trypsinogen


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tryp·sin·o·gen

 (trĭp-sĭn′ə-jən)
n.
The inactive precursor of trypsin, produced by the pancreas and converted to trypsin in the small intestine by enterokinase.

trypsinogen

(trɪpˈsɪnədʒən)
n
(Biochemistry) the inactive precursor of trypsin that is converted to trypsin by the enzyme enterokinase

tryp•sin•o•gen

(trɪpˈsɪn ə dʒən, -ˌdʒɛn)

n.
a precursor of trypsin that is secreted by the pancreas and converted to trypsin in the small intestine.
[1885–90]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.trypsinogen - inactive precursor of trypsin; a substance secreted by the pancreas and converted to active trypsin by enterokinase in the small intestine
trypsin - an enzyme of pancreatic origin; catalyzes the hydrolysis of proteins to smaller polypeptide units
Translations

tryp·sin·o·gen

n. tripsinógeno, sustancia inactiva segregada por el páncreas en el intestino convertida en tripsina.
References in periodicals archive ?
98) In these studies it was found that various pancreatitis-associated mutations of PRSS1 gene (the gene encoding the main form of trypsinogen, cationic trypsinogen) lead to a form of trypsinogen that is subject to inappropriate activation or to resistance to intra-cellular degradation after inadvertently activation.
Another protective mechanism to prevent the premature activation of trypsinogen to trypsin inside the pancreatic duct is rapidly sweeping out zymogens from the pancreas.
Effect of calcium and phytic acid on the activation of trypsinogen and the stability of trypsin.
Once released into the intestine, enteropeptidase in the intestinal mucosal cells cleaves trypsinogen into the active form trypsin.
Acute pancreatitis is initiated when hyperstimulation exceeds the intrapancreatic protective mechanisms that prevent trypsinogen activation or reduce the activity of trypsin: such mechanisms include enzymes stored as zymogen granules, low intracellular ionized calcium concentrations, a pressure gradient that favors the flow from the pancreas towards the duodenum, secretion of pancreatic enzymes in an inactive form (proenzymes), and enzymes that activate the zymogen outside the pancreas and synthesis of specific trypsin inhibitors by acinar cells (17,18).
1) Neonatal screening for CF began in 1979 with elevated immunoreactive trypsinogen in the dried blood spots of newborns.
One of the earlier stages noted is- the colocalization of digestive enzyme zymogen such as trypsinogen with lysosomal hydrolases such as cathepsin B inside cytoprasmic vacuoles.
Eighty to 95% of the pancreatic parenchyma is composed of acinar cells, which are dedicated to the exocrine functions of producing and secreting digestive enzymes, such as trypsinogen, lipase.
NFAT, and especially the variant NFATc3, were found to regulate the activity of trypsinogen (a precursor form of the digestive enzyme trypsin), which can affect the risk of acute pancreatitis.
It converts trypsinogen to trypsin, indirectly activating a number of pancreatic digestive enzymes.
Screening tests include sweat conductivity measurement and newborn testing for immunoreactive trypsinogen (universal screening is not currently done in South Africa).