typology

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ty·pol·o·gy

 (tī-pŏl′ə-jē)
n. pl. ty·pol·o·gies
1. The study or systematic classification of types that have characteristics or traits in common.
2. A theory or doctrine of types, as in scriptural studies.

ty′po·log′i·cal (tī′pə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl), ty′po·log′ic (-lŏj′ĭk) adj.
ty′po·log′i·cal·ly adv.
ty·pol′o·gist n.

typology

(taɪˈpɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Theology) chiefly Christian theol the doctrine or study of types or of the correspondence between them and the realities which they typify
typological, ˌtypoˈlogic adj
ˌtypoˈlogically adv
tyˈpologist n

ty•pol•o•gy

(taɪˈpɒl ə dʒi)

n.
1. the study of types or prefigurative symbols in scriptural literature.
2. a systematic classification or study of types.
3. symbolism.
4. the study and classification of languages according to structural features, without reference to their histories.
[1835–45]
ty•pol′o•gist, n.

typology

the analysis of symbolism, especially of the meaning of Scripture types. — typologist, n.typological, adj.
See also: Bible
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.typology - classification according to general type
classification, compartmentalisation, compartmentalization, assortment, categorisation, categorization - the act of distributing things into classes or categories of the same type
Translations

typology

[taɪˈpɒlədʒɪ] Ntipología f

typology

nTypologie f

typology

[taɪˈpɒlədʒɪ] ntipologia
References in periodicals archive ?
Rollston, "The Dating of the Early Royal Byblian Phoenician Inscriptions: A Response to Benjamin Sass," Maaruv 15 [2008]: 57-93); (2) though the Biblian texts are of undoubted importance, the basic problem is that their dating is not fixed archaeologically--but down-dating these texts would seem to entail, on the part of a typologist, a parallel down-dating of the entire early Northwest Semitic corpus of inscriptions in scripts that are supposed to have been borrowed from the Phoenician (Aramaic, Hebrew, Moabite .
This may in part be due to the effects of Susan Sontag's argument, in On Photography, that Arbus is essentially a manipulative typologist of the varieties of human misery: Making a careful case and backing it up with her clout, Sontag set the course of the conversation for decades to come.
This contradiction has created confusion for a comparativistl typologist reader and researcher as well.
One reason why Emerson seems so widely applicable is that he was a quite deliberate typologist (21) who was continually looking for the connectedness of things, whether through his life-long habit of "reading for lustres" or through his belief in a primal or "first philosophy" that was a convergence of the thought of the world's great thinkers or prisci theologii, (22) from the mythological Hermes Trismegisthus to Plato and the Neoplatonists, and especially the great Renaissance thinkers like Milton who believed in such syncretism.
Believing in a stable system of typification makes you neither an essentialist nor a typologist.
The first chapter defines auxiliaries and auxiliary verb constructions, thereby pointing out the gradient nature of the phenomenon and the corresponding difficulties that await the typologist in identifying and classifying a given complex verb construction.
Here he adopts a broad racial typology that was formulated in the eighteenth century by the eminent Swedish botanist and typologist Carl Linnaeus (Beresford and Omaji 1998:32).
No experienced typologist has difficulty in distinguishing lunates, trapeze-rectangles, and triangles except for the rare, odd specimen.
A good typologist, on the other hand, will also show thorough expertise in a number of individual philologies.
Since clauses like the phonetician gave the book or the typologist gave to the boy are marginal in English (although possible under the right pragmatic conditions), while the likes of I bought a book and I took the book are perfectly fine, English seems to give more prominence to the number of participants (rather than semantic roles) in the encoding of three-participant events.