tumult

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tu·mult

 (to͞o′mŭlt′, tyo͞o′-)
n.
1. A great noise, as of a crowd: had to shout over the tumult in the cafeteria.
2. A disorderly commotion or disturbance: "shops at this hour ... the scene of mercantile tumult" (Nicholas Clapp).
3. A state of agitation of the mind or emotions: "I spend much time in a tumult of anger and disbelief" (Scott Turow).

[Middle English tumulte, from Latin tumultus.]

tumult

(ˈtjuːmʌlt)
n
1. a loud confused noise, as of a crowd; commotion
2. violent agitation or disturbance
3. great emotional or mental agitation
[C15: from Latin tumultus, from tumēre to swell up]

tu•mult

(ˈtu mʌlt, -məlt, ˈtyu-)

n.
1. violent and noisy commotion or disturbance of a crowd or mob; uproar.
2. a general outbreak, riot, uprising, or other disorder.
3. highly distressing agitation of mind or feeling; turbulent mental or emotional disturbance.
[1375–1425; late Middle English tumult(e) < Latin tumultus an uproar, akin to tumēre to swell]

Tumult

 a disorderly mob; a violent commotion.
Examples: tumult of grief and indignation, 1844; of joys, 1777; of passions, 1711; of spirits.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tumult - a state of commotion and noise and confusiontumult - a state of commotion and noise and confusion
commotion, hoo-ha, hoo-hah, hurly burly, kerfuffle, to-do, disruption, disturbance, flutter - a disorderly outburst or tumult; "they were amazed by the furious disturbance they had caused"
combustion - a state of violent disturbance and excitement; "combustion grew until revolt was unavoidable"
2.tumult - violent agitationtumult - violent agitation      
agitation - the feeling of being agitated; not calm
3.tumult - the act of making a noisy disturbancetumult - the act of making a noisy disturbance
disturbance - the act of disturbing something or someone; setting something in motion
ado, bustle, flurry, hustle, stir, fuss - a rapid active commotion

tumult

noun
2. clamour, row, outbreak, racket, din, uproar, fracas, commotion, pandemonium, babel, hubbub, hullabaloo Round one ended to a tumult of whistles, screams and shouts.
clamour peace, quiet, silence, calm, hush, serenity, stillness, repose

tumult

noun
1. Sounds or a sound, especially when loud, confused, or disagreeable:
2. A quarrel, fight, or disturbance marked by very noisy, disorderly, and often violent behavior:
Informal: fracas.
Slang: rumble.
3. An interruption of regular procedure or of public peace:
Informal: flap, to-do.
4. A state of discomposure:
Informal: lather, stew.
Translations
ضَجَّه
rámusruch
tumult
hávaîi, læti
kņadatroksnis

tumult

[ˈtjuːmʌlt] N (= uproar) → tumulto m
to be in a tumult [person] → estar agitado or alborotado
her emotions were in a tumulttenía un conflicto emocional

tumult

[ˈtjuːmʌlt] ntumulte m

tumult

n
(= uproar)Tumult m; the tumult of battledas Schlachtgetümmel
(emotional) his mind was in a tumultsein Inneres befand sich in Aufruhr; a tumult of emotion/weepingein Gefühls-/Tränenausbruch m

tumult

[ˈtjuːmʌlt] ntumulto

tumult

(ˈtjuːmalt) noun
a great noise (usually made by a crowd). He could hear a great tumult in the street.
tuˈmultuous (-tʃuəs) adjective
with great noise or confusion. The crowd gave him a tumultuous welcome; tumultuous applause.
tuˈmultuously adverb
References in classic literature ?
And still in the distracted distance we beheld the tumults of the outer concentric circles, and saw successive pods of whales, eight or ten in each, swiftly going round and round, like multiplied spans of horses in a ring; and so closely shoulder to shoulder, that a Titanic circus-rider might easily have over-arched the middle ones, and so have gone round on their backs.
Mightie Father, thou thy foes Justly hast in derision, and secure Laugh'st at thir vain designes and tumults vain, Matter to mee of Glory, whom thir hate Illustrates, when they see all Regal Power Giv'n me to quell thir pride, and in event Know whether I be dextrous to subdue Thy Rebels, or be found the worst in Heav'n.
It is from these specimens of the refuse of our Nobility that the great Tumults and Seditions of past ages have generally derived their leaders; and so great is the mischief thence arising that an increasing minority of our more progressive Statesmen are of opinion that true mercy would dictate their entire suppression, by enacting that all who fail to pass the Final Examination of the University should be either imprisoned for life, or extinguished by a painless death.
And if his successors had been united they would have enjoyed it securely and at their ease, for there were no tumults raised in the kingdom except those they provoked themselves.
All that he had heard from these three different men, Comminges, Guitant and Villequier, confirmed him in his conviction that in case of serious tumults there would be no one on his side except the queen; and then Anne of Austria had so often deserted her friends that her support seemed most precarious.
Heir to these tumults, this affright, that fraye(By Adam's, fathers', own, sin bound alway); Peer up, draw out thy horoscope and say Which planet mends thy threadbare fate or mars?
Outwardly he had been no ardent or enterprising lover; the career of his passion had confined its tumults and vicissitudes so entirely within the artist's imagination that Annie herself had scarcely more than a woman's intuitive perception of it; but, in Owen's view, it covered the whole field of his life.
Howsoever he noteth it right, that seditious tumults, and seditious fames, differ no more but as brother and sister, masculine and feminine; especially if it come to that, that the best actions of a state, and the most plausible, and which ought to give greatest contentment, are taken in ill sense, and traduced: for that shows the envy great, as Tacitus saith; conflata magna invidia, seu bene seu male gesta premunt.
Something fell past him out of the vast darknesses above and vanished into the tumults below, going obliquely downward.
924-929) But Zeus himself gave birth from his own head to bright-eyed Tritogeneia (29), the awful, the strife-stirring, the host-leader, the unwearying, the queen, who delights in tumults and wars and battles.
Who does not sometimes envy the good and brave who are no more to suffer from the tumults of the natural world, and await with curious complacency the speedy term of his own conversation with finite nature.
The clock had now struck five when Jones awaked from a nap of seven hours, so much refreshed, and in such perfect health and spirits, that he resolved to get up and dress himself; for which purpose he unlocked his portmanteau, and took out clean linen, and a suit of cloaths; but first he slipt on a frock, and went down into the kitchen to bespeak something that might pacify certain tumults he found rising within his stomach.