twofoldness

twofoldness

(ˈtuːˌfəʊldnəs)
n
the quality or state of being twofold
References in periodicals archive ?
Brogan, Heidegger and Aristotle: The Twofoldness of Being, (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2005), 11-12).
Tate's need for the above connection gives rise to the twofoldness of Kuhn's approach; which is evident in the title and subtitle of the book.
One would do better to read William McNeill (The Glance of the Eye: Heidegger, Aristotle, and the Ends of Theory, SUNY Press 1999) or Walter Brogan (Heidegger and Aristotle: The Twofoldness of Being, SUNY Press 2005).
Early in his ministry he had read The Twofoldness of Divine Truth, (20) a book that bridged the opposing poles of hyper-Calvinism and Holiness.
In this mysterious twofoldness of the inner life it was felt that Stevenson, like St Paul before him, had exposed the root of all our moral difficulties.
In essence, he tries to understand twofoldness as a consequence of the fact that, on the right account of what it Is to be an object of perception, seeing a picture involves two such objects, at different stages in the causal chain--the surface before the viewer and the object from which comes the information that surface embodies (Ch.
Though the twofoldness of self-reflection is the condition of having a "self" and of possessing the special kind of freedom that Heidegger delineates when he calls us the only beings "whose Being is an issue for us," this split within the self is the source of perils peculiar to human existence: the threat of anxiety when we are deeply uncertain about what our standards should be, and the sting of unhappiness, guilt, and even despair when we judge ourselves unfavorably from the distance of our wishes, aspirations, and approvals.
See particularly Franco Volpi's Heidegger e Aristotele (Padua: Daphne Editrice, 1984), Theodore Sadler's Heidegger and Aristotle: The Question of Being (London: Athlone Press, 1996), William McNeill's The Glance of the Eye: Heidegger, Aristotle, and the Ends of Theory (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1999), Catriona Hanley's Being and God in Aristotle and Heidegger (Maryland: Rowan and Littlefield, 2000), Charlotta Weigelt's The Logic of Life: Heidegger's Retrieval of Logos (Stockholm: Almquist and Wiksell International, 2002), and Walter Brogan's Heidegger and Aristotle: The Twofoldness of Being (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2005).
WOLLHEIM twofoldness marked surface depicted subject
19), and it introduces the twofoldness of being central to Heidegger's interpretation of Aristotle.
exploits twofoldness to build up analogies and correspondences between the medium and the object of representation [but he] cannot be thought content to leave the two visual experiences in such a way that one merely floats above the other.
So, seeing-in has a characteristic Wollheim refers to as twofoldness (AO, pp.