turn-up


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.

turn-up

n
a turned-up cuff on the bottom of a trouser lega surprise; a shock
Translations

turn-up

[ˈtɜːnʌp] (Brit) N
1. [of trousers] → vuelta f
2. (= piece of luck) that was a turn-up for himen eso tuvo mucha suerte
that was a turn-up for the bookseso sí que no se esperaba

turn-up

[ˈtɜːnˌʌp] n
a. (Brit) (of trousers) → risvolto
b. that was a turn-up for the books (Brit) (fam) → è stato un colpo di scena

turn

(təːn) verb
1. to (make something) move or go round; to revolve. The wheels turned; He turned the handle.
2. to face or go in another direction. He turned and walked away; She turned towards him.
3. to change direction. The road turned to the left.
4. to direct; to aim or point. He turned his attention to his work.
5. to go round. They turned the corner.
6. to (cause something to) become or change to. You can't turn lead into gold; At what temperature does water turn into ice?
7. to (cause to) change colour to. Her hair turned white; The shock turned his hair white.
noun
1. an act of turning. He gave the handle a turn.
2. a winding or coil. There are eighty turns of wire on this aerial.
3. (also ˈturning) a point where one can change direction, eg where one road joins another. Take the third turn(ing) on/to the left.
4. one's chance or duty (to do, have etc something shared by several people). It's your turn to choose a record; You'll have to wait your turn in the bathroom.
5. one of a series of short circus or variety acts, or the person or persons who perform it. The show opened with a comedy turn.
ˈturning-point noun
a place where a turn is made. the turning-point in the race; a turning-point in his life.
ˈturnover noun
1. the total value of sales in a business during a certain time. The firm had a turnover of $100,000 last year.
2. the rate at which money or workers pass through a business.
ˈturnstile noun
a revolving gate which allows only one person to pass at a time, usually after payment of entrance fees etc. There is a turnstile at the entrance to the football ground.
ˈturntable noun
the revolving part of a record-player on which the record rests while it is being played. He put another record on the turntable so that people could dance to the music.
ˈturn-up noun
a piece of material which is folded up at the bottom of a trouser-leg. Trousers with turn-ups are not fashionable at the moment.
by turnsin turndo (someone) a good turn
to do something helpful for someone. He did me several good turns.
in turn, by turns
one after another, in regular order. They answered the teacher's questions in turn.
out of turn
out of the correct order.
speak out of turn
1. to speak without permission in class etc.
2. to say something when it is not your place to say it or something you should not have said.
take a turn for the better/worse
(of things or people) to become better or worse. His fortunes have taken a turn for the better; Her health has taken a turn for the worse.
take turns
(of two or more people) to do something one after the other, not at the same time. They took turns to look after the baby.
turn a blind eye
to pretend not to see or notice (something). Because he works so hard, his boss turns a blind eye when he comes in late.
turn against
to become dissatisfied with or hostile to (people or things that one previously liked etc). He turned against his friends.
turn away
to move or send away. He turned away in disgust; The police turned away the crowds.
turn back
to (cause to) go back in the opposite direction. He got tired and turned back; The travellers were turned back at the frontier.
turn down
1. to say `no' to; to refuse. He turned down her offer/request.
2. to reduce (the level of light, noise etc) produced by (something). Please turn down (the volume on) the radio – it's far too loud!
turn in
to hand over (a person or thing) to people in authority. They turned the escaped prisoner in to the police.
turn loose
to set free. He turned the horse loose in the field.
turn off
1. to cause (water, electricity etc) to stop flowing. I've turned off the water / the electricity.
2. to turn (a tap, switch etc) so that something stops. I turned off the tap.
3. to cause (something) to stop working by switching it off. He turned off the light / the oven.
turn on
1. to make water, elekctric current etc flow. He turned on the water / the gas.
2. to turn (a tap, switch etc) so that something works. I turned on the tap.
3. to cause (something) to work by switching it on. He turned on the radio.
4. to attack. The dog turned on him.
turn out
1. to send away; to make (someone) leave.
2. to make or produce. The factory turns out ten finished articles an hour.
3. to empty or clear. I turned out the cupboard.
4. (of a crowd) to come out; to get together for a (public) meeting, celebration etc. A large crowd turned out to see the procession.
5. to turn off. Turn out the light!
6. to happen or prove to be. He turned out to be right; It turned out that he was right.
turn over
to give (something) up (to). He turned the money over to the police.
turn up
1. to appear or arrive. He turned up at our house.
2. to be found. Don't worry – it'll turn up again.
3. to increase (the level of noise, light etc) produced by (something). Turn up (the volume on) the radio.
References in classic literature ?
I was passable enough when I went with the tinker, though nothing to boast of then; but what with blowing the fire with my mouth when I was young, and spileing my complexion, and singeing my hair off, and swallering the smoke, and what with being nat'rally unfort'nate in the way of running against hot metal and marking myself by sich means, and what with having turn-ups with the tinker as I got older, almost whenever he was too far gone in drink--which was almost always--my beauty was queer, wery queer, even at that time.
Pictured, Peter Watson, 25, of Middlesbrough, sitting, models: turn-up chinos, pounds 24.
Ohio, USA in which Valco Cincinnati will market, manufacture, and deliver Metso Paper's tissue turn-up system to the global market.
Carriers can combine the FTB-88100NGE with EXFO s optical modules, such as an optical spectrum analyzer, making it the perfect kit for field commissioning and turn-up.
Sophie walks through the park dressed in Burberry turn-up jeans (2-12yrs, pounds 58-pounds 62), satin shoulder T-shirt (4yrs-16yrs, pounds 35-pounds 44), crop trench coat (4yrs-16yrs, pounds 147-pounds 182), turnup hat (pounds 37) and black boots by Diesel (pounds 62).
but worn with plain silk T-shirt with a turn-up sleeve (tucked in and folded out), or a light knit, you'll steer clear of comparisons to the X Factor winners.
Jersey fan print dress, pounds 225; Gloss corduroy jacket, pounds 290, and culottes, pounds 220, with striped jersey yoke front top, pounds 185; Striped short sleeve scoop-neck top, pounds 165, and wool peplum skirt, pounds 195; Striped short sleeve scoop-neck top, pounds 165, and wool wide leg trousers with turn-up, pounds 240; Long sleeve cowl-neck fan print top, pounds 195, and wool wide leg trousers with turn up, pounds 240; Jersey wrap dress with satin applique, pounds 245; The fan-inspired print used throughout the collection; Jersey top with satin applique, pounds 195
Make it wearable No need to invest in anything new - a turn-up can be added to jeans, jackets, coats, cardigans, anything you want.
The wide, straight-legged turn-up trouser has been an icon of bad taste ever since the Bay City Rollers claimed them as their own and wore them white with tartan turn- ups half-way up their ankles.
Like most trousers of the period, they had deep turn-ups.