twisting


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twist

 (twĭst)
v. twist·ed, twist·ing, twists
v.tr.
1.
a. To wind together (two or more threads, for example) so as to produce a single strand.
b. To form in this manner: twist a length of rope from strands of hemp.
2. To wind or coil (vines or rope, for example) about something.
3. To interlock or interlace: twist flowers in one's hair.
4. To make (one's way) in a tortuous manner: twisted my way through the briar patch.
5. To cause to rotate or turn in another direction: twisted their heads around at the sound of the doorbell.
6. To impart a spiral or coiling shape to, as by turning the ends in opposite directions: twisting wire into a loop.
7.
a. To turn or open by turning: twisted off the bottle cap.
b. To pull, break, or snap by turning: twist off a dead branch.
8. To wrench or sprain: twist one's wrist.
9. To alter the normal aspect of; contort: twist one's mouth into a wry smile.
10. To alter or distort the intended meaning of: The cross-examiner twisted the words of the witness. See Synonyms at distort.
11. To alter or distort the mental, moral, or emotional character of: The trauma twisted the child's outlook.
v.intr.
1. To be or become twisted.
2. To move or progress in a winding course; meander: The river twisted toward the sea.
3. To squirm; writhe: twist with pain.
4. To rotate or turn in another direction: The owl's head twisted around toward me.
5. To dance the twist.
n.
1. Something twisted or formed by twisting, especially:
a. A length of yarn, cord, or thread, especially a strong silk thread used mainly to bind the edges of buttonholes.
b. Tobacco leaves processed into the form of a rope or roll.
c. A loaf of bread or other bakery product made from pieces of dough twisted together.
d. A sliver of citrus peel twisted over or dropped into a beverage for flavoring.
2. A spin, twirl, or rotation.
3. Sports
a. A complete rotation of the body around its vertical axis, as in diving and gymnastics.
b. A spinning motion given to a ball when thrown or struck in a specific way.
4.
a. The state of being twisted into a spiral; torsional stress or strain.
b. The degree or angle of torsional stress.
5.
a. A contortion or distortion of the body, especially the face.
b. A distortion of meaning: gave my words a misleading twist.
6. A sprain or wrench, as of an ankle.
7. A change in direction; a turn: a sharp twist in the path.
8. An unexpected change in a process or a departure from a pattern, often producing a distortion or perversion: a twist of fate; a story with a quirky twist.
9. A personal inclination or eccentricity; a penchant or flaw: an odd twist to his character.
10. A dance characterized by vigorous gyrations of the hips and arms.
Phrasal Verb:
twist off
To remove by twisting.
Idioms:
leave to twist/leave twisting in the wind
To abandon (someone) to a bad situation, often as a recipient of blame: "If our envoy was so blameless, why had she been left to twist in the wind?" (William Safire).
twist (someone's) arm Slang
To pressure or coerce: If you twist my arm, I'll stay for a second beer.

[Middle English twisten, to squeeze, be divided, from twist, a divided object, fork, rope, from Old English -twist; see dwo- in Indo-European roots.]

twist′a·bil′i·ty n.
twist′a·ble adj.
twist′ing·ly adv.
twist′y adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.twisting - the act of distorting something so it seems to mean something it was not intended to mean
falsification, misrepresentation - a willful perversion of facts
2.twisting - the act of rotating rapidlytwisting - the act of rotating rapidly; "he gave the crank a spin"; "it broke off after much twisting"
rotary motion, rotation - the act of rotating as if on an axis; "the rotation of the dancer kept time with the music"
pirouette - (ballet) a rapid spin of the body (especially on the toes as in ballet)
birling, logrolling - rotating a log rapidly in the water (as a competitive sport)
Adj.1.twisting - marked by repeated turns and bendstwisting - marked by repeated turns and bends; "a tortuous road up the mountain"; "winding roads are full of surprises"; "had to steer the car down a twisty track"
crooked - having or marked by bends or angles; not straight or aligned; "crooked country roads"; "crooked teeth"
Translations

twisting

[ˈtwɪstɪŋ]
A. N (gen) → retorcimiento m; [of meaning, words] → tergiversación f
B. ADJ [lane, street] → con recodos or revueltas; [staircase] → de caracol

twisting

[ˈtwɪstɪŋ]
1. adj (path) → serpeggiante
2. n (of body) → torsioni fpl; (of meaning) → travisamento
References in classic literature ?
That evening while Meg was writing to her father to report the traveler's safe arrival, Jo slipped upstairs into Beth's room, and finding her mother in her usual place, stood a minute twisting her fingers in her hair, with a worried gesture and an undecided look.
Do the Delawares crawl upon those they love like snakes, twisting themselves to strike?
Its limbs were gnarled and fantastic, large enough to form trunks for ordinary trees, twisting down almost to the earth, and rising again into the air.
Kill-e, cried Queequeg, twisting his tattooed face into an unearthly expression of disdain, ah
All of this Ona sat watching, from a corner of the room, twisting her hands together, meantime, in a fever of fright.
Reed looked frightened; her work had slipped from her knee; she was lifting up her hands, rocking herself to and fro, and even twisting her face as if she would cry.
I think you belie her,' said Heathcliff, twisting his chair to face them.
When she went out and closed the door, Mary could only stand waiting, a plain little thing, twisting her thin hands together.
His hands had the same wandering habit as his eyes; they were constantly changing from one position to another, constantly twisting and turning any little stray thing they could pick up.
When Scrooge's nephew laughed in this way: holding his sides, rolling his head, and twisting his face into the most extravagant contortions: Scrooge's niece, by marriage, laughed as heartily as he.
At last I rose to go to bed, much to the relief of the sleepy waiter, who had got the fidgets in his legs, and was twisting them, and hitting them, and putting them through all kinds of contortions in his small pantry.
I got rid of my injured feelings for the time, by kicking them into the brewery wall, and twisting them out of my hair, and then I smoothed my face with my sleeve, and came from behind the gate.