twig


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

twig 1

 (twĭg)
n.
1. A young shoot representing the current season's growth of a woody plant.
2. Any small, leafless branch of a woody plant.

[Middle English, from Old English twigge; see dwo- in Indo-European roots.]

twig 2

 (twĭg)
v. twigged, twig·ging, twigs Chiefly British
v.tr.
1. To observe or notice.
2. To understand or figure out: "The layman has twigged what the strategist twigged almost two decades ago" (Manchester Guardian Weekly).
v.intr.
To be or become aware of the situation; understand: "As Europe is now twigging, the best breeding ground for innovators who know how to do business is often big, competitive companies" (Economist).

[Perhaps from Irish Gaelic tuig-, stem of tuigim, I understand, from Old Irish tuicim.]

twig 3

 (twĭg)
n. Archaic
The current style; the fashion.

[Origin unknown.]

twig

(twɪɡ)
n
1. (Botany) any small branch or shoot of a tree or other woody plant
2. (Anatomy) something resembling this, esp a minute branch of a blood vessel
[Old English twigge; related to Old Norse dvika consisting of two, Old High German zwīg twig, Old Danish tvige fork]
ˈtwigˌlike adj

twig

(twɪɡ)
vb, twigs, twigging or twigged
1. to understand (something)
2. to find out or suddenly comprehend (something): he hasn't twigged yet.
3. (tr) rare to perceive (something)
[C18: perhaps from Gaelic tuig I understand]

twig1

(twɪg)

n.
a small, thin offshoot of a wooden branch or stem.
[before 950; Middle English; Old English twig, twigge; akin to Middle Low German twīch, Old High German zwīg (akin to twi-)]
twig′gy, adj. -gi•er, -gi•est.

twig2

(twɪg)

v. twigged, twig•ging. Brit. v.t.
1. to look at; observe.
2. to understand.
v.i.
3. to understand.
[1755–65; probably < base of Irish tuigim I understand; compare dig2]

twig


Past participle: twigged
Gerund: twigging

Imperative
twig
twig
Present
I twig
you twig
he/she/it twigs
we twig
you twig
they twig
Preterite
I twigged
you twigged
he/she/it twigged
we twigged
you twigged
they twigged
Present Continuous
I am twigging
you are twigging
he/she/it is twigging
we are twigging
you are twigging
they are twigging
Present Perfect
I have twigged
you have twigged
he/she/it has twigged
we have twigged
you have twigged
they have twigged
Past Continuous
I was twigging
you were twigging
he/she/it was twigging
we were twigging
you were twigging
they were twigging
Past Perfect
I had twigged
you had twigged
he/she/it had twigged
we had twigged
you had twigged
they had twigged
Future
I will twig
you will twig
he/she/it will twig
we will twig
you will twig
they will twig
Future Perfect
I will have twigged
you will have twigged
he/she/it will have twigged
we will have twigged
you will have twigged
they will have twigged
Future Continuous
I will be twigging
you will be twigging
he/she/it will be twigging
we will be twigging
you will be twigging
they will be twigging
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been twigging
you have been twigging
he/she/it has been twigging
we have been twigging
you have been twigging
they have been twigging
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been twigging
you will have been twigging
he/she/it will have been twigging
we will have been twigging
you will have been twigging
they will have been twigging
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been twigging
you had been twigging
he/she/it had been twigging
we had been twigging
you had been twigging
they had been twigging
Conditional
I would twig
you would twig
he/she/it would twig
we would twig
you would twig
they would twig
Past Conditional
I would have twigged
you would have twigged
he/she/it would have twigged
we would have twigged
you would have twigged
they would have twigged
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.twig - a small branch or division of a branch (especially a terminal division)twig - a small branch or division of a branch (especially a terminal division); usually applied to branches of the current or preceding year
brier - a thorny stem or twig
branch - a division of a stem, or secondary stem arising from the main stem of a plant
wand - a thin supple twig or rod; "stems bearing slender wands of flowers"
withy, withe - strong flexible twig
Verb1.twig - branch out in a twiglike mannertwig - branch out in a twiglike manner; "The lightning bolt twigged in several directions"
furcate, branch, fork, ramify, separate - divide into two or more branches so as to form a fork; "The road forks"
2.twig - understand, usually after some initial difficultytwig - understand, usually after some initial difficulty; "She didn't know what her classmates were plotting but finally caught on"
apprehend, comprehend, get the picture, grok, savvy, grasp, compass, dig - get the meaning of something; "Do you comprehend the meaning of this letter?"

twig

1
noun branch, stick, sprig, offshoot, shoot, spray, withe There was a slight sound of a twig breaking underfoot.

twig

2
verb (Brit. informal) understand, get, see, find out, grasp, make out, rumble (Brit. informal), catch on (informal), comprehend, fathom, tumble to (informal) By the time she'd twigged what it was all about, it was too late.

twig

verb
Chiefly British. To perceive and recognize the meaning of:
Informal: savvy.
Slang: dig.
Scots: ken.
Translations
غُصَيْن
větvička
kvist
varpu
sproti, kvistur
小枝気づく
zariņš
vejica
kvist
ince dalsürgün

twig

1 [twɪg] N
1. [of wood] → ramita f
2. twigs (for fire) → leña f menuda

twig

2 [twɪg] (Brit)
A. VT (= understand) → caer en la cuenta de
B. VIcaer en la cuenta

twig

[ˈtwɪg]
nbrindille f
vtpiger
vipiger

twig

1
n (= thin branch)Zweig m

twig

2 (Brit inf)
vt (= realize)mitkriegen (inf), → mitbekommen; when she saw his face, she twigged his secretals sie sein Gesicht sah, erriet sie sein Geheimnis (inf); he’s twigged iter hats kapiert (inf)
vischalten (inf), → es mitkriegen (inf)or mitbekommen

twig

1 [twɪg] nramoscello

twig

2 [twɪg] vt & vi (fam) → capire

twig

(twig) noun
a small branch of a tree. The ground was covered with broken twigs.

twig

n. terminación o rama diminuta de un nervio o de una arteria.
References in classic literature ?
So he patiently broke twig after twig till he had made a little hole through which he peeped, saying imploringly,
But when we had followed it for many miles, without finding a single twig broken, as I had advised, my mind misgave me; especially as all the footsteps had the prints of moccasins.
Let us alight, as the birds do, and perch ourselves on the nearest twig, and consult wither we shall fly next
The profound depth of the minister's repose was the more remarkable, inasmuch as he was one of those persons whose sleep ordinarily is as light as fitful, and as easily scared away, as a small bird hopping on a twig.
It resembled that perpendicular seam sometimes made in the straight, lofty trunk of a great tree, when the upper lightning tearingly darts down it, and without wrenching a single twig, peels and grooves out the bark from top to bottom, ere running off into the soil, leaving the tree still greenly alive, but branded.
At the base of the mainmast, full beneath the doubloon and the flame, the parsee was kneeling in Ahab's front, but with his head bowed away from him; while near by, from the arched and overhanging rigging, where they had just been engaged securing a spar, a number of the seamen, arrested by the glare, now cohered together, and hung pendulous, like a knot of numbed wasps from a drooping, orchard twig.
So, it would seem, few and fewer thoughts visit each growing man from year to year, for the grove in our minds is laid waste--sold to feed unnecessary fires of ambition, or sent to mill--and there is scarcely a twig left for them to perch on.
The stems of the trees are trim and straight, and in many places all the ground is hidden for miles under a thick cushion of moss of a vivid green color, with not a decayed or ragged spot in its surface, and not a fallen leaf or twig to mar its immaculate tidiness.
Pretty soon I heard a twig snap down in the dark amongst the trees -- something was a stirring.
A catbird, the Northern mocker, lit in a tree over Tom's head, and trilled out her imitations of her neighbors in a rapture of enjoyment; then a shrill jay swept down, a flash of blue flame, and stopped on a twig almost within the boy's reach, cocked his head to one side and eyed the strangers with a consuming curiosity; a gray squirrel and a big fellow of the "fox" kind came skurrying along, sitting up at intervals to inspect and chatter at the boys, for the wild things had probably never seen a human being before and scarcely knew whether to be afraid or not.
The fact was that the ivory hook of the parasol had caught in the chain gear, and when the first attempt at drawing water was made, the little offering of a contrite heart was jerked up, bent, its strong ribs jammed into the well side, and entangled with a twig root.
He was very strong and clever with his knife and knew how to cut the dry and dead wood away, and could tell when an unpromising bough or twig had still green life in it.