tunic


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tu·nic

 (to͞o′nĭk, tyo͞o′-)
n.
1.
a. A loose-fitting garment, sleeved or sleeveless, extending to the knees and worn especially in ancient Greece and Rome.
b. A medieval surcoat.
2. A long, plain, close-fitting jacket, usually having a stiff high collar and worn as part of a uniform.
3. A loose-fitting, pullover, collarless shirt that falls to the hip or thigh and is often drawn in at the waist and worn over leggings or pants.
4. Anatomy A coat or layer enveloping an organ or part.
5. Botany A loose membranous outer covering of a bulb or corm, as of an onion, tulip, or crocus.
6. See tunicle.

[Middle English tunik, from Old French tunique, from Latin tunica, of Phoenician origin; akin to Hebrew kuttōnet, kətōnet, from Central Semitic *kuttān, *kittān; see chiton.]

tunic

(ˈtjuːnɪk)
n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) any of various hip-length or knee-length garments, such as the loose sleeveless garb worn in ancient Greece or Rome, the jacket of some soldiers, or a woman's hip-length garment, worn with a skirt or trousers
2. (Botany) anatomy botany zoology a covering, lining, or enveloping membrane of an organ or part. See also tunica
3. (Roman Catholic Church) chiefly RC Church another word for tunicle
[Old English tunice (unattested except in the accusative case), from Latin tunica]

tu•nic

(ˈtu nɪk, ˈtyu-)

n.
1. a coat worn as part of a military or other uniform.
2. a gownlike outer garment worn by the ancient Greeks and Romans.
3.
a. a woman's straight, usu. sleeveless upper garment, loose or fitted, extending to the hips or below.
b. Also called tu′nic dress`. any of various dresses styled like this or incorporating this as one element.
4. tunicle.
5. a covering membrane, layer, or integument over an organ or part.
[1600–10; (< French tunique) < Latin tunica]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tunic - an enveloping or covering membrane or layer of body tissuetunic - an enveloping or covering membrane or layer of body tissue
tissue layer, membrane - a pliable sheet of tissue that covers or lines or connects the organs or cells of animals or plants
albuginea - whitish tunic
2.tunic - any of a variety of loose fitting cloaks extending to the hips or kneestunic - any of a variety of loose fitting cloaks extending to the hips or knees
chiton - a woolen tunic worn by men and women in ancient Greece
cloak - a loose outer garment
gymslip - a sleeveless tunic worn by English girls as part of a school uniform
kameez - a long tunic worn by many people from the Indian subcontinent (usually with a salwar or churidars)
kirtle - a garment resembling a tunic that was worn by men in the Middle Ages
surcoat - a tunic worn over a knight's armor
tabard - a short sleeveless outer tunic emblazoned with a coat of arms; worn by a knight over his armor or by a herald
Translations
رِداء نِسائي ذو حِزام حَوْل الخَصْرسُتْرَة عَسْكَرْيَّه تُشَد بِحِزام
tunikablůza
blusetunikauniformsjakke
tunikazubbony
hermanna-/lögreglujakkikyrtillmussa
mundurastunika
mundieristunika
tunika
asker/polis ceketikısa cekettünik

tunic

[ˈtjuːnɪk] Ntúnica f (Brit) (Mil) → guerrera f, blusa f

tunic

[ˈtjuːnɪk] ntunique f

tunic

nKasack m, → Hemdbluse f; (of uniform)Uniformrock m; (of school uniform)Kittel m; (in ancient Greece) → Chiton m; (in ancient Rome) → Tunika f

tunic

[ˈtjuːnɪk] ntunica

tunic

(ˈtjuːnik) noun
1. a soldier's or policeman's jacket.
2. a loose garment worn especially in ancient Greece and Rome.
3. a similar type of modern garment.

tu·nic

n. túnica, membrana protectora;
___ adventitia___ adventicia;
___ albugineacápsula albugínea;
___ externa___ externa;
___ interna___ interna;
___ media___ media;
___ mucosa___ mucosa;
___ muscularis___ muscular;
___ serosa___ serosa;
___ vaginalis___ vaginal.
References in classic literature ?
His tiny surcoat of scarlet velvet was rich with embroidery, while beneath was a close-fitting tunic of white silk.
We were not very early risers--the sun would be shooting his golden spikes above the Happar mountain, ere I threw aside my tappa robe, and girding my long tunic about my waist, sallied out with Fayaway and Kory-Kory, and the rest of the household, and bent my steps towards the stream.
Robin had not forgot the gentle arts taught by his mother, and he wore his fine red velvet tunic and breeches with the grace of a courtier.
They were clothed in a sort of tunic of light cloth which reached to the knees.
In addition to the deer-skin tunic which constituted the major portion of their apparel, each carried a light blanket of barbaric yet beautiful design--the first evidence of weaving I had seen in Caspak.
Close to the corner of the chimney sat a middle-aged gleeman, clad in a faded garb of Norwich cloth, the tunic of which was so outgrown that it did not fasten at the neck and at the waist.
So he seized a loaf when no one was looking and stowed it away under his tunic.
At tea all sat in their accustomed places: Nicholas beside the stove at a small table where his tea was handed to him; Milka, the old gray borzoi bitch (daughter of the first Milka), with a quite gray face and large black eyes that seemed more prominent than ever, lay on the armchair beside him; Denisov, whose curly hair, mustache, and whiskers had turned half gray, sat beside countess Mary with his general's tunic unbuttoned; Pierre sat between his wife and the old countess.
He was clothed in tight-fitting nether garments and a loose, sleeveless tunic that fell just below his hips, while his feet were shod in soft-soled sandals, the wrappings of which extended halfway to his knees, closely resembling a modern spiral military legging.
This was the hero's dress of charioteering that he put on: his soft tunic of deer skin, so that it did not restrain the movement of his hands outside.
Meanwhile Monte Cristo had rapidly taken off his great-coat, waistcoat, and shirt, and one might distinguish by the glimmering through the open panel that he wore a pliant tunic of steel mail, of which the last in France, where daggers are no longer dreaded, was worn by King Louis XVI.
Her mother, in contriving the child's garb, had allowed the gorgeous tendencies of her imagination their full play, arraying her in a crimson velvet tunic of a peculiar cut, abundantly embroidered in fantasies and flourishes of gold thread.