typhoon

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Related to typhonic: typhonian

ty·phoon

 (tī-fo͞on′)
n.
A tropical cyclone occurring in the western Pacific or Indian Oceans.

[Alteration (influenced by Chinese terms for typhoons, perhaps Cantonese toi2fung1, typhoon, and kindred terms) of earlier English tuffon, tufan, deluge, from Hindi and Urdu tūfān, storm of wind and rain, flood, from Arabic ṭūfān, deluge, from Greek tuphōn, Typhon, whirlwind.]

typhoon

(taɪˈfuːn)
n
1. (Physical Geography) a violent tropical storm or cyclone, esp in the China seas and W Pacific
2. (Physical Geography) a violent storm of India
[C16: from Chinese tai fung great wind, from tai great + fung wind; influenced by Greek tuphōn whirlwind]
typhonic adj

ty•phoon

(taɪˈfun)

n.
1. a tropical cyclone or hurricane of the W Pacific area and the China seas.
2. a violent storm or tempest of India.
[1690–1700; < dial. Chinese (Guangdong) daaih-fùng (akin to Chinese dàfēng great wind), altered by association with Greek tȳphôn violent wind]

ty·phoon

(tī-fo͞on′)
A hurricane occurring in the western Pacific Ocean. See Note at cyclone.

typhoon

a cyclone or hurricane in the western Pacific Ocean.
See also: Wind

typhoon

An intense cyclone in the China Sea where the spiraling wind-speed reaches over 100 miles (160km) per hour.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.typhoon - a tropical cyclone occurring in the western Pacific or Indian oceanstyphoon - a tropical cyclone occurring in the western Pacific or Indian oceans
cyclone - a violent rotating windstorm

typhoon

noun storm, tornado, cyclone, tempest, squall, tropical storm She had to endure being in a typhoon for 67 hours.
Translations
إعْصار
tajfun
tyfon
tájfun
fellibylur
taifūnas
taifūns
tajfún
şiddetli kasırgatayfun

typhoon

[taɪˈfuːn] Ntifón m

typhoon

[taɪˈfuːn] ntyphon m

typhoon

nTaifun m

typhoon

[taɪˈfuːn] ntifone m

typhoon

(taiˈfuːn) noun
a violent sea-storm occurring in the East. They were caught in a typhoon in the China seas.
References in periodicals archive ?
The duality of his Typhonic example would seem to telegraph the striking duality of the rational/irrational halves of the soul which these horses represent.
He fears that in being Typhonic he is no single self, but multiple selves, a hundred selves, each speaking in his own voice, simultaneously, making a din of identity.
In the new dream, however, in the centre of his typhonic emotional welling is neither he nor his male alter over whom he exercises control but his dead wife.