tughra


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tughra

(ˈtuːɡrə)
n
the official emblem of a Turkish Sultan
References in periodicals archive ?
Adeeb used the graceful and exclusive Tughra style for Ahmad Shawqi's poem eulogising the birth of the Prophet (PBUH).
Tenders are invited for Tughra Road Pmgsy To Mothwari Lachhandih
Fethullah Gulen, Emerald Hills of Heart, Key Concepts in the Practice of Sufism (Clifton, NJ: Tughra Books, 2004).
About the Publisher: Tughra Books is a US-based publisher of Islamic books, Islamic history and art, spirituality and traditions.
She worked with the US-based publisher Tughra Publishing and their branch offices in Istanbul to compose the designs.
Missing from the lineup of topics is the application of tiles in mosaic and wall decor, and the tughra in jewelry and personalized items, both valuable evidences of artisanal individuation.
It was much earlier in my career that I realized that people seldom read text, so just to shock them I wrote words/ messages they least expected in a formal tughra format, sometimes I even got away with it.
Other designs began to emerge on the tiles and other artefacts, mainly consisting of spiral scrolls derived from the stylized TUGHRA (imperial cipher) of Suleiman the Magnificent (c.
Nor can there be many more gloriously complex than the decoration within the tughra, the ruler's signature, on the Ferman (imperial Decree) of the Turkish Sultan, Suleyman the Magnificent, dated 1559 (Fig.
As soon as a new ruler was enthroned, a tughra was created for him, combining his name with those of his father and grandfather in an elegant, cleverly compressed manner.
Many official documents, as well as the Ottoman coinage, were elaborately decorated with the imperial tughra (signature) of the sultan, making each a work of art.
He inverts the rules of writing in the Nastaliq or tughra script, by infusing new meaning to the role of the khattat; he writes English words in Arabic script.