tyranny


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tyr·an·ny

 (tĭr′ə-nē)
n. pl. tyr·an·nies
1. Unjust or oppressive governmental power: "He tended to see the Crown as the benign center of the empire and Parliament as the malevolent source of tyranny" (Gordon S. Wood).
2. A government in which a single ruler is vested with absolute power: people liberated from a brutal tyranny.
3. The office, authority, or jurisdiction of an absolute ruler: Pisistratus held the tyranny of Athens.
4.
a. The oppressive or unjust use of power: parental tyranny.
b. A tyrannical act: refused to submit to her husband's tyrannies.
5. An oppressive or harshly limiting condition: the tyranny of social expectations.

[Middle English tyrannie, from Old French, from Late Latin tyrannia, from Greek turanniā, from turannos, tyrant.]

tyranny

(ˈtɪrənɪ)
n, pl -nies
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy)
a. government by a tyrant or tyrants; despotism
b. similarly oppressive and unjust government by more than one person
2. arbitrary, unreasonable, or despotic behaviour or use of authority: the teacher's tyranny.
3. any harsh discipline or oppression: the tyranny of the clock.
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a political unit ruled by a tyrant
5. (Historical Terms) (esp in ancient Greece) government by a usurper
6. a tyrannical act
[C14: from Old French tyrannie, from Medieval Latin tyrannia, from Latin tyrannus tyrant]
ˈtyrannous adj
ˈtyrannously adv
ˈtyrannousness n

tyr•an•ny

(ˈtɪr ə ni)

n., pl. -nies.
1. arbitrary or unrestrained exercise of power; despotic abuse of authority.
2. the government or rule of a tyrant.
3. a state ruled by a tyrant.
4. oppressive or unjust government.
5. undue severity or harshness.
6. a tyrannical act.
[1325–75; < Old French < Medieval Latin tyrannia= Latin tyrann(us) tyrant + -ia -y3]

tyranny

A form of government in which a single ruler holds absolute power.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tyranny - a form of government in which the ruler is an absolute dictator (not restricted by a constitution or laws or opposition etc.)tyranny - a form of government in which the ruler is an absolute dictator (not restricted by a constitution or laws or opposition etc.)
autocracy, autarchy - a political system governed by a single individual
police state - a country that maintains repressive control over the people by means of police (especially secret police)
2.tyranny - dominance through threat of punishment and violencetyranny - dominance through threat of punishment and violence
ascendance, ascendancy, ascendence, ascendency, dominance, control - the state that exists when one person or group has power over another; "her apparent dominance of her husband was really her attempt to make him pay attention to her"

tyranny

noun oppression, cruelty, dictatorship, authoritarianism, reign of terror, despotism, autocracy, absolutism, coercion, high-handedness, harsh discipline, unreasonableness, imperiousness, peremptoriness I'm the sole victim of her tyranny.
understanding, democracy, ease, mercy, relaxation, tolerance, leniency, laxity, liberality
Quotations
"Tyranny is always better organised than freedom" [Charles Péguy Basic Verities]

tyranny

noun
1. A government in which a single leader or party exercises absolute control over all citizens and every aspect of their lives:
2. Absolute power, especially when exercised unjustly or cruelly:
Translations
حُكْم الطُّغْيان، حُكْم إسْتِبدادي
tyranie
tyranni
türannia
tiranija
zsarnokság
harîstjórn
tyrania
tiranijaтиранија

tyranny

[ˈtɪrənɪ] N (lit, fig) → tiranía f

tyranny

[ˈtɪrəni] ntyrannie f

tyranny

n (lit, fig)Tyrannei f, → Tyrannenherrschaft f; he ruled by tyrannyer führte eine Tyrannenherrschaft

tyranny

[ˈtɪrənɪ] ntirannia

tyrant

(ˈtairənt) noun
a cruel and unjust ruler. The people suffered under foreign tyrants.
tyrannical (tiˈrӕnikəl) adjective , tyrannous (ˈtirənəs)
of or like a tyrant. a tyrannical ruler; His actions were tyrannous.
tyˈrannically, ˈtyrannously adverb
tyrannize, tyrannise (ˈti-) verb
to rule or treat (a person or people) cruelly and unjustly. He tyrannizes his family.
ˈtyranny (ˈti-) noun
an action, or the method of ruling, of a tyrant. People will always resist tyranny.
References in classic literature ?
Last of all comes the most beautiful of all, man and State alike, tyranny and the tyrant; these we have now to consider.
Say then, my friend, in what manner does tyranny arise?
So in like manner, if anything is done by those who have the management of public affairs where a democracy is established, their actions are to be considered as the actions of the state, as well as in the oligarchy or tyranny.
My children," said the Oldest and Wisest Ape in All the World, when he had heard the Deputation, "you did right in ridding yourselves of tyranny, but your tribe is not sufficiently advanced to dispense with the forms of monarchy.
The history of the present King of Great Britain is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations, all having in direct object the establishment of an absolute Tyranny over these States.
He is at this time transporting large armies of foreign mercenaries to compleat the works of death, desolation and tyranny, already begun with circumstances of Cruelty & perfidy scarcely paralleled in the most barbarous ages, and totally unworthy of the Head of a civilized nation.
A more complete imagination than Philip's might have pictured a youth of splendid hope, for he must have been entering upon manhood in 1848 when kings, remembering their brother of France, went about with an uneasy crick in their necks; and perhaps that passion for liberty which passed through Europe, sweeping before it what of absolutism and tyranny had reared its head during the reaction from the revolution of 1789, filled no breast with a hotter fire.
The simplicity of the imprudent man was suddenly abused; and so he passed his time with them certain days, which he did in Maybole with Thomas Kennedie, uncle to the said Earl: after which the said Mr Allan passed, with quiet company, to visit the place and bounds of Crossraguel, [his abbacy,] of which the said Earl being surely advertised, determined to put in practice the tyranny which long before he had conceaved.
Some of the cities fell under the tyranny of Macedonian garrisons; others under that of usurpers springing out of their own confusions.
A multitude, by various avenues, assembled in King Street, which was destined to be the scene, nearly a century afterwards, of another encounter between the troops of Britain, and a people struggling against her tyranny.
I am no storyteller, and love as it is cannot be portrayed in a literature dominated and enthralled by the debasing tyranny which "sentences letters" in the name of the Young Girl.
They dispose kings to tyranny, husbands to jealousy, wise men to irresolution and melancholy.