tumulus


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Related to tumulus: burial mound

tu·mu·lus

 (to͞o′myə-ləs, tyo͞o′-)
n. pl. tu·mu·li (-lī′)
An ancient grave mound; a barrow.

[Latin; see teuə- in Indo-European roots.]

tumulus

(ˈtjuːmjʊləs)
n, pl -li (-liː)
(Archaeology) archaeol (no longer in technical usage) another word for barrow2
[C17: from Latin: a hillock, from tumēre to swell up]

tu•mu•lus

(ˈtu myə ləs, ˈtyu-)

n., pl. -lus•es, -li (-ˌlaɪ)
an artificial mound, esp. over a grave; barrow.
[1680–90; < Latin: mound, swelling =tum(ēre) to swell + -ulus -ule]
tu′mu•lar, tu′mu•lous, tu′mu•lose` (-ˌloʊs) adj.

tumulus

, barrow - A tumulus is the mound of earth placed over a tomb, synonymous with barrow.
See also related terms for mound.

tumulus

An ancient grave mound or barrow.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tumulus - (archeology) a heap of earth placed over prehistoric tombstumulus - (archeology) a heap of earth placed over prehistoric tombs
hill, mound - structure consisting of an artificial heap or bank usually of earth or stones; "they built small mounds to hide behind"
archaeology, archeology - the branch of anthropology that studies prehistoric people and their cultures
Translations

tumulus

[ˈtjuːmjʊləs] N (tumuli (pl)) [ˈtjuːmjʊlaɪ]túmulo m

tumulus

nTumulus m, → Grabhügel m
References in classic literature ?
In the centre was a hillock or tumulus, surmounted by a scorched hawthorn.
The Celtic dolmen and cromlech, the Etruscan tumulus, the Hebrew galgal, are words.
The shadow of the Saxon hero-king still walks there fitfully, reviewing the scenes of his youth and love-time, and is met by the gloomier shadow of the dreadful heathen Dane, who was stabbed in the midst of his warriors by the sword of an invisible avenger, and who rises on autumn evenings like a white mist from his tumulus on the hill, and hovers in the court of the old hall by the river-side, the spot where he was thus miraculously slain in the days before the old hall was built.
Archeologists have been carrying out excavations in Karum hamlet near Kultepe tumulus, where Assyrians used to live, since 1948.
The same name is shared by a tumulus near Bwlch-y-Ddeufanin Gwynedd and a natural outcrop of rock near the waterfall at Llanrhaeadr in Powys.
It consisted of a 53m-long Neolithic barrow, which had developed from a group of eight non-megalithic graves, and four additional earth-covered megalithic dolmen chambers which had between them gradually elongated the tumulus (Figure 2).
The town, known for its vineyards for centuries, is also home to the tumulus of the Trojan hero Hector.
Finally, a new feature of the Gordion Museum will offer its visitors a 3D tour of the Gordion tumulus of King Midas, which is normally closed to visitors.
Here, however, the ramp is barely visible due to the construction of a large tumulus tomb at the apex of the kite's arms (Figures 9 & 10).
Scientists found 4,000-year-old three lentil seeds in Seyitomer Tumulus in the western province of Kutahya.
A dig kicked off at the Hacylar tumulus in the southern province of Burdur, led by Professor GE-lsE-m Umurtak from ystanbul University's archeology department.
It was he, for instance, who encouraged us to see the 'hache-charrue' design on some standing stones as a representation of a sperm whale; who pioneered innovative techniques of recording and mapping monuments; who discovered stone alignments that had been drowned by the rising sea; who investigated the long-distance contacts of the builders of the gigantic tumulus carnaceens; and who worked with Jean L'Helgouach on the astonishing complex of monuments at Locmariaquer (the definitive publication on which fieldwork is shortly to be published).