two-stroke

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Related to two-strokes: 2 cycle engine, Two stroke cycle

two-stroke

adj
(Automotive Engineering) relating to or designating an internal-combustion engine whose piston makes two strokes for every explosion. US and Canadian word: two-cycle Compare four-stroke
Translations

two-stroke

[ˈtuːˈstrəʊk]
A. N (= engine) → motor m de dos tiempos
B. ADJ [engine] → de dos tiempos
two-stroke oilaceite m para motores de dos tiempos

two-stroke

[ˈtuːˌstrəʊk]
1. n (engine) → due tempi m inv
2. adja due tempi
References in periodicals archive ?
According to a survey, at present, nearly 4,000 rickshaws are running in the city and among these, more than 1,000 rickshaws are two-strokes, more than 2,000 are four-stroke and the number is being increased with the passing of days.
Due to this distinction, two-strokes are more powerful but consume more fuel and are more polluting also.
Current, new-technology, direct injection two-stroke engines reduce hydrocarbon emissions by as much as 80 percent from the emissions produced by conventional two-strokes that are characterized in "Oil in the Sea.
But what if the regulations get tighter, won't two-strokes be at a disadvantage because of their propensity to burn oil?
In fact, he says, two-strokes account for about 75% of all recreational engines, but account for far more than their share in spills.
The flamboyant Italian said: "It is the first time that the new four-stroke machines have met head on with the two-strokes like the ones I raced last year and I am still leading the way.
Furthermore, two-strokes expel 25-30 percent of their fuel unburned to the water.
We do two-strokes because we believe there is still a large market for them where high power density is required and weight is an issue," said Jim Davey, 2si's president and general manager.
In order to preserve its famous clarity, California's Lake Tahoe is banning two-strokes effective June 1999.
Two-strokes run on a mix of motor oil and gasoline, discharging as much as one-third of their fuel -- unburned -- into the water and air.