tuffet


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tuf·fet

 (tŭf′ĭt)
n.
1. A clump or tuft of grass.
2. A low seat, such as a stool.

[Alteration of tuft.]

tuffet

(ˈtʌfɪt)
n
(Furniture) a small mound or low seat
[C16: alteration of tuft]

tuf•fet

(ˈtʌf ɪt)
n.
1. a low stool; footstool.
2. Dial. tuft.
[1550–55]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tuffet - a low seat or a stool to rest the feet of a seated persontuffet - a low seat or a stool to rest the feet of a seated person
stool - a simple seat without a back or arms
Translations
fűcsomópuff

tuffet

n (old)kleiner Hügel, Buckel m
References in periodicals archive ?
030515DMISSTUFFET_01 | Making Miss Tuffet workshop at |Stirley Hill community farm, from left, Henry King (8), Harry King (2) Monica Plested and Caroline Fishpool.
A one-T buffet, food served hot, A two-T Buffett, worth a lot, But I'll bet you Miss Muffet's tuffet you never saw a three-T buffettt.
Whey Protein--Little Miss Muffet, sitting on her tuffet (a low seat--I looked it up) while eating her curds and whey did a wise thing.
all, it turns out, are international (american, australian and Jamaican respectively) variations on the rhyme about little Miss Muffet sitting on her tuffet and eating her curds and whey - which might not make a whole lot more sense but at least sounds familiar to an english adult ear.
CALL IT AN OTTOMAN, POUF, HASSOCK, FOOTSTOOL or even tuffet, the concept is the same--an upholstered, backless, usually round piece of occasional furniture that you can use for extra seating, a cocktail table or to rest your feet on.
Its whorls of large bells in rusty oranges and vivid reds and yellows encircle stout yard–high stems, finished off with a tuffet of leaves reminiscent of a pineapple.
Its whorls of large bells in rusty oranges and vivid reds and yellows encircle stout yard-high stems which are finished off with a tuffet of leaves reminiscent of a pineapple.
Imagine Helena Bonham-Carter eating strawberries and cream on a sun-dappled tuffet while listening to Test Match Special and you're halfway to knowing just how gloriously English Glorious Goodwood can be.
Spider is trying to prove that she did not intentionally fall onto Miss Muffet's tuffet.
We all know that "Little Miss Muffet sat on her tuffet, eating her curds and whey" but the kids don't know that to make cheese, milk has to be separated into curds which are the lumpy bits and whey which is the liquid bit.