tucker


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tuck·er 1

 (tŭk′ər)
n.
1. One that tucks, especially an attachment on a sewing machine for making tucks.
2. A piece of linen or frill of lace formerly worn by women around the neck and shoulders.
3. Chiefly Australian Food.

tuck·er 2

 (tŭk′ər)
tr.v. tuck·ered, tuck·er·ing, tuck·ers Informal
To make weary; exhaust. Usually used with out.

[Perhaps from tuck.]

tucker

(ˈtʌkə)
n
1. a person or thing that tucks
2. (Clothing & Fashion) a detachable yoke of lace, linen, etc, often white, worn over the breast, as of a low-cut dress
3. (Knitting & Sewing) an attachment on a sewing machine used for making tucks at regular intervals
4. (Cookery) old-fashioned Austral and NZ an informal word for food

tucker

(ˈtʌkə)
vb
informal chiefly (usually foll by: out) US and Canadian to weary or tire completely

tuck•er1

(ˈtʌk ər)

n.
1. a person or thing that tucks.
2. a piece of fine fabric, as linen or lace, formerly worn by women around the neck and shoulders.
3. Australian. food.
[1225–75]

tuck•er2

(ˈtʌk ər)

v.t. Informal.
to tire; exhaust (often fol. by out).
[1825–35, Amer.; appar. derivative of tuck1; compare dial. tucked-up (of a horse or dog) shrunken from hunger, emaciated]

Tuck•er

(ˈtʌk ər)

n.
Richard, 1915–75, U.S. operatic tenor.

tucker


Past participle: tuckered
Gerund: tuckering

Imperative
tucker
tucker
Present
I tucker
you tucker
he/she/it tuckers
we tucker
you tucker
they tucker
Preterite
I tuckered
you tuckered
he/she/it tuckered
we tuckered
you tuckered
they tuckered
Present Continuous
I am tuckering
you are tuckering
he/she/it is tuckering
we are tuckering
you are tuckering
they are tuckering
Present Perfect
I have tuckered
you have tuckered
he/she/it has tuckered
we have tuckered
you have tuckered
they have tuckered
Past Continuous
I was tuckering
you were tuckering
he/she/it was tuckering
we were tuckering
you were tuckering
they were tuckering
Past Perfect
I had tuckered
you had tuckered
he/she/it had tuckered
we had tuckered
you had tuckered
they had tuckered
Future
I will tucker
you will tucker
he/she/it will tucker
we will tucker
you will tucker
they will tucker
Future Perfect
I will have tuckered
you will have tuckered
he/she/it will have tuckered
we will have tuckered
you will have tuckered
they will have tuckered
Future Continuous
I will be tuckering
you will be tuckering
he/she/it will be tuckering
we will be tuckering
you will be tuckering
they will be tuckering
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been tuckering
you have been tuckering
he/she/it has been tuckering
we have been tuckering
you have been tuckering
they have been tuckering
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been tuckering
you will have been tuckering
he/she/it will have been tuckering
we will have been tuckering
you will have been tuckering
they will have been tuckering
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been tuckering
you had been tuckering
he/she/it had been tuckering
we had been tuckering
you had been tuckering
they had been tuckering
Conditional
I would tucker
you would tucker
he/she/it would tucker
we would tucker
you would tucker
they would tucker
Past Conditional
I would have tuckered
you would have tuckered
he/she/it would have tuckered
we would have tuckered
you would have tuckered
they would have tuckered
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Tucker - United States anarchist influential before World War I (1854-1939)
2.tucker - United States vaudevillian (born in Russia) noted for her flamboyant performances (1884-1966)Tucker - United States vaudevillian (born in Russia) noted for her flamboyant performances (1884-1966)
3.tucker - a sewer who tuckstucker - a sewer who tucks      
sewer - someone who sews; "a sewer of fine gowns"
4.tucker - a detachable yoke of linen or lace worn over the breast of a low-cut dresstucker - a detachable yoke of linen or lace worn over the breast of a low-cut dress
yoke - fabric comprising a fitted part at the top of a garment
Verb1.tucker - wear out completelytucker - wear out completely; "This kind of work exhausts me"; "I'm beat"; "He was all washed up after the exam"
fag out, wear down, wear out, wear upon, weary, tire out, fatigue, jade, outwear, tire, fag, wear - exhaust or get tired through overuse or great strain or stress; "We wore ourselves out on this hike"
frazzle - exhaust physically or emotionally; "She was frazzled after the visit of her in-laws"
play - exhaust by allowing to pull on the line; "play a hooked fish"
kill - tire out completely; "The daily stress of her work is killing her"

tucker

verb
Informal. To make extremely tired.Also used with out:
Informal: knock out.
Slang: do in, poop (out).
Idioms: run ragged, take it out of.
Translations

tucker

[ˈtʌkəʳ] VT (US) to be tuckered (out)estar molido or rendido

tucker

[ˈtʌkər] n (mainly Australian) (= food) → bouffe f tuckered out [ˌtʌkərdˈaʊt] adj (mainly US)crevé(e) tuck shop tuck-shop n (British) petite boutique où les écoliers peuvent acheter des pâtisseries, des bonbons etc

tucker

1
vt (US inf) → fertigmachen (inf)

tucker

2
n (esp Austral) → Proviant m

tucker

3
n (old: Fashion) → Schultertuch nt ? bib
References in classic literature ?
Tucker was the middle-aged curate, one of the "inferior clergy," who are usually not wanting in sons.
Tucker was invaluable in their walk; and perhaps Mr.
Maggie, too, would have admired Lucy's houses, and would have given up her own unsuccessful building to contemplate them, without ill temper, if her tucker had not made her peevish, and if Tom had not inconsiderately laughed when her houses fell, and told her she was "a stupid.
Tulliver had on her visiting costume, with a protective apparatus of brown holland, as if she had been a piece of satin furniture in danger of flies; Maggie was frowning and twisting her shoulders, that she might if possible shrink away from the prickliest of tuckers, while her mother was remonstrating, "Don't, Maggie, my dear; don't make yourself so ugly
With these words, after many pretty little coquettish doubts and fears, and wishes that she might not have lost it, Mary produced the letter from behind the nicest little muslin tucker possible, and handed it to Sam, who thereupon kissed it with much gallantry and devotion.
thrilled out above the silent house (the boxes always stopped talking during the Daisy Song) a warm pink mounted to the girl's cheek, mantled her brow to the roots of her fair braids, and suffused the young slope of her breast to the line where it met a modest tulle tucker fastened with a single gardenia.
Poor 'Narcissa' after death (says Walpole) was attired in a Holland nightdress, with tucker and double ruffles of Brunswick lace, of which latter material she also wore a headdress, and a pair of new kid gloves.
There was no tucker in the draf' whin ut fell in for the march, an' divil a wurrd about 'illegality' cud I hear.
The captain, emboldened by her gentleness, clasped her waist without resistance; then began softly to unlace the poor child's corsage, and disarranged her tucker to such an extent that the panting priest beheld the gypsy's beautiful shoulder emerge from the gauze, as round and brown as the moon rising through the mists of the horizon.
There's ten thousand sharks following us for the tucker we've ben throwin' over to them.
The way he went after that plump sister in the lace tucker, was an outrage on the credulity of human nature.
And, ma'am," he continued, "the laundress tells me some of the girls have two clean tuckers in the week: it is too much; the rules limit them to one.