turbid


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Related to turbid: delime

tur·bid

 (tûr′bĭd)
adj.
1. Having sediment or foreign particles stirred up or suspended; muddy: turbid water.
2. Heavy, dark, or dense, as smoke or fog.
3. In a state of turmoil; muddled: turbid feelings.

[Latin turbidus, disordered, from turba, turmoil, probably from Greek turbē.]

tur′bid·ly adv.
tur′bid·ness, tur·bid′i·ty n.

turbid

(ˈtɜːbɪd)
adj
1. muddy or opaque, as a liquid clouded with a suspension of particles
2. dense, thick, or cloudy: turbid fog.
3. in turmoil or confusion
[C17: from Latin turbidus, from turbāre to agitate, from turba crowd]
turˈbidity, ˈturbidness n
ˈturbidly adv

tur•bid

(ˈtɜr bɪd)

adj.
1. not clear or transparent because of stirred-up sediment or the like; clouded; opaque: turbid water.
2. thick or dense, as smoke or clouds.
3. confused; muddled; disturbed.
[1620–30; < Latin turbidus disturbed =turb(āre) to disturb (derivative of turba turmoil) + -idus -id4]
tur•bid′i•ty, tur′bid•ness, n.
tur′bid•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.turbid - (of liquids) clouded as with sediment; "a cloudy liquid"; "muddy coffee"; "murky waters"
opaque - not transmitting or reflecting light or radiant energy; impenetrable to sight; "opaque windows of the jail"; "opaque to X-rays"

turbid

adjective
1. Having sediment or foreign particles stirred up or suspended:
2. Heavy, dark, or dense, especially with impurities:
Translations

turbid

[ˈtɜːbɪd] ADJtúrbido

turbid

[ˈtɜːrbɪd] adj [water] → trouble

turbid

adj
liquidtrübe, schmutzig
(fig: = confused) → verworren

turbid

[ˈtɜːbɪd] adj (liquid) (fig) (situation) → torbido/a; (smoke, fog) → denso/a

tur·bid

a. turbio-a, túrbido-a; nebuloso-a.
References in classic literature ?
I leave a white and turbid wake; pale waters, paler cheeks, where'er I sail.
Behind the fog there was the flowing of water, the cracking and floating of ice, the swift rush of turbid, foaming torrents; and on the following Monday, in the evening, the fog parted, the storm clouds split up into little curling crests of cloud, the sky cleared, and the real spring had come.
It was now early spring, and the river was swollen and turbulent; great cakes of floating ice were swinging heavily to and fro in the turbid waters.
Carey stood for a few minutes and looked at it, it was turbid and yellow, [and who knows what thoughts passed through her mind?
All John Reed's violent tyrannies, all his sisters' proud indifference, all his mother's aversion, all the servants' partiality, turned up in my disturbed mind like a dark deposit in a turbid well.
He had not the usual resource of bigots in that superstitious period, most of whom were wont to atone for the crimes they were guilty of by liberality to the church, stupefying by this means their terrors by the idea of atonement and forgiveness; and although the refuge which success thus purchased, was no more like to the peace of mind which follows on sincere repentance, than the turbid stupefaction procured by opium resembles healthy and natural slumbers, it was still a state of mind preferable to the agonies of awakened remorse.
Five foaming streams, rushing through as many gorges, and swelled and turbid by the recent rains, united together in one mad plunge of nearly eighty feet, and fell with wild uproar into a deep black pool scooped out of the gloomy looking rocks that lay piled around, and thence in one collected body dashed down a narrow sloping channel which seemed to penetrate into the very bowels of the earth.
Below them was the Valley of the Missouri, about seven miles in breadth, clad in the fresh verdure of spring; enameled with flowers and interspersed with clumps and groves of noble trees, between which the mighty river poured its turbulent and turbid stream.
Although night and day the waves of the open Atlantic, turbid with sediment, are driven against the steep outside edges of this wall of stone, yet the oldest pilots know of no tradition of any change in its appearance.
In their front were stretched those broad plains, which extend, with so little diversity of character, to the bases of the Rocky Mountains; and many long and dreary miles in their rear, foamed the swift and turbid waters of La Platte.
The shadow thickening and thickening as he approached its source, he thought of the secrets of the lonely church-vaults, where the people who had hoarded and secreted in iron coffers were in their turn similarly hoarded, not yet at rest from doing harm; and then of the secrets of the river, as it rolled its turbid tide between two frowning wildernesses of secrets, extending, thick and dense, for many miles, and warding off the free air and the free country swept by winds and wings of birds.
The turbid water, swollen by the heavy rain, was rushing rapidly on below; and all other sounds were lost in the noise of its plashing and eddying against the green and slimy piles.