tweedy

(redirected from tweedier)
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tweed·y

 (twē′dē)
adj. tweed·i·er, tweed·i·est
1. Made of tweed.
2. Wearing tweeds.
3. Informal Suggestive of casual, informal taste, habits, and lifestyle: "He's rumpled and tweedy ... if he were preparing to drink a martini, he might casually stir it with his finger" (Phil McCombs).

tweedy

(ˈtwiːdɪ)
adj, tweedier or tweediest
1. (Clothing & Fashion) of, made of, or resembling tweed
2. showing a fondness for a hearty outdoor life, usually associated with wearers of tweeds
ˈtweediness n

tweed•y

(ˈtwi di)

adj. tweed•i•er, tweed•i•est.
1. made of or resembling tweed, as in texture or appearance.
2. wearing tweeds, esp. as a mark of a casual or outdoor life.
[1910–15]
tweed′i•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.tweedy - of textilestweedy - of textiles; having a rough surface; "a sweater knitted of nubbly homespun yarns"
rough, unsmooth - having or caused by an irregular surface; "trees with rough bark"; "rough ground"; "rough skin"; "rough blankets"; "his unsmooth face"
2.tweedy - (of country gentry) informal, clannish and outdoorsy
upper-class - occupying the highest socioeconomic position in a society
Translations

tweedy

[ˈtwiːdɪ] ADJcon traje de tweed, vestido de tweed (fig) → aristocrático (y rural)

tweedy

adj (+er) materialtweedartig; clothesaus Tweed; (fig) person, shopkonservativ; tweedy jacketTweedjacke f
References in periodicals archive ?
YOUR relationship planet, Venus, takes off her bush jacket and gets into something a little tweedier as she starts to move in on your working life.
Your relationship planet Venus takes off her bush jacket and gets into something a little tweedier as she starts to move in on your working life.
She picked up the character again 10 years later and she was a little different - tweedier, sturdier, kinder.
When Christie picked up the character 10 years later it was a tweedier, sturdier person, and obviously I m not going to do a pale imitation of Geraldine so I went for the other one.
The nub of Dollimore's critique of modern criticism is this: for all its savvy transcendence of a tweedier past, it's frightened of life.