tumult


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tu·mult

 (to͞o′mŭlt′, tyo͞o′-)
n.
1. A great noise, as of a crowd: had to shout over the tumult in the cafeteria.
2. A disorderly commotion or disturbance: "shops at this hour ... the scene of mercantile tumult" (Nicholas Clapp).
3. A state of agitation of the mind or emotions: "I spend much time in a tumult of anger and disbelief" (Scott Turow).

[Middle English tumulte, from Latin tumultus.]

tumult

(ˈtjuːmʌlt)
n
1. a loud confused noise, as of a crowd; commotion
2. violent agitation or disturbance
3. great emotional or mental agitation
[C15: from Latin tumultus, from tumēre to swell up]

tu•mult

(ˈtu mʌlt, -məlt, ˈtyu-)

n.
1. violent and noisy commotion or disturbance of a crowd or mob; uproar.
2. a general outbreak, riot, uprising, or other disorder.
3. highly distressing agitation of mind or feeling; turbulent mental or emotional disturbance.
[1375–1425; late Middle English tumult(e) < Latin tumultus an uproar, akin to tumēre to swell]

Tumult

 a disorderly mob; a violent commotion.
Examples: tumult of grief and indignation, 1844; of joys, 1777; of passions, 1711; of spirits.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tumult - a state of commotion and noise and confusiontumult - a state of commotion and noise and confusion
commotion, hoo-ha, hoo-hah, hurly burly, kerfuffle, to-do, disruption, disturbance, flutter - a disorderly outburst or tumult; "they were amazed by the furious disturbance they had caused"
combustion - a state of violent disturbance and excitement; "combustion grew until revolt was unavoidable"
2.tumult - violent agitationtumult - violent agitation      
agitation - the feeling of being agitated; not calm
3.tumult - the act of making a noisy disturbancetumult - the act of making a noisy disturbance
disturbance - the act of disturbing something or someone; setting something in motion
ado, bustle, flurry, hustle, stir, fuss - a rapid active commotion

tumult

noun
2. clamour, row, outbreak, racket, din, uproar, fracas, commotion, pandemonium, babel, hubbub, hullabaloo Round one ended to a tumult of whistles, screams and shouts.
clamour peace, quiet, silence, calm, hush, serenity, stillness, repose

tumult

noun
1. Sounds or a sound, especially when loud, confused, or disagreeable:
2. A quarrel, fight, or disturbance marked by very noisy, disorderly, and often violent behavior:
Informal: fracas.
Slang: rumble.
3. An interruption of regular procedure or of public peace:
Informal: flap, to-do.
4. A state of discomposure:
Informal: lather, stew.
Translations
ضَجَّه
rámusruch
tumult
hávaîi, læti
kņadatroksnis

tumult

[ˈtjuːmʌlt] N (= uproar) → tumulto m
to be in a tumult [person] → estar agitado or alborotado
her emotions were in a tumulttenía un conflicto emocional

tumult

[ˈtjuːmʌlt] ntumulte m

tumult

n
(= uproar)Tumult m; the tumult of battledas Schlachtgetümmel
(emotional) his mind was in a tumultsein Inneres befand sich in Aufruhr; a tumult of emotion/weepingein Gefühls-/Tränenausbruch m

tumult

[ˈtjuːmʌlt] ntumulto

tumult

(ˈtjuːmalt) noun
a great noise (usually made by a crowd). He could hear a great tumult in the street.
tuˈmultuous (-tʃuəs) adjective
with great noise or confusion. The crowd gave him a tumultuous welcome; tumultuous applause.
tuˈmultuously adverb
References in classic literature ?
While the words were still on the lips of Heyward, there had arisen such a tumult of yells and cries as served to drive the swift currents of his own blood back from its bounding course into the fountains of his heart.
It was the belief of those who knew him best, that he would positively have taken the very singular step of giving up the House of the Seven Gables to the representative of Matthew Maule, but for the unspeakable tumult which a suspicion of the old gentleman's project awakened among his Pyncheon relatives.
The evolutions of the parade; the tumult of the battle; the flourish of old heroic music, heard thirty years before -- such scenes and sounds, perhaps, were all alive before his intellectual sense.
But now when the boatswain calls all hands to lighten her; when boxes, bales, and jars are clattering overboard; when the wind is shrieking, and the men are yelling, and every plank thunders with trampling feet right over Jonah's head; in all this raging tumult, Jonah sleeps his hideous sleep.
You know I've been lying all day with the sick-headache; and there's been such a tumult made ever since you came, I'm half dead.
At first the tumult of my own thoughts, summoned by the danger-signal and swarming to the rescue from every quarter of my skull, kept up such a hurrah and confusion and fifing and drumming that I couldn't take in a word; but presently when my mob of gathering plans began to crystallize and fall into position and form line of battle, a sort of order and quiet ensued and I caught the boom of the king's batteries, as if out of remote distance:
Scarcely had these tones sounded, everywhere there began tumult and sound, as if voices above and below the water.
How all my brain was in tumult, and all my heart in insurrection
Wuthering' being a significant provincial adjective, descriptive of the atmospheric tumult to which its station is exposed in stormy weather.
In the thoroughfares where shops abound, the sordid struggle with poverty shows itself unreservedly on the filthy pavement; gathers its forces through the week; and, strengthening to a tumult on Saturday night, sees the Sunday morning dawn in murky gaslight.
Everywhere was tumult, exultation, deafening and maniacal bewilderment, astounding noise, yet furious dumb-show.
Although they had but that moment left the school behind them, they were now in the busy thoroughfares of a city, where shadowy passengers passed and repassed; where shadowy carts and coaches battle for the way, and all the strife and tumult of a real city were.