trying


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Related to trying: trying times

try·ing

 (trī′ĭng)
adj.
Causing strain, hardship, or distress.

try′ing·ly adv.

trying

(ˈtraɪɪŋ)
adj
upsetting, difficult, or annoying: a trying day at the office.
ˈtryingly adv
ˈtryingness n

try•ing

(ˈtraɪ ɪŋ)

adj.
straining one's patience and goodwill; annoying, difficult, or irritating.
[1710–20]
try′ing•ly, adv.
try′ing•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.trying - hard to enduretrying - hard to endure; "fell upon trying times"
difficult, hard - not easy; requiring great physical or mental effort to accomplish or comprehend or endure; "a difficult task"; "nesting places on the cliffs are difficult of access"; "difficult times"; "why is it so hard for you to keep a secret?"
2.trying - extremely irritating to the nervestrying - extremely irritating to the nerves; "nerve-racking noise"; "the stressful days before a war"; "a trying day at the office"
disagreeable - not to your liking; "a disagreeable situation"

trying

trying

adjective
Requiring great or extreme bodily, mental, or spiritual strength:
Translations
شاقمُتْعِب
otravnýúmorný
idegekre menõ
òreytandi, erfiîursem reynir á òolrifinn; òreytandi
úmorný
bıktırıcıcan sıkıcısabır taşıranzor

trying

[ˈtraɪɪŋ] ADJ [time, situation, circumstances] → difícil; [experience, day] → duro; [person] → latoso, pesado

trying

[ˈtraɪɪŋ] adjpénibletry line tryline [ˈtraɪlaɪn] n (RUGBY)ligne f de but, ligne f d'essai

trying

adjschwierig, anstrengend; work, day, timeanstrengend, aufreibend; experienceschwer; it has been a trying time for them recentlysie haben es in letzter Zeit sehr schwer gehabt; how trying!wie ärgerlich!

trying

[ˈtraɪɪŋ] adj (tiring, situation, time) → difficile, duro/a; (day, experience) → logorante, pesante; (tiresome, person) → noiso/a, seccante; (child) → insopportabile
to have a trying time → passare un periodo difficile

try

(trai) verb
1. to attempt or make an effort (to do, get etc). He tried to answer the questions; Let's try and climb that tree!
2. to test; to make an experiment (with) in order to find out whether something will be successful, satisfactory etc. She tried washing her hair with a new shampoo; Try one of these sweets.
3. to judge (someone or their case) in a court of law. The prisoners were tried for murder.
4. to test the limits of; to strain. You are trying my patience.
nounplural tries
1. an attempt or effort. Have a try (at the exam). I'm sure you will pass.
2. in rugby football, an act of putting the ball on the ground behind the opponents' goal-line. Our team scored three tries.
ˈtrier noun
a person who keeps on trying, who does not give up. He's not very good, but he's a trier.
ˈtrying adjective
1. difficult; causing strain or anxiety. Having to stay such a long time in hospital must be very trying.
2. (of people) stretching one's patience to the limit; annoying. She's a very trying woman!
try on
to put on (clothes etc) to see if they fit. She tried on a new hat.
try out
to test (something) by using it. We are trying out new teaching methods.
References in classic literature ?
I did not give up trying to read, as usual, and part of my endeavor that winter was with Schiller, and Uhland, and even Goethe, whose 'Wahlverwandschaften,' hardly yielded up its mystery to me.
I shall maybe do some mowing myself too," he said trying not to be embarrassed.
The grass became softer, and Levin, listening without answering, followed Tit, trying to do the best he could.
Now if there is anything mortifying to out feelings when we are young, it is to be told that, and to be bidden to "run away, dear" is still more trying to us.
He shrugged his shoulders, and threw it into her lap, trying to look cool and careless, but failing entirely, for he was ashamed of himself, and out of sorts generally.
There are so many I would like to make," said Cecily, "that I'm afraid it wouldn't be any use trying to keep them all.
Here puss showed an amiable desire to forgive and forget, and Polly took her up, saying aloud: "Puttel, when missis abuses you, play it 's dyspepsia, and don't bear malice, because it 's a very trying disease, my dear.
I see I was weakening; so I just give up trying, and up and says:
Alice remained looking thoughtfully at the mushroom for a minute, trying to make out which were the two sides of it; and as it was perfectly round, she found this a very difficult question.
The next day glided away, pleasantly enough, partly in settling myself in my new quarters, and partly in strolling round the neighbourhood, under Arthur's guidance, and trying to form a general idea of Elveston and its inhabitants.
While he was absorbed in these reflections, Cecilia--embarrassed by the silence--was trying to find a topic of conversation.
There was a "run on the bank," they told her then, but she did not know what that was, and turned from one person to another, trying in an agony of fear to make out what they meant.