twilight


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twi·light

 (twī′līt′)
n.
1.
a. The diffused light from the sky during the early evening or early morning when the sun is below the horizon and its light is refracted by the earth's atmosphere.
b. The time of the day when the sun is just below the horizon, especially the period between sunset and dark.
2. Dim or diffused illumination.
3. A period or condition of decline following growth, glory, or success: in the twilight of his life.
4. A state of ambiguity or obscurity.

[Middle English twilighte : Old English twi-, two, half; see dwo- in Indo-European roots + Old English līht, light; see light1.]

twilight

(ˈtwaɪˌlaɪt)
n
1. the soft diffused light occurring when the sun is just below the horizon, esp following sunset.
2. the period in which this light occurs
3. the period of time during which the sun is a specified angular distance below the horizon (6°, 12°, and 18° for civil twilight, nautical twilight, and astronomical twilight, respectively)
4. any faint light
5. a period in which strength, importance, etc, are waning: the twilight of his life.
6. (modifier)
a. of or relating to the period towards the end of the day: the twilight shift.
b. of or relating to the final phase of a particular era: the twilight days of the Bush presidency.
c. denoting irregularity and obscurity: a twilight existence.
[C15: literally: half-light (between day and night), from Old English twi- half + light1]
twilit adj

twi•light

(ˈtwaɪˌlaɪt)

n.
1. the soft, diffused light from the sky when the sun is below the horizon, either from daybreak to sunrise or, more commonly, from sunset to nightfall.
2. the period in the morning or, more commonly, in the evening during which this light prevails.
3. a terminal period, esp. after full development, success, etc.
4. a state of uncertainty, vagueness, or gloom.
adj.
5. of or resembling twilight; dim; obscure.
[1375–1425; late Middle English; see twi-, light1]

twilight

- The time of two lights, the fading sunset and the emerging light of the moon and stars; there are three sequential stages of twilight: civil twilight, nautical twilight, and astronomical twilight.
See also related terms for lights.

twilight

The periods of incomplete darkness following sunset and preceding sunrise. Twilight is designated as civil, nautical or astronomical, as the darker limit occurs when the center of the sun is 6 deg, 12 deg or 18 deg, respectively, below the celestial horizon.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.twilight - the time of day immediately following sunsettwilight - the time of day immediately following sunset; "he loved the twilight"; "they finished before the fall of night"
even, evening, eventide, eve - the latter part of the day (the period of decreasing daylight from late afternoon until nightfall); "he enjoyed the evening light across the lake"
night - a shortening of nightfall; "they worked from morning to night"
time of day, hour - clock time; "the hour is getting late"
2.twilight - the diffused light from the sky when the sun is below the horizon but its rays are refracted by the atmosphere of the earthtwilight - the diffused light from the sky when the sun is below the horizon but its rays are refracted by the atmosphere of the earth
light, visible light, visible radiation - (physics) electromagnetic radiation that can produce a visual sensation; "the light was filtered through a soft glass window"
3.twilight - a condition of decline following successestwilight - a condition of decline following successes; "in the twilight of the empire"
declination, decline - a condition inferior to an earlier condition; a gradual falling off from a better state
Adj.1.twilight - lighted by or as if by twilighttwilight - lighted by or as if by twilight; "The dusky night rides down the sky/And ushers in the morn"-Henry Fielding; "the twilight glow of the sky"; "a boat on a twilit river"
dark - devoid of or deficient in light or brightness; shadowed or black; "sitting in a dark corner"; "a dark day"; "dark shadows"; "dark as the inside of a black cat"

twilight

noun
1. dusk, evening, sunset, early evening, nightfall, sundown, gloaming (Scot. or poetic), close of day They returned at twilight and set off for the bar.
dusk morning, dawn, sunrise, daybreak, sunup
2. half-light, gloom, dimness, semi-darkness the deepening autumn twilight
3. decline, last years, final years, closing years, autumn, downturn, ebb, last phase Now they are both in the twilight of their careers.
decline height, peak, climax, crowning moment
adjective
1. evening, dim, darkening the summer twilight sky
2. declining, last, final, dying, ebbing the twilight years of the Hapsburg Empire
Related words
adjective crepuscular

twilight

noun
The period between afternoon and nighttime:
Archaic: even, vesper.
Translations
غَسَقفَتْرَة ضَعْف القُوَّه، إنخِفاض القُوَّه
šerosoumrak
skumringtusmørkenedgangsperiode
aamuhämäräepäselvähämäräiltahämärä
sumrak
hnignunljósaskipti
sutemos
krēslamijkrēslisnovakare
mrak
sumrak
alaca karanlıkçöküş devri

twilight

[ˈtwaɪlaɪt]
A. N
1. (= evening) → anochecer m, crepúsculo m; (= morning) → madrugada f
at twilightal anochecer
in the twilighta media luz
2. (fig) → crepúsculo m, ocaso m
B. CPD twilight area N = twilight zone twilight sleep Nsueño m crepuscular
a twilight world Nun mundo crepuscular
twilight zone Nzona f gris

twilight

[ˈtwaɪlaɪt]
n
(= dusk) → crépuscule m
in the twilight → dans la pénombre
(fig) the twilight of sth (career)la fin de qch; (life, civilization, empire)le crépuscule de qch
in the twilight of his life → au crépuscule de sa vie
modif (= final) [years] → dernier/ère twilight hourstwilight hours n (= dusk) → crépuscule m
during twilight hours → au crépuscule

twilight

n (= time)Dämmerung f; (= semi-darkness also)Dämmer- or Zwielicht nt; at twilightin der Dämmerung; the twilight of the godsdie Götterdämmerung; the twilight of western civilizationder Herbst der westlichen Zivilisation (liter); the twilight of his life, his twilight yearssein Lebensabend m

twilight

:
twilight sleep
n (Med) → Dämmerschlaf m
twilight world
nWelt fdes Zwielichts
twilight zone
nZwielicht nt

twilight

[ˈtwaɪˌlaɪt] n (evening, also) (fig) → crepuscolo; (morning) → alba
at twilight → al crepuscolo, all'alba
in the twilight → nella penombra

twilight

(ˈtwailait) noun
1. (the time of) the dim light just before the sun rises or just after it sets.
2. the time when the full strength or power of something is decreasing. in the twilight of his life.

twi·light

n. crepúsculo;
___ sleepsueño crepuscular;
___ stateestado de somnolencia.
References in classic literature ?
As young readers like to know `how people look', we will take this moment to give them a little sketch of the four sisters, who sat knitting away in the twilight, while the December snow fell quietly without, and the fire crackled cheerfully within.
The road from the north curved a little to the east just there, and the road from the west swung out a little to the south; so that the grave, with its tall red grass that was never mowed, was like a little island; and at twilight, under a new moon or the clear evening star, the dusty roads used to look like soft grey rivers flowing past it.
The scene of this tale was in the 42d degree of latitude, where the twilight is never of long continuation.
At night in any kind of light, in twilight, candle light, lamplight, and worst of all by moonlight, it becomes bars
Owing to the projection of the upper story--and still more to the thick shadow of the Pyncheon Elm, which stood almost directly in front of the gable--the twilight, here, was still as much akin to night as morning.
She bore in her arms a child, a baby of some three months old, who winked and turned aside its little face from the too vivid light of day; because its existence, heretofore, had brought it acquaintance only with the grey twilight of a dungeon, or other darksome apartment of the prison.
The whole neighborhood abounds with local tales, haunted spots, and twilight superstitions; stars shoot and meteors glare oftener across the valley than in any other part of the country, and the nightmare, with her whole ninefold, seems to make it the favorite scene of her gambols.
It produced in me, this figure, in the clear twilight, I remember, two distinct gasps of emotion, which were, sharply, the shock of my first and that of my second surprise.
cried a voice, whose owner at the same time coming close behind us, laid a hand upon both our shoulders, and then insinuating himself between us, stood stooping forward a little, in the uncertain twilight, strangely peering from Queequeg to me.
So far gone am I in the dark side of earth, that its other side, the theoretic bright one, seems but uncertain twilight to me.
We were coming home at a good smart pace, about twilight.
All the sordid suggestions of the place were gone--in the twilight it was a vision of power.