile with “… while the lie, under probing, almost invariably reveals some chinks and cracks.”

  22. Truth is like a torch, the more it is shook, the more it shines —Sir William Hamilton

    Modernized from “The more ’tis shook, it shines.”

  23. Truth, like gold, is not less so for being newly brought out of the mine —John Locke
  24. Truth, like light, blinds —Albert Camus

    Camus prefaces his simile from The Fall as follows: “Sometimes it is easier to see clearly into the liar than into the man who tells the truth.”

  25. Truth, like the juice of the poppy, in small quantities, calms men; in larger, heats and irritates them, and is attended by fatal consequences in its excess —Walter Savage Landor
  26. Truth’s like a fire, and will burn through and be seen —Maxwell Anderson
  27. A truth’s prosperity is like a jest’s; it lies in the ear of him that hears it —Samuel Butler
  28. The way of truth is like a great highway. It is not hard to find —Mencius
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.truth - a fact that has been verifiedtruth - a fact that has been verified; "at last he knew the truth"; "the truth is that he didn't want to do it"
fact - a piece of information about circumstances that exist or events that have occurred; "first you must collect all the facts of the case"
home truth - an important truth that is unpleasant to acknowledge (as about yourself)
verity - an enduring or necessary ethical or religious or aesthetic truth
2.truth - conformity to reality or actuality; "they debated the truth of the proposition"; "the situation brought home to us the blunt truth of the military threat"; "he was famous for the truth of his portraits"; "he turned to religion in his search for eternal verities"
actuality - the state of actually existing objectively; "a hope that progressed from possibility to actuality"
falseness, falsity - the state of being false or untrue; "argument could not determine its truth or falsity"
3.truth - a true statementtruth - a true statement; "he told the truth"; "he thought of answering with the truth but he knew they wouldn't believe it"
statement - a message that is stated or declared; a communication (oral or written) setting forth particulars or facts etc; "according to his statement he was in London on that day"
gospel truth, gospel - an unquestionable truth; "his word was gospel"
tautology - (logic) a statement that is necessarily true; "the statement `he is brave or he is not brave' is a tautology"
truism - an obvious truth
falsehood, untruth, falsity - a false statement
4.truth - the quality of being near to the true valuetruth - the quality of being near to the true value; "he was beginning to doubt the accuracy of his compass"; "the lawyer questioned the truth of my account"
quality - an essential and distinguishing attribute of something or someone; "the quality of mercy is not strained"--Shakespeare
exactitude, exactness - the quality of being exact; "he demanded exactness in all details"; "a man of great exactitude"
fidelity - accuracy with which an electronic system reproduces the sound or image of its input signal
5.truth - United States abolitionist and feminist who was freed from slavery and became a leading advocate of the abolition of slavery and for the rights of women (1797-1883)Truth - United States abolitionist and feminist who was freed from slavery and became a leading advocate of the abolition of slavery and for the rights of women (1797-1883)

truth

noun
1. reality, fact(s), real life, actuality Is it possible to separate truth from fiction?
reality unreality, lie, legend, fiction, myth, invention, delusion, fabrication, make-believe, falsehood, untruth, old wives' tale
3. fact, law, reality, certainty, maxim, verity, axiom, truism, proven principle It's a universal truth that we all die eventually.
4. the fact of the matter, what really happened, gospel truth, God's truth, the honest truth, the case I must tell you the truth about this.
5. honesty, principle, honour, virtue, integrity, goodness, righteousness, candour, frankness, probity, rectitude, incorruptibility, uprightness His mission is to uphold truth, justice and the American way.
honesty deception, deceit, dishonesty
in truth actually, really, in fact, in reality, as a matter of fact, to tell the truth, in actual fact, in point of fact, if truth be told In truth, we were both unhappy.
Related words
adjectives veritable, veracious
Quotations
"Truth sits upon the lips of dying men" [Matthew Arnold Sohrab and Rustum]
"Beauty and Truth, though never found, are worthy to be sought" [Robert Williams Buchanan To David in Heaven]
"`Beauty is truth, truth beauty,' - that is all"
"Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know"
"That is all" [John Keats Ode on a Grecian Urn]
"What is truth? said jesting Pilate; and would not stay for an answer" [Francis Bacon Essays]
"Truth can never be told so as to be understood, and not believed" [William Blake Proverbs of Hell]
"Truth never hurts the teller" [Robert Browning Fifine at the Fair]
"Truth is within ourselves" [Robert Browning Paracelsus]
"'Tis strange - but true; for truth is always strange;"
"Stranger than fiction" [Lord Byron Don Juan]
"I maintain that Truth is a pathless land, and you cannot approach it by any path whatsoever, by any religion, by any sect" [Jiddu Krishnamurti speech]
"It is the customary fate of new truths to begin as heresies and to end as superstitions" [T.H. Huxley Science and Culture]
"The first casualty when war comes is truth" [Philander Chase Johnson Shooting Stars]
"There was things that he stretched, but mainly he told the truth" [Mark Twain The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn]
"The truth is rarely pure, and never simple" [Oscar Wilde The Importance of Being Earnest]
"The truth is a terrible weapon of aggression. It is possible to lie, and even to murder, for the truth" [Alfred Adler The Problem of Neurosis]
"The truth which makes men free is for the most part the truth which men prefer not to hear" [Herbert Agar A Time for Greatness]
"When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth" [Sir Arthur Conan Doyle The Sign of Four]
"The truth shall make you free" Bible: St. John
"When you want to fool the world, tell the truth" [Otto von Bismarck]
"It is always the best policy to speak the truth, unless of course you are an exceptionally good liar" [Jerome K. Jerome]
"Irrationally held truths may be more harmful than reasoned errors" [T.H. Huxley Science and Culture and Other Essays]
"Truth is the cry of all, but the game of the few" [Bishop George Berkeley Siris]
"Truth lies within a little and certain compass, but error is immense" [Henry St. John, 1st Viscount Bolingbroke Reflections upon Exile]
Proverbs
"There is truth in wine (in vino veritas)"

truth

noun
2. Freedom from deceit or falseness:
3. The quality of being actual or factual:
Translations
حَقِيقَةحَقيقَهصِدْق، صِحَّه
pravdapravdivostskutečnost
sandhedsandfærdighed
totuus
istina
sannleikur
事実
진실
ištikimybė tiesaipasakyti tiesąsakantis tiesąsakyti tiesą
patiesībataisnība
sannhetsanning
resnica
sanning
ความจริง
sự thật

truth

[truːθ] (truths (pl)) [truːðz]
A. Nverdad f
there is some truth in thishay una parte de verdad en esto
in truthen verdad, a la verdad
the plain truthla pura verdad, la verdad lisa y llana
the whole truthtoda la verdad
to tell the truthdecir la verdad
to tell (you) the truth; truth to tella decir verdad
the truth of the matter is thatsi te digo la verdad or la verdad es que ...
the truth hurtslas verdades duelen
truth will outno hay mentira que no salga
truth is stranger than fictionla realidad sobrepasa a la ficción
see also home
B. CPD truth drug Nsuero m de la verdad

truth

[ˈtruːθ] [truths] [ˈtruːðz] (pl) n
(= real facts) → vérité f
I want you to tell me the truth → Je veux que tu me dises la vérité.
No one knows the whole truth → Personne ne connaît toute la vérité.
to tell you the truth (= to be honest) → à vrai dire
(= truthfulness) → vérité f
There is an element of truth in it → Il y a une part de vérité là-dedans.
There is no truth in the story → Il n'y a rien de vrai dans l'histoire.
(= something believed to be true) → vérité f
universal truths → vérités universelles

truth

n pl <-s>
no plWahrheit f; you must always tell the truthdu musst immer die Wahrheit sagen; to tell the truth …, truth to tell …um ehrlich zu sein …, um die Wahrheit zu sagen; the truth of it or the matter is that …die Wahrheit ist dass …, in Wahrheit; there’s no truth or or not a word of truth in what he sayses ist kein Wort wahr von dem, was er sagt; there’s some truth in thates ist etwas Wahres daran, da ist etwas Wahres dran (inf); the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth (Jur) → die Wahrheit, die reine Wahrheit und nichts als die Wahrheit; in truthin Wahrheit, in Wirklichkeit; truth will out (prov) → die Wahrheit wird ans Licht kommen, die Sonne wird es an den Tag bringen (prov)
(= belief, fact)Wahrheit f ? home truth

truth

[truːθ] nverità f inv
to tell the truth → dire la verità
to tell (you) the truth, truth to tell → a dire il vero or la verità
the truth of the matter is that ... → la verità è che...
the truth hurts → la verità fa male
there is some truth in what he says → c'è del vero in ciò che dice
there isn't a word of truth in it → non c'è nulla di vero
truth will out → la verità viene sempre a galla

truth

(truːθ) plural truths (truːθz truːθs) noun
1. trueness; the state of being true. I am certain of the truth of his story; `What is truth?' asked the philosopher.
2. the true facts. I don't know, and that's the truth; Tell the truth about it.
ˈtruthful adjective
(negative untruthful).
1. (of a person) telling the truth. She's a truthful child.
2. true. a truthful account of what happened.
ˈtruthfully adverb
ˈtruthfulness noun
tell the truth
to confess or make a true statement.
to tell the truth
really; actually. To tell the truth I forgot it was your birthday last week.

truth

حَقِيقَة pravda sandhed Wahrheit αλήθεια verdad totuus vérité istina verità 事実 진실 waarheid sannhet prawda verdade истина sanning ความจริง gerçek sự thật 真理

truth

n. verdad; realidad;
___ serumsuero de la ___.
References in classic literature ?
In fact it was an immense relief to them all to have a little work, and they took hold with a will, but soon realized the truth of Hannah's saying, "Housekeeping ain't no joke.
Man made the truths himself and each truth was a composite of a great many vague thoughts.
The truth of the matter was that he was still thinking deeply of the visit of Professor Beecher to Mary Nestor, and wondering what it portended.
The pale, cold light of the winter sunset did not beautify--it was like the light of truth itself.
Perhaps it was the first time she was ready, perhaps the first time her being was tempered to take an impress of the abiding truth.
Whatever may be the truth, as respects the root and the genius of the Indian tongues, it is quite certain they are now so distinct in their words as to possess most of the disadvantages of strange languages; hence much of the embarrassment that has arisen in learning their histories, and most of the uncertainty which exists in their traditions.
One of Andrew's superior officers -- a certain Major Kirke, if I remember right -found him in his quarters, writing to his father a confession of the disgraceful truth, with a loaded pistol by his side.
The canon, replying to Don Quixote, said, "In truth, brother, I know more about books of chivalry than I do about Villalpando's elements of logic; so if that be all, you may safely tell me what you please.
And in this it is not likely that all are mistaken the conviction is rather to be held as testifying that the power of judging aright and of distinguishing truth from error, which is properly what is called good sense or reason, is by nature equal in all men; and that the diversity of our opinions, consequently, does not arise from some being endowed with a larger share of reason than others, but solely from this, that we conduct our thoughts along different ways, and do not fix our attention on the same objects.
Well, as I was saying, they have scarcely spoken the truth at all; but from me you shall hear the whole truth: not, however, delivered after their manner in a set oration duly ornamented with words and phrases.
If there be any truth in the remark, the crisis at which we are arrived may with propriety be regarded as the era in which that decision is to be made; and a wrong election of the part we shall act may, in this view, deserve to be considered as the general misfortune of mankind.
I declared that I could say nothing more, and that I must commit myself to the Truth, whose cause would surely prevail in the end.