tulip


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

tu·lip

 (to͞o′lĭp, tyo͞o′-)
n.
1. Any of several bulbous plants of the genus Tulipa of the lily family, native chiefly to Asia and widely cultivated for their showy, variously colored, cup-shaped flowers.
2. The flower of any of these plants.

[French tulipe, alteration of tulipan, from Ottoman Turkish tülbend, piece of muslin used as a headscarf or head covering, from earlier dülbend; see turban.]
Word History: The word tulip, like the cultivated tulip plant itself, has its origins in the Middle East. The tulip figures frequently in Persian verse, where its red color evokes the blood of martyrs and the fire of love, and in Turkey, tulips are associated with the delicate refinement and luxury that characterized the Ottoman Empire at the height of its power. Western European visitors to the Ottoman Empire in the 1500s were astonished by the beautiful expanses of tulips cultivated by the sultans. Tulips were brought to western Europe from the Ottoman Empire sometime in the same century, and the English word tulip ultimately stems from Ottoman Turkish tülbend (modern Turkish tülbent), the word for a piece of muslin used as a headscarf or head covering. The Turkish word for a turban seems to have been used for the flower in western European languages because a fully opened tulip was thought to resemble a turban, the typical headwear of men in the land where tulips originated. (The actual Turkish word for a tulip is lale, from Persian lâle.) Turkish tülbend, used as a name for the tulip, was borrowed into many languages of western Europe as the popularity of the tulip spread, and by the late 1500s it had reached English, in which it was at first variously spelled tulipa, tulipant, and tulip. The English word turban, also first recorded in English in the 1500s, can be traced to Ottoman Turkish tülbend, too.

tulip

(ˈtjuːlɪp)
n
1. (Plants) any spring-blooming liliaceous plant of the temperate Eurasian genus Tulipa, having tapering bulbs, long broad pointed leaves, and single showy bell-shaped flowers
2. (Plants) the flower or bulb of any of these plants
[C17: from New Latin tulipa, from Turkish tülbend turban, which the opened bloom was thought to resemble]
ˈtulip-ˌlike adj

tu•lip

(ˈtu lɪp, ˈtyu-)

n.
1. any of various plants belonging to the genus Tulipa, of the lily family, having lance-shaped leaves and large, showy, cup-shaped or bell-shaped flowers in a variety of colors.
2. a flower or bulb of such a plant.
[1570–80; earlier tulipa < New Latin, appar. back formation from Italian tulipano (taken as adj.) < Turkish tülbent turban (from a fancied likeness); see turban]
tu′lip•like`, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tulip - any of numerous perennial bulbous herbs having linear or broadly lanceolate leaves and usually a single showy flowertulip - any of numerous perennial bulbous herbs having linear or broadly lanceolate leaves and usually a single showy flower
liliaceous plant - plant growing from a bulb or corm or rhizome or tuber
genus Tulipa, Tulipa - Eurasian perennial bulbous herbs
dwarf tulip, Tulipa armena, Tulipa suaveolens - small early blooming tulip
candlestick tulip, lady tulip, Tulipa clusiana - Eurasian tulip with small flowers blotched at the base
Tulipa gesneriana - tall late blooming tulip
cottage tulip - any of several long-stemmed tulips that flower in May; have egg-shaped variously colored flowers
Darwin tulip - any of several very tall, late blooming tulips bearing large squarish flowers on sturdy stems
Translations
تُولِيبخُزامى، زَنْبَق
tulipán
tulipan
لاله
tulppaani
tulipanlala
tulipán
tulip
túlípani
チューリップ
튤립
tulpė
tulpe
tulipán
tulipan
lalatulipanлалатулипан
tulpan
ดอกทิวลิป
lalelâle
cây uất kim hương

tulip

[ˈtjuːlɪp]
A. Ntulipán m
B. CPD tulip tree Ntulipanero m, tulipero m

tulip

[ˈtjuːlɪp]
ntulipe f
modif [bulb] → de tulipe; [fields] → de tulipes tulip treetulip tree ntulipier m

tulip

nTulpe f; tulip treeTulpenbaum m

tulip

[ˈtjuːlɪp] ntulipano

tulip

(ˈtjuːlip) noun
a kind of plant with brightly-coloured cup-shaped flowers, grown from a bulb.

tulip

تُولِيب tulipán tulipan Tulpe τουλίπα tulipán tulppaani tulipe tulipan tulipano チューリップ 튤립 tulp tulipan tulipan tulipa тюльпан tulpan ดอกทิวลิป lale cây uất kim hương 郁金香
References in classic literature ?
It was rather like a mosaic palace, rent with earthquakes; or like a Dutch tulip garden blown to the stars with dynamite.
Five more sickened from this cause, but we managed to cure them with doses of an infusion made by boiling down the tulip leaves.
Another was lolling on a garden-chair, reading a postage-stamp which some human had let fall, and when he heard Peter's voice he popped in alarm behind a tulip.
as we are assured by the "Floriste Francaise," the most highly considered authority in matters relating to this flower) is the first word in the Cingalese tongue which was ever used to designate that masterpiece of floriculture which is now called the tulip.
He was walking in his garden as we went by, looking at his tulip beds.
She is always right,' rejoined Mr Mantalini soothingly, 'and when she says it is time to go, it is time, and go she shall; and when she walks along the streets with her own tulip, the women shall say, with envy, she has got a demd fine husband; and the men shall say with rapture, he has got a demd fine wife; and they shall both be right and neither wrong, upon my life and soul--oh demmit
Its garden, too, glowed with flowers: hollyhocks had sprung up tall as trees, lilies had opened, tulips and roses were in bloom; the borders of the little beds were gay with pink thrift and crimson double daisies; the sweetbriars gave out, morning and evening, their scent of spice and apples; and these fragrant treasures were all useless for most of the inmates of Lowood, except to furnish now and then a handful of herbs and blossoms to put in a coffin.
Where any of these wanted fortunes, I would provide them with convenient lodges round my own estate, and have some of them always at my table; only mingling a few of the most valuable among you mortals, whom length of time would harden me to lose with little or no reluctance, and treat your posterity after the same manner; just as a man diverts himself with the annual succession of pinks and tulips in his garden, without regretting the loss of those which withered the preceding year.
The roof was all of crimson roses, the windows of lilies, the walls of white carnations, the floors of glowing auriculas and violets, the doors of gorgeous tulips and narcissi with sunflowers for knockers, and all round hyacinths and other sweet-smelling flowers bloomed in masses, so that the air was perfumed far and near and enchanted all who were present.
There seemed a deep sense of life and joy about all; and although no airs blew from out the heavens, yet every thing had motion through the gentle sweepings to and fro of innumerable butterflies, that might have been mistaken for tulips with wings.
Ah, old screen, what a gorgeous personage you must have been in your young days, when the tulips and roses and lilies (all growing from one stem) were fresh in their glistening sheen
It was May, and my heart bled at the thought of the tulips I had put in in November, and that I had never seen since.