twine

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twine

 (twīn)
v. twined, twin·ing, twines
v.tr.
1. To twist together (threads, for example); intertwine.
2. To form by twisting, intertwining, or interlacing: twined the cord from plant fibers.
3. To encircle or coil about: a vine twining a tree.
4. To wind, coil, or wrap around something: "She was twining a wisp of hair very slowly around her fingers" (Anne Tyler).
v.intr.
1. To become twisted, interlaced, or interwoven: The branches of one tree twined with those of another.
2. To go in a winding course; twist about: a stream twining through the forest.
3. To wind or coil about something: morning glories twining about stakes.
n.
1. A strong string or cord made of two or more threads twisted together.
2. Something formed by twining: a twine of leaves.

[Middle English twinen, from twin, twine, from Old English twīn, double thread; see dwo- in Indo-European roots.]

twin′er n.

twine

(twaɪn)
n
1. (Textiles) string made by twisting together fibres of hemp, cotton, etc
2. the act or an instance of twining
3. something produced or characterized by twining
4. a twist, coil, or convolution
5. a knot, tangle, or snarl
vb
6. (tr) to twist together; interweave: she twined the wicker to make a basket.
7. (tr) to form by or as if by twining: to twine a garland.
8. (when: intr, often foll by around) to wind or cause to wind, esp in spirals: the creeper twines around the tree.
[Old English twīn; related to Old Frisian twīne, Dutch twijn twine, Lithuanian dvynu twins; see twin]
ˈtwiner n

twine

(twaɪn)

n., v. twined, twin•ing. n.
1. a strong thread or string composed of two or more strands twisted together.
2. an act of twining, twisting, or interweaving.
3. a coiled or twisted object or part; convolution.
4. a twist or turn in anything.
5. a knot or tangle.
v.t.
6. to twist together; interweave.
7. to form by or as if by twisting together: to twine a wreath.
8. to twist (one strand, thread, or the like) with another; interlace.
9. to insert with a twisting or winding motion (usu. fol. by in or into): He twined his fingers in his hair.
10. to clasp or enfold (something) around something else; place by or as if by winding (usu. fol. by about, around, etc.).
11. to wreathe or wrap: They twined the arch with flowers.
v.i.
12. to wind about something; twist itself in spirals (usu. fol. by about, around, etc.).
13. to wind in a sinuous or meandering course.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English twīn (n.) literally, a double or twisted thread, c. Dutch twijn; akin to twin]

twine


Past participle: twined
Gerund: twining

Imperative
twine
twine
Present
I twine
you twine
he/she/it twines
we twine
you twine
they twine
Preterite
I twined
you twined
he/she/it twined
we twined
you twined
they twined
Present Continuous
I am twining
you are twining
he/she/it is twining
we are twining
you are twining
they are twining
Present Perfect
I have twined
you have twined
he/she/it has twined
we have twined
you have twined
they have twined
Past Continuous
I was twining
you were twining
he/she/it was twining
we were twining
you were twining
they were twining
Past Perfect
I had twined
you had twined
he/she/it had twined
we had twined
you had twined
they had twined
Future
I will twine
you will twine
he/she/it will twine
we will twine
you will twine
they will twine
Future Perfect
I will have twined
you will have twined
he/she/it will have twined
we will have twined
you will have twined
they will have twined
Future Continuous
I will be twining
you will be twining
he/she/it will be twining
we will be twining
you will be twining
they will be twining
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been twining
you have been twining
he/she/it has been twining
we have been twining
you have been twining
they have been twining
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been twining
you will have been twining
he/she/it will have been twining
we will have been twining
you will have been twining
they will have been twining
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been twining
you had been twining
he/she/it had been twining
we had been twining
you had been twining
they had been twining
Conditional
I would twine
you would twine
he/she/it would twine
we would twine
you would twine
they would twine
Past Conditional
I would have twined
you would have twined
he/she/it would have twined
we would have twined
you would have twined
they would have twined
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.twine - a lightweight cordtwine - a lightweight cord      
chalk line, snap line, snapline - a chalked string used in the building trades to make a straight line on a vertical surface
cord - a line made of twisted fibers or threads; "the bundle was tied with a cord"
packthread - a strong three-ply twine used to sew or tie packages
Verb1.twine - spin,wind, or twist togethertwine - spin,wind, or twist together; "intertwine the ribbons"; "Twine the threads into a rope"; "intertwined hearts"
distort, twine, twist - form into a spiral shape; "The cord is all twisted"
wreathe, wind - form into a wreath
twine - make by twisting together or intertwining; "twine a rope"
wattle - interlace to form wattle
plash, pleach - interlace the shoots of; "pleach a hedge"
ravel, tangle, knot - tangle or complicate; "a ravelled story"
splice - join by interweaving strands; "Splice the wires"
untwine - undo what has been twined together; "untwine the strings"
2.twine - arrange or or coil around; "roll your hair around your finger"; "Twine the thread around the spool"; "She wrapped her arms around the child"
spool - wind onto a spool or a reel
reel - wind onto or off a reel
ball - form into a ball by winding or rolling; "ball wool"
clew, clue - roll into a ball
coil, curl, loop - wind around something in coils or loops
move, displace - cause to move or shift into a new position or place, both in a concrete and in an abstract sense; "Move those boxes into the corner, please"; "I'm moving my money to another bank"; "The director moved more responsibilities onto his new assistant"
3.twine - make by twisting together or intertwiningtwine - make by twisting together or intertwining; "twine a rope"
interlace, intertwine, lace, twine, enlace, entwine - spin,wind, or twist together; "intertwine the ribbons"; "Twine the threads into a rope"; "intertwined hearts"
create, make - make or cause to be or to become; "make a mess in one's office"; "create a furor"
4.twine - form into a spiral shapetwine - form into a spiral shape; "The cord is all twisted"
change form, change shape, deform - assume a different shape or form
wring, wrench - twist and compress, as if in pain or anguish; "Wring one's hand"
contort, wring, deform, distort - twist and press out of shape
mat, entangle, snarl, tangle - twist together or entwine into a confusing mass; "The child entangled the cord"
interlace, intertwine, lace, twine, enlace, entwine - spin,wind, or twist together; "intertwine the ribbons"; "Twine the threads into a rope"; "intertwined hearts"
spin - work natural fibers into a thread; "spin silk"
interweave, weave - interlace by or as if by weaving

twine

noun
1. string, cord, yarn, strong thread a ball of twine
verb
1. twist together, weave, knit, braid, splice, interweave, plait, entwine, interlace, twist He twined his fingers into hers.
2. coil, wind, surround, bend, wrap, twist, curl, loop, spiral, meander, encircle, wreathe These strands of molecules twine around each other.

twine

verb
To move or proceed on a repeatedly curving course:
Translations
مِصّيص، خَيْط من القُنَّبيَفْتِل، يَجْدِل، يَلْتَف
motouzvinout se
sejlgarnsno sig
snæri, garnvefja utan um
apvītauklasavītvīties
motúzvinúť sa

twine

[twaɪn]
A. Nbramante m
B. VT [+ fingers] → entrelazar; [+ several strings, strands etc together] → trenzar; [+ one string, strand etc around sth] → enroscar, enrollar
she twined the string round her fingerenroscó or enrolló la cuerda en el dedo
to twine one's arms round sbabrazar a algn
C. VI [spiral, plant] → enroscarse; [fingers] → entrelazarse; [road] → serpentear

twine

[ˈtwaɪn]
nficelle f
vi [plant] → s'enroulertwin-engined [ˌtwɪnˈɛndʒɪnd] adjbimoteur f inv
twin-engined aircraft → bimoteur m

twine

nSchnur f, → Bindfaden m
vtwinden; to twine one’s arms (a)round somebodyseine Arme um jdn schlingen
vi (→ um +acc) → sich winden; (plants also)sich ranken

twine

[twaɪn]
1. ncordicella, spago
2. vtintrecciare
3. vi (plant) → attorcigliarsi

twine

(twain) noun
a strong kind of string made of twisted threads. He tied the parcel with twine.
verb
(negative untwine) to twist. The ivy twined round the tree.
References in classic literature ?
Twines not of them one golden thread, But for its sake a Paynim bled.
I liked you very well, Alan, but your ways are not mine, and they're not God's: and the short and the long of it is just that we must twine.
I will hardly twine from ye, David, without some kind of reason for the same," said Alan, mighty gravely.
Before day-dawn, Judge Thatcher and the handful of searchers with him were tracked out, in the cave, by the twine clews they had strung behind them, and informed of the great news.
In the training Dag Daughtry used balls of paper tied about with twine.
Now and then he stooped to pick up a patch, or save an end of tarred twine, which otherwise might have been wasted.
To and fro I paced before this skeleton --brushed the vines aside --broke through the ribs --and with a ball of Arsacidean twine, wandered, eddied long amid its many winding, shaded collonades and arbors.
But this evening, he had no sooner ingeniously knotted his string fast round his bit of pork, twisted the string according to rule over his door-key, passed it through the handle, and made it fast on the hanger, than he remembered that a piece of very fine twine was indispensable to his "setting up" a new piece of work in his loom early in the morning.
And the birch rustled its leaves, and said: 'I have served you longer than I can say, and you never tied a bit of twine even round my branches; and the dear children bound them up with their brightest ribbons.
It is strange how inanimate objects will twine themselves into our affections, especially in the hour of affliction.
Then does she twirl and twine, a pastoral nymph of good family, through the mazes of the dance.
If any one approached them these curious trees would bend down their branches, twine them around the intruders, and hurl them away.