tunny


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Related to tunny: gunny

tun·ny

 (tŭn′ē)
n. pl. tunny or tun·nies
See tuna1.

[Italian tonno or French thon, both from Old Provençal ton, from Latin thunnus, thynnus, from Greek thunnos.]

tunny

(ˈtʌnɪ)
n, pl -nies or -ny
(Animals) another name for tuna1
[C16: from Old French thon, from Old Provençal ton, from Latin thunnus, from Greek]

tu•na1

(ˈtu nə, ˈtyu-)

n., pl. (esp. collectively) -na, (esp. for kinds or species) -nas.
1. any of several large marine food and game fishes of the family Scombridae, including the albacore, bluefin tuna, and yellowfin tuna.
2. any of various related fishes.
3. Also called tu′na fish`. the flesh of the tuna, used as food.
[1880–85, Amer.; < American Spanish, variant of Sp atún < Arabic al the + tūn < Greek thýnnos tunny]

tu•na2

(ˈtu nə, ˈtyu-)

n., pl. -nas.
1. any of various prickly pears, esp. either of two erect, treelike species, Opuntia tuna or O. ficus-indica, of Mexico, bearing a sweet, edible fruit.
2. the fruit of these plants.
[1545–55; < Sp < Taino]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tunny - important warm-water fatty fish of the genus Thunnus of the family Scombridaetunny - important warm-water fatty fish of the genus Thunnus of the family Scombridae; usually served as steaks
tunny, tuna - any very large marine food and game fish of the genus Thunnus; related to mackerel; chiefly of warm waters
saltwater fish - flesh of fish from the sea used as food
albacore - relatively small tuna with choice white flesh; major source of canned tuna
bonito - flesh of mostly Pacific food fishes of the genus Sarda of the family Scombridae; related to but smaller than tuna
bluefin, bluefin tuna - flesh of very large tuna
2.tunny - any very large marine food and game fish of the genus Thunnustunny - any very large marine food and game fish of the genus Thunnus; related to mackerel; chiefly of warm waters
food fish - any fish used for food by human beings
scombroid, scombroid fish - important marine food and game fishes found in all tropical and temperate seas; some are at least partially endothermic and can thrive in colder waters
genus Thunnus, Thunnus - tunas: warm-blooded fishes
long-fin tunny, Thunnus alalunga, albacore - large pelagic tuna the source of most canned tuna; reaches 93 pounds and has long pectoral fins; found worldwide in tropical and temperate waters
horse mackerel, Thunnus thynnus, bluefin, bluefin tuna - largest tuna; to 1500 pounds; of mostly temperate seas: feed in polar regions but breed in tropics
Thunnus albacares, yellowfin, yellowfin tuna - may reach 400 pounds; worldwide in tropics
tuna fish, tunny, tuna - important warm-water fatty fish of the genus Thunnus of the family Scombridae; usually served as steaks
Translations

tunny

[ˈtʌnɪ] N (tunny, tunnies (pl)) → atún m
striped tunnybonito m

tunny

[ˈtʌni] nthon m

tunny (fish)

nThunfisch m
References in classic literature ?
I remarked, among others, some germons, a species of mackerel as large as a tunny, with bluish sides, and striped with transverse bands, that disappear with the animal's life.
It is I, a poor Tunny swallowed by the Shark at the same time as you.
Neither do I," said the Tunny, "but I am wise enough to think that if one is born a fish, it is more dignified to die under the water than in the frying pan.
Mine is an opinion," replied the Tunny, "and opinions should be respected.
Rick met Greg "Lou" Armstrong in 1981 while serving as Navy divers onboard the USS Tunny, a Fast Attack nuclear submarine.
They captured 10 blackfin tunas using hook-and-line gear, 7/0 circle hooks and chunks of little tunny.
Head of ystanbul Sea and Animal Products Exporters' Union Ahmet Tuncay Sagun stated that there will be abundancy in anchovy and tunny this year.
The Nunthorpe 20-year-old plays Whatsername and will be joined by Alexis Gerred as Tunny, Steve Rushton as Will and Aaron Sidwell as Johnny.
Pelagic species, primarily little tunny (Euthynnus alletteratus] and king mackerel (Scomberomorus cavalla), were caught infrequently (<1% of the total catch) during normal bottom fishing activities during both open and closed seasons.
In European cases, northern bluefin tuna [Thunnus thynnus), at 28 kya in Gorham's Cave, Gibraltar, is doubtfully cultural (Morales-Muniz & Rosello-Izquierdo 2008), and bluefin and little tunny (Euthynnus alleteratus) occur only sparsely in Holocene levels at Cueva de Nerja, Spain (Morales-Muniz & Rosello-Izquierdo 2008).
8) Within the individual word lists, lapses in English-language renderings seem to stem principally from the authors' having slipped momentarily into their native phonetic, syntactic, or lexical habits, such as are apparent in "an hairs-brush" (una spazzola per capelli [24]), "a vegetable slaughter" (un tagliarape [25]), "some tunny picked" (del tonno marinato ['pickled;' 28]), "to ai-orn" and "ai-orningh" (stirare and la stiratura [37]), "a to be cold for letter" (una lettera fermo posta [38]) and "the worm season" (la stagione calda [41]).
Still, if we take it as given that friends Johnny, Will, Tunny and Heather are going to feel lost/angry and make such observations (especially Johnny) as "no one seems to really care," then fair enough.