turnpike


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turn·pike

 (tûrn′pīk′)
n.
1. Abbr. Tnpk. or Tpk. A toll road, especially an expressway on which tolls are charged.
2. A tollgate.

[Middle English turnepike, spiked barrier : turnen, to turn; see turn + pike, sharp point; see pike5.]

turnpike

(ˈtɜːnˌpaɪk)
n
1. (Historical Terms) (between the mid-16th and late 19th centuries)
a. gates or some other barrier set across a road to prevent passage until a toll had been paid
b. a road on which a turnpike was operated
2. an obsolete word for turnstile1
3. (Civil Engineering) US a motorway for use of which a toll is charged
[C15: from turn + pike2]

turn•pike

(ˈtɜrnˌpaɪk)

n.
1. a high-speed highway, esp. one maintained by tolls.
2. (formerly) a barrier set across such a highway to stop passage until a toll has been paid.
[1375–1425; late Middle English turnepike road barrier (in definition 1, short for turnpike road). See turn, pike2]
highway, expressway, freeway, parkway, turnpike - A highway is a main road, while an expressway is a multilane highway; freeways, parkways, and turnpikes are types of expressways.
See also related terms for highway.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.turnpike - (from 16th to 19th centuries) gates set across a road to prevent passage until a toll had been paidturnpike - (from 16th to 19th centuries) gates set across a road to prevent passage until a toll had been paid
gate - a movable barrier in a fence or wall
2.turnpike - an expressway on which tolls are collectedturnpike - an expressway on which tolls are collected
expressway, freeway, motorway, pike, state highway, superhighway, throughway, thruway - a broad highway designed for high-speed traffic

turnpike

noun
A course affording passage from one place to another:
Translations
autopista de peaje

turnpike

[ˈtɜːnpaɪk] N
1. (Hist) → barrera f de portazgo
2. (US) (Aut) → autopista f de peaje

turnpike

[ˈtɜːrnpaɪk] n (US)autoroute f à péageturn signal n (US) (in car)clignotant m

turnpike

[ˈtɜːnˌpaɪk] n (Am) (Aut) → autostrada (a pagamento)
References in classic literature ?
The roads were stony, having been recently mended; going over them at this pace, my shoe became looser, and as we neared the turnpike gate it came off.
Traddles, whom I have taken up by appointment at the turnpike, presents a dazzling combination of cream colour and light blue; and both he and Mr.
The turnpike lamp was a blur, quite out of the lamp's usual place apparently, and its rays looked solid substance on the fog.
But it was nestled in a snug well-wooded hollow, quite an hour's journey on horseback from any turnpike, where it was never reached by the vibrations of the coach-horn, or of public opinion.
Only once did I perceive a human being, and that was at the intersection of our crossroad with the wide, white turnpike which cuts each cultivated district longitudinally at its exact center.
I met one of th' 148th Maine boys an' he ses his brigade fit th' hull rebel army fer four hours over on th' turnpike road an' killed about five thousand of 'em.
Dominicus was now on the Kimballton turnpike, having all along determined to visit that place, though business had drawn him out of the most direct road from Morristown.
The difficult mountain A smoke and consultation The captain's speech An icy turnpike Danger of a false step Arrival on Snake River Return to Portneuf Meeting of comrades
let me see—perhaps he had my name put in the bill for the new turnpike, as a director.
He praised the pine-woods, the deep lasts of bracken, the crimson leaves that spotted the hurt-bushes, the serviceable beauty of the turnpike road.
We can't get there anyhow, without walking right through it, or else going round the Turnpike way; and that would make us so very late
There are some worthless articles of clothing in the old portmanteau; there is a bundle of pawnbrokers' duplicates, those turnpike tickets on the road of poverty; there is a crumpled paper, smelling of opium, on which are scrawled rough memoranda--as, took, such a day, so many grains; took, such another day, so many more-- begun some time ago, as if with the intention of being regularly continued, but soon left off.