tuck


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Related to tuck: tuck up

tuck 1

 (tŭk)
v. tucked, tuck·ing, tucks
v.tr.
1.
a. To thrust or fold the edge of so as to secure or confine: He tucked his shirt into his pants. I tucked the blanket under the mattress.
b. To wrap or cover snugly, as by tucking a blanket: tucked the baby in bed.
c. To make one or more folds in: tucked the pleats before sewing the hem.
2.
a. To put in an out-of-the-way, snug place: a cabin that was tucked among the pines.
b. To store in a safe spot; save: tuck away a bit of lace; tuck away millions.
3.
a. To draw in; contract: He tucked his chin into his chest.
b. Sports To bring (a body part) into a tuck position.
v.intr.
To make tucks.
n.
1. The act of tucking.
2. A flattened pleat or fold, especially a very narrow one stitched in place.
3. Nautical The part of a ship's hull under the stern where the ends of the bottom planks come together.
4. Sports
a. A body position used in some sports, such as diving, in which the knees are bent and the thighs are drawn close to the chest, with the hands often clasped around the shins.
b. A position in skiing in which the skier squats, often while holding the poles parallel to the ground and under the arms.
5. Informal A cosmetic surgical procedure in which skin or fat is removed, sometimes accompanied by muscle tightening, to create a slimmer or more youthful appearance.
6. Chiefly British Food, especially sweets and pastry.
Phrasal Verbs:
tuck away (or into) Informal
To consume (food) heartily.
tuck in
To make (a child, for example) secure in bed for sleep, especially by tucking bedclothes into the bed.

[Middle English tuken, possibly from Middle Low German or Middle Dutch tocken, tucken.]

tuck 2

 (tŭk)
n.
A beat or tap, especially on a drum.

[From Middle English tukken, to beat a drum, from Old North French toquer, to strike, from Vulgar Latin *toccāre.]

tuck 3

 (tŭk)
n. Archaic
A slender sword; a rapier.

[Perhaps from French dialectal étoc, from Old French estoc, of Germanic origin.]

tuck 4

 (tŭk)
n. Archaic
Energy; vigor.

[Origin unknown.]

tuck

(tʌk)
vb
1. (tr) to push or fold into a small confined space or concealed place or between two surfaces: to tuck a letter into an envelope.
2. (tr) to thrust the loose ends or sides of (something) into a confining space, so as to make neat and secure: to tuck the sheets under the mattress.
3. (Knitting & Sewing) to make a tuck or tucks in (a garment)
4. (usually tr) to draw together, contract, or pucker
n
5. a tucked object or part
6. (Knitting & Sewing) a pleat or fold in a part of a garment, usually stitched down so as to make it a better fit or as decoration
7. (Nautical Terms) the part of a vessel where the after ends of the planking or plating meet at the sternpost
8. (Cookery)
a. an informal or schoolchild's word for food, esp cakes and sweets
b. (as modifier): a tuck box.
9. (Swimming, Water Sports & Surfing) a position of the body in certain dives in which the legs are bent with the knees drawn up against the chest and tightly clasped
[C14: from Old English tūcian to torment; related to Middle Dutch tucken to tug, Old High German zucchen to twitch]

tuck

(tʌk)
n
(Arms & Armour (excluding Firearms)) archaic a rapier
[C16: from French estoc sword, from Old French: tree trunk, sword, of Germanic origin]

tuck

(tʌk)
n
a touch, blow, or stroke
vb
1. (tr) to touch or strike
2. (intr) to throb or bump
[C16: from Middle English tukken to beat a drum, from Old Northern French toquer to touch; compare tucket]

Tuck

(tʌk)
n
(European Myth & Legend) See Friar Tuck

tuck1

(tʌk)

v.t.
1. to put into a small, close, or concealing place: Tuck the money into your wallet; a house tucked away in the woods.
2. to thrust in the loose end or edge of so as to hold closely in place: Tuck in your blouse.
3. to cover snugly in or as if in this manner: She tucked the children into bed.
4. to draw or pull up into a fold or a folded arrangement: to tuck up one's skirts.
5. to sew tucks in.
6. Informal. to eat or drink: to tuck away a big meal.
v.i.
7. to draw together; contract; pucker.
8. to make tucks.
9. to fit securely or snugly.
10. tuck into, to eat or start to eat with enthusiasm.
n.
11. something tucked or folded in.
12. a fold made by doubling cloth upon itself and stitching parallel with the edge of the fold.
13. a body position in diving and gymnastics in which the head is lowered and the knees and thighs held against the chest.
14. a crouching position in skiing in which the ski poles are held close to the chest.
15. Informal. a plastic surgery operation: an ear tuck; a tummy tuck.
16. Brit. food, esp. sweets.
[before 900; Middle English t(o)uken to stretch (cloth), torment, Old English tūcian to torment; akin to Middle Dutch, Middle Low German tucken to tug, Old High German zucchen to jerk (akin to tow1)]

tuck3

(tʌk)

n. Archaic.
a rapier.
[1500–10; earlier tocke]

tuck4

(tʌk)

n. Chiefly Scot.
a drumbeat.
[1300–50; Middle English tukken to beat, sound]

tuck


Past participle: tucked
Gerund: tucking

Imperative
tuck
tuck
Present
I tuck
you tuck
he/she/it tucks
we tuck
you tuck
they tuck
Preterite
I tucked
you tucked
he/she/it tucked
we tucked
you tucked
they tucked
Present Continuous
I am tucking
you are tucking
he/she/it is tucking
we are tucking
you are tucking
they are tucking
Present Perfect
I have tucked
you have tucked
he/she/it has tucked
we have tucked
you have tucked
they have tucked
Past Continuous
I was tucking
you were tucking
he/she/it was tucking
we were tucking
you were tucking
they were tucking
Past Perfect
I had tucked
you had tucked
he/she/it had tucked
we had tucked
you had tucked
they had tucked
Future
I will tuck
you will tuck
he/she/it will tuck
we will tuck
you will tuck
they will tuck
Future Perfect
I will have tucked
you will have tucked
he/she/it will have tucked
we will have tucked
you will have tucked
they will have tucked
Future Continuous
I will be tucking
you will be tucking
he/she/it will be tucking
we will be tucking
you will be tucking
they will be tucking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been tucking
you have been tucking
he/she/it has been tucking
we have been tucking
you have been tucking
they have been tucking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been tucking
you will have been tucking
he/she/it will have been tucking
we will have been tucking
you will have been tucking
they will have been tucking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been tucking
you had been tucking
he/she/it had been tucking
we had been tucking
you had been tucking
they had been tucking
Conditional
I would tuck
you would tuck
he/she/it would tuck
we would tuck
you would tuck
they would tuck
Past Conditional
I would have tucked
you would have tucked
he/she/it would have tucked
we would have tucked
you would have tucked
they would have tucked
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tuck - eatables (especially sweets)tuck - eatables (especially sweets)  
comestible, eatable, edible, pabulum, victual, victuals - any substance that can be used as food
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
2.tuck - (sports) a bodily position adopted in some sports (such as diving or skiing) in which the knees are bent and the thighs are drawn close to the chesttuck - (sports) a bodily position adopted in some sports (such as diving or skiing) in which the knees are bent and the thighs are drawn close to the chest
athletics, sport - an active diversion requiring physical exertion and competition
posture, attitude, position - the arrangement of the body and its limbs; "he assumed an attitude of surrender"
3.tuck - a narrow flattened pleat or fold that is stitched in placetuck - a narrow flattened pleat or fold that is stitched in place
dart - a tapered tuck made in dressmaking
pleat, plait - any of various types of fold formed by doubling fabric back upon itself and then pressing or stitching into shape
4.tuck - a straight sword with a narrow blade and two edgestuck - a straight sword with a narrow blade and two edges
sword, steel, blade, brand - a cutting or thrusting weapon that has a long metal blade and a hilt with a hand guard
Verb1.tuck - fit snugly into; "insert your ticket into the slot"; "tuck your shirttail in"
inclose, shut in, close in, enclose - surround completely; "Darkness enclosed him"; "They closed in the porch with a fence"
2.tuck - make a tuck or several folds intuck - make a tuck or several folds in; "tuck the fabric"; "tuck in the sheet"
fold, fold up, turn up - bend or lay so that one part covers the other; "fold up the newspaper"; "turn up your collar"
3.tuck - draw together into folds or puckers
sew, sew together, stitch, run up - fasten by sewing; do needlework

tuck

verb
1. push, stick, stuff, slip, ease, insert, pop (informal) He tried to tuck his shirt inside his trousers.
2. pleat, gather, fold, ruffle Pin and tuck back pieces together with right sides facing.
3. (sometimes with away) hide, store, conceal, stash (informal), secrete, stow She folded the letter and tucked it behind a book.
noun
1. (Brit. informal) food, eats (slang), tack (informal), scoff (slang), grub (slang), kai (N.Z. informal), nosh (slang), victuals, comestibles, nosebag (slang), vittles (obsolete or dialect) The wags from the rival house were ready to snaffle his tuck.
2. fold, gather, pleat, pinch a tapered tuck used to take in fullness and control shape in a garment
tuck in (Informal) eat up, get stuck in (informal), eat heartily, fall to, chow down (slang) Tuck in, it's the last hot food you'll get for a while.
tuck into something devour (Informal) dig into (informal), get stuck into (informal), shift (Brit. informal), consume, hoover (informal), scoff (down) (informal), put away (informal), gobble up, polish off (informal), wolf down, get round the outside of (informal), get your laughing gear round (informal) She tucked into a breakfast of bacon and eggs.
tuck someone in make someone snug, wrap someone up, put someone to bed, bed someone down, swaddle I read her a story and tucked her in.
Translations
ثِنْيَه، طَيَّهحُلْوياتيَثْني
sladkostizáševekzastrčit
lægslik
begyûrbehajtásnyalánkság
brot, fellingsælgætiÿta, troîa; gyrîa
apkamšytisaldumynaisusikišti
ieloceiešuvesabāztsaldumi
sladkostizáševokzastrčiť
pokritizatlačiti

tuck

[tʌk]
A. N
1. (Sew) (= fold) → pinza f, pliegue m
to make or put a tuck in sthponer una pinza en algo
2. (Brit) (= food) → comida f; (= sweets) → dulces fpl, golosinas fpl
3. (plastic surgery) → reducción f mediante cirugía plástica
see also tummy
B. VT
1. (= put) → meter
2. (Sew) → plegar
C. CPD tuck shop N (Brit) (Scol) → tienda f de golosinas
tuck away VT + ADV
1. (= hide) → esconder, ocultar
tuck it away out of sightocúltalo para que no se vea
the village is tucked away among the woodsla aldea se esconde en el bosque
he tucked it away in his pocketse lo guardó en el bolsillo
she has her money safely tucked awaytiene su dinero bien guardado
2. (Brit) (= eat) → devorar, zampar
he can certainly tuck it awayése sí sabe comer
I can't think where he tucks it all awayno entiendo dónde lo almacena or lo echa
tuck in
A. VI + ADV (Brit) (= eat) → comer con apetito
tuck in!¡a comer!, ¡a ello!
B. VT + ADV
1. [+ shirt, blouse] → remeter, meter dentro
to tuck in a flapmeter una solapa para dentro
to tuck the bedclothes inremeter la ropa de la cama
2. [+ child] (in bed) → arropar
tuck into VI + PREP (Brit) [+ meal] → comer con buen apetito
tuck under VT + PREP to tuck one thing under anotherremeter una cosa debajo de otra
tuck up VT + ADV
1. (Sew) [+ skirt, sleeves] → remangar
2. (Brit) [+ child] (in bed) → arropar
you'll soon be nicely tucked uppronto estarás a gustito en la cama

tuck

[ˈtʌk]
n
(SEWING)pli m, rempli m
(= plastic surgery) → plastie f
a tummy tuck → une abdominoplastie
vt
(= put) → mettre
tuck away
vt
(= put away) [+ object] → ranger; [+ money] → mettre de côté
I tucked the box away in a drawer → J'ai rangé la boîte dans un tiroir.
She had a bit of money tucked away → Elle avait un peu d'argent mis de côté.
(= hide) → dissimuler
to be tucked away (in a quiet place) [house, shop, pub] → se cacher
tuck in
vt
[+ shirt, flap] → rentrer
to tuck sth inside sth → rentrer qch dans qch
He tucked his shirt inside his trousers → Il rentra sa chemise dans son pantalon.
to tuck the sheets in → border le lit
(in bed) [+ child] → border
vi (= start eating) → attaquer (= eat heartily) → manger de bon appétit
tuck in! → vous pouvez attaquer!
to tuck into sth → attaquer qch
tuck up
vt [+ child] → border

tuck

n
(Sew) → Saum m; (ornamental) → Biese f; to put a tuck in somethingeinen Saum in etw (acc)nähen
(Brit Sch inf: = food) → Süßigkeiten pl
vt
(= put)stecken; he tucked his umbrella under his armer steckte or klemmte (inf)sich (dat)den Regenschirm unter den Arm; the bird’s head was tucked under its wingder Vogel hatte den Kopf unter den Flügel gesteckt; he tucked his coat (a)round the shivering childer legte seinen Mantel fest um das frierende Kind; she sat with her feet tucked under hersie saß mit untergeschlagenen Beinen da
(Sew) → Biesen plsteppen in (+acc); a tucked bodiceein Oberteil mit Biesen
vi your bag will tuck under the seatdu kannst deine Tasche unter dem Sitz verstauen

tuck

[tʌk]
1. n (Sewing) → pince f inv, piega
2. vt (put) → infilare, mettere, cacciare
she tucked a blanket round him → lo ha avvolto in una coperta
3. vi to tuck into a meal (Brit) (fam) → lanciarsi sul pasto
tuck away vt + adv (put away) → riporre in un luogo sicuro; (hide) → nascondere
she has her money safely tucked away → ha messo i soldi in un posto sicuro
tuck in
1. vi + adv (Brit) (fam) (eat) → mangiare con grande appetito, abbuffarsi
2. vt + adv (blankets) → rimboccare; (shirt) → mettere dentro
to tuck sb in → rimboccare le coperte a qn
tuck up vt + adv (skirt, sleeves) → tirare su
to tuck sb up → rimboccare le coperte a qn

tuck

(tak) noun
1. a fold sewn into a piece of material. Her dress had tucks in the sleeves.
2. sweets, cakes etc. Schoolboys used to spend their money on tuck; (also adjective) a tuck shop.
verb
to push, stuff etc. He tucked his shirt into his trousers.
tuck in
1. to gather bedclothes etc closely round. I said goodnight and tucked him in.
2. to eat greedily or with enjoyment. They sat down to breakfast and started to tuck in straight away.
References in classic literature ?
And then Tamoszius' face would light up and he would get out his fiddle, tuck it under his chin, and play.
I judged that a sharp, bright new nickel, with a first-rate like- ness of the king on one side of it and Guenever on the other, and a blooming pious motto, would take the tuck out of scrofula as handy as a nobler coin and please the scrofulous fancy more; and I was right.
Would any one suppose I could so snugly tuck away such a mass in a chapter of this book that it would be difficult to find it again in the reader lost his place?
When you got to the table you couldn't go right to eating, but you had to wait for the widow to tuck down her head and grumble a little over the victuals, though there warn't really anything the matter with them, -- that is, nothing only everything was cooked by itself.
De queen she lef' her baby layin' aroun' one day, en went out callin'; an one 'o de niggers roun'bout de place dat was 'mos' white, she come in en see de chile layin' aroun', en tuck en put her own chile's clo's on de queen's chile, en put de queen's chile's clo'es on her own chile, en den lef' her own chile layin' aroun', en tuck en toted de queen's chile home to de nigger quarter, en nobody ever foun' it out, en her chile was de king bimeby, en sole de queen's chile down de river one time when dey had to settle up de estate.
Well, say, Joe, you can be Friar Tuck or Much the miller's son, and lam me with a quarter-staff; or I'll be the Sheriff of Nottingham and you be Robin Hood a little while and kill me.
Long did the hours seem while I waited the departure of the company, and listened for the sound of Bessie's step on the stairs: sometimes she would come up in the interval to seek her thimble or her scissors, or perhaps to bring me something by way of supper--a bun or a cheese-cake--then she would sit on the bed while I ate it, and when I had finished, she would tuck the clothes round me, and twice she kissed me, and said, "Good night, Miss Jane.
A boy may lock his door, may be warm in bed, may tuck himself up, may draw the clothes over his head, may think himself comfortable and safe, but that young man will softly creep and creep his way to him and tear him open.
I mean the meeting of the King with Friar Tuck at the cell of that buxom hermit.
Tuck up your gown and go through them without touching anything, or you will die instantly.
I am but a poor anchorite, a curtall friar," said the other, whistling to his pack, "by name Friar Tuck of Fountain's Dale.
Him also it loved because on occasions of stress he was used to tuck up his cassock and charge with the rest into the merriest of the fray, where he always found, good man, that the saints sent him a revolver when there was a fallen private to be protected, or - but this came as an afterthought his own gray head to be guarded.