tunic


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tu·nic

 (to͞o′nĭk, tyo͞o′-)
n.
1.
a. A loose-fitting garment, sleeved or sleeveless, extending to the knees and worn especially in ancient Greece and Rome.
b. A medieval surcoat.
2. A long, plain, close-fitting jacket, usually having a stiff high collar and worn as part of a uniform.
3. A loose-fitting, pullover, collarless shirt that falls to the hip or thigh and is often drawn in at the waist and worn over leggings or pants.
4. Anatomy A coat or layer enveloping an organ or part.
5. Botany A loose membranous outer covering of a bulb or corm, as of an onion, tulip, or crocus.
6. See tunicle.

[Middle English tunik, from Old French tunique, from Latin tunica, of Phoenician origin; akin to Hebrew kuttōnet, kətōnet, from Central Semitic *kuttān, *kittān; see chiton.]

tunic

(ˈtjuːnɪk)
n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) any of various hip-length or knee-length garments, such as the loose sleeveless garb worn in ancient Greece or Rome, the jacket of some soldiers, or a woman's hip-length garment, worn with a skirt or trousers
2. (Botany) anatomy botany zoology a covering, lining, or enveloping membrane of an organ or part. See also tunica
3. (Roman Catholic Church) chiefly RC Church another word for tunicle
[Old English tunice (unattested except in the accusative case), from Latin tunica]

tu•nic

(ˈtu nɪk, ˈtyu-)

n.
1. a coat worn as part of a military or other uniform.
2. a gownlike outer garment worn by the ancient Greeks and Romans.
3.
a. a woman's straight, usu. sleeveless upper garment, loose or fitted, extending to the hips or below.
b. Also called tu′nic dress`. any of various dresses styled like this or incorporating this as one element.
4. tunicle.
5. a covering membrane, layer, or integument over an organ or part.
[1600–10; (< French tunique) < Latin tunica]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tunic - an enveloping or covering membrane or layer of body tissuetunic - an enveloping or covering membrane or layer of body tissue
tissue layer, membrane - a pliable sheet of tissue that covers or lines or connects the organs or cells of animals or plants
albuginea - whitish tunic
2.tunic - any of a variety of loose fitting cloaks extending to the hips or kneestunic - any of a variety of loose fitting cloaks extending to the hips or knees
chiton - a woolen tunic worn by men and women in ancient Greece
cloak - a loose outer garment
gymslip - a sleeveless tunic worn by English girls as part of a school uniform
kameez - a long tunic worn by many people from the Indian subcontinent (usually with a salwar or churidars)
kirtle - a garment resembling a tunic that was worn by men in the Middle Ages
surcoat - a tunic worn over a knight's armor
tabard - a short sleeveless outer tunic emblazoned with a coat of arms; worn by a knight over his armor or by a herald
Translations
رِداء نِسائي ذو حِزام حَوْل الخَصْرسُتْرَة عَسْكَرْيَّه تُشَد بِحِزام
tunikablůza
blusetunikauniformsjakke
tunikazubbony
hermanna-/lögreglujakkikyrtillmussa
mundurastunika
mundieristunika
tunika
asker/polis ceketikısa cekettünik

tunic

[ˈtjuːnɪk] Ntúnica f (Brit) (Mil) → guerrera f, blusa f

tunic

[ˈtjuːnɪk] ntunique f

tunic

nKasack m, → Hemdbluse f; (of uniform)Uniformrock m; (of school uniform)Kittel m; (in ancient Greece) → Chiton m; (in ancient Rome) → Tunika f

tunic

[ˈtjuːnɪk] ntunica

tunic

(ˈtjuːnik) noun
1. a soldier's or policeman's jacket.
2. a loose garment worn especially in ancient Greece and Rome.
3. a similar type of modern garment.

tu·nic

n. túnica, membrana protectora;
___ adventitia___ adventicia;
___ albugineacápsula albugínea;
___ externa___ externa;
___ interna___ interna;
___ media___ media;
___ mucosa___ mucosa;
___ muscularis___ muscular;
___ serosa___ serosa;
___ vaginalis___ vaginal.
References in classic literature ?
One was an aged, dignified, stern-looking gentleman, clad as for a solemn festival in grave and costly attire, but with a great bloodstain on his richly wrought band; the second, an aged man, meanly dressed, with a dark and malign countenance, and a broken halter about his neck; the third, a person not so advanced in life as the former two, but beyond the middle age, wearing a coarse woollen tunic and leather breeches, and with a carpenter's rule sticking out of his side pocket.
He wore a dark feather in his hat, a border of embroidery on his cloak, and a black velvet tunic beneath -- a gentleman advanced in years, with a hard experience written in his wrinkles.
It wore a tunic of the purest white, and round its waist was bound a lustrous belt, the sheen of which was beautiful.
His dress was a tunic of forest green, furred at the throat and cuffs with what was called minever; a kind of fur inferior in quality to ermine, and formed, it is believed, of the skin of the grey squirrel.
So he seized a loaf when no one was looking and stowed it away under his tunic.
Sancho Panza, who was coming on close behind puffing and blowing, seeing him fall, cried out to his assailant not to strike him again, for he was poor enchanted knight, who had never harmed anyone all the days of his life; but what checked the clown was, not Sancho's shouting, but seeing that Don Quixote did not stir hand or foot; and so, fancying he had killed him, he hastily hitched up his tunic under his girdle and took to his heels across the country like a deer.
Robin had not forgot the gentle arts taught by his mother, and he wore his fine red velvet tunic and breeches with the grace of a courtier.
Her head and neck, shoulders, ears, arms, hands, and toes were loaded down with jewels and gems with bracelets, earrings, and rings; while a tunic bordered with gold, and covered with a light muslin robe, betrayed the outline of her form.
He was a slight creature--perhaps four feet high--clad in a purple tunic, girdled at the waist with a leather belt.
At this moment the tapestry moved aside, and a Nubian, black as ebony, and dressed in a plain white tunic, made a sign to his master that all was prepared in the dining-room.
As she spoke Minerva touched him with her wand and covered him with wrinkles, took away all his yellow hair, and withered the flesh over his whole body; she bleared his eyes, which were naturally very fine ones; she changed his clothes and threw an old rag of a wrap about him, and a tunic, tattered, filthy, and begrimed with smoke; she also gave him an undressed deer skin as an outer garment, and furnished him with a staff and a wallet all in holes, with a twisted thong for him to sling it over his shoulder.
At other times, when rambling among the groves, or visiting at the houses of her acquaintances, she wore a tunic of white tappa, reaching from her waist to a little below the knees; and when exposed for any length of time to the sun, she invariably protected herself from its rays by a floating mantle of--the same material, loosely gathered about the person.