tweed


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Tweed

 (twēd)
A river, about 160 km (100 mi) long, of southeast Scotland forming part of the Scottish-English border. It flows eastward to the North Sea and has rich salmon fisheries.

tweed

 (twēd)
n.
1. A coarse, rugged, often nubby woolen fabric made in any of various twill weaves and used chiefly for casual suits and coats.
2. tweeds Clothing made of this fabric.

[Alteration (influenced by the river Tweed) of Scots tweel, twill, from Middle English twile; see twill.]

tweed

(twiːd)
n
1. (Textiles)
a. a thick woollen often knobbly cloth produced originally in Scotland
b. (as modifier): a tweed coat.
2. (Clothing & Fashion) (plural) clothes made of this cloth, esp a man's or woman's suit
3. (Clothing & Fashion) (plural) informal Austral trousers
[C19: probably from tweel, a Scottish variant of twill, influenced by Tweed]

Tweed

(twiːd)
n
(Placename) a river in SE Scotland and NE England, flowing east and forming part of the border between Scotland and England, then crossing into England to enter the North Sea at Berwick. Length: 156 km (97 miles)

tweed

(twid)

n.
1. a coarse wool cloth in a variety of weaves and colors, produced esp. in Scotland.
2. tweeds, garments made of this cloth.
[1835–45; appar. back formation from Scots tweedling twilling (now obsolete), of obscure orig.]

Tweed

(twid)

n.
1. William Marcy ( “Boss Tweed” ), 1823–78, U.S. politician.
2. a river flowing E from S Scotland along part of the NE boundary of England into the North Sea. 97 mi. (156 km) long.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tweed - thick woolen fabric used for clothingtweed - thick woolen fabric used for clothing; originated in Scotland
cloth, fabric, textile, material - artifact made by weaving or felting or knitting or crocheting natural or synthetic fibers; "the fabric in the curtains was light and semitransparent"; "woven cloth originated in Mesopotamia around 5000 BC"; "she measured off enough material for a dress"
Harris Tweed - a loosely woven tweed made in the Outer Hebrides
wool, woolen, woollen - a fabric made from the hair of sheep
2.tweed - (usually in the plural) trousers made of flannel or gabardine or tweed or white clothtweed - (usually in the plural) trousers made of flannel or gabardine or tweed or white cloth
trouser, pant - (usually in the plural) a garment extending from the waist to the knee or ankle, covering each leg separately; "he had a sharp crease in his trousers"
plural, plural form - the form of a word that is used to denote more than one
Translations
تْويد: نَسيج صوفي غَليظ
tvíd
tweed
tweed
tvíd
tvidas
tvīda audumstvīds
tweed
tvídtvídový
tüvid

tweed

[twiːd] N
1. (= cloth) → tweed m
2. tweeds (= suit) → traje msing de tweed

tweed

[ˈtwiːd]
ntweed m
modif [jacket, skirt, suit, cap] → en tweed, de tweed tweeds
npl (= tweed suit) (man's)costume m en tweed; (woman's)tailleur m en tweed
dressed in tweeds → habillé(e) de tweed

tweed

n
(= cloth)Tweed m
tweeds pl (= clothes)Tweedkleidung f, → Tweedsachen pl; his old tweedssein alter Tweedanzug, seine alten Tweedsachen
adjTweed-; tweed jacketTweedjacke f

tweed

[twiːd] n (cloth) → tweed m tweeds npl (suit) → abito di tweed

tweed

(twiːd) noun, adjective
(of) a kind of woollen cloth with a rough surface. His suit was (made of) tweed; a tweed jacket.
References in classic literature ?
The Tweed had been a wooden vessel, and he brought the tradition of quick passages with him into the iron clipper.
He was dressed in a suit of English tweed, with an ulster on his arm, and a valise in his hand.
He judged there was no time to be lost, and that the Tweed was not so far distant from the Thames that an army could not march from one river to the other, particularly when it was well commanded.
Happily for me, my acquaintance among the Rosalinds of the bicycle, at this period of my life, was but slight, and thus no familiarity with the tweed knickerbocker feminine took off the edge of my delight on first beholding Nicolete clothed in like manhood with ourselves, and yet, delicious paradox
Westmacott clad in a heather tweed pea-jacket, a skirt which just{?
Trent was carelessly dressed in a tweed suit and red tie, his critic wore a silk hat and frock coat, patent-leather boots, and a dark tie of invisible pattern.
Afterwards he took a taxi and called at his rooms, walked restlessly up and down while Jarvis threw a few clothes into a bag, changed his own apparel for a rough tweed suit, and drove to Paddington.
Early in the last century one of the picturesque race of robbers and murderers, practicing the vices of humanity on the borderlands watered by the river Tweed, built a tower of stone on the coast of Northumberland.
The Duke, in a very old tweed coat, but immaculate as to linen and the details of his toilet, stood a little apart, with a frown upon his forehead, and exactly that absorbed air which in the House of Lords usually indicated his intention to make a speech.
He was a strange figure as he stood there, for he had assumed a flapped fantastic hat and swinging baldric and cutlass in his capacity of bandit king, but the bright prosaic tweed of the courier showed through in patches all over him.
In his tweed suit and cloth cap he looked like any other tourist upon the moor, and he had contrived, with that catlike love of personal cleanliness which was one of his characteristics, that his chin should be as smooth and his linen as perfect as if he were in Baker Street.
And at home, in his beloved Abbotsford, in the still splendor of an autumn day, with the meadow-scented air he loved fanning his face, and the sound of rippling Tweed in his ears, he closed his eyes for ever.