tyranny


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tyr·an·ny

 (tĭr′ə-nē)
n. pl. tyr·an·nies
1. Unjust or oppressive governmental power: "He tended to see the Crown as the benign center of the empire and Parliament as the malevolent source of tyranny" (Gordon S. Wood).
2. A government in which a single ruler is vested with absolute power: people liberated from a brutal tyranny.
3. The office, authority, or jurisdiction of an absolute ruler: Pisistratus held the tyranny of Athens.
4.
a. The oppressive or unjust use of power: parental tyranny.
b. A tyrannical act: refused to submit to her husband's tyrannies.
5. An oppressive or harshly limiting condition: the tyranny of social expectations.

[Middle English tyrannie, from Old French, from Late Latin tyrannia, from Greek turanniā, from turannos, tyrant.]

tyranny

(ˈtɪrənɪ)
n, pl -nies
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy)
a. government by a tyrant or tyrants; despotism
b. similarly oppressive and unjust government by more than one person
2. arbitrary, unreasonable, or despotic behaviour or use of authority: the teacher's tyranny.
3. any harsh discipline or oppression: the tyranny of the clock.
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a political unit ruled by a tyrant
5. (Historical Terms) (esp in ancient Greece) government by a usurper
6. a tyrannical act
[C14: from Old French tyrannie, from Medieval Latin tyrannia, from Latin tyrannus tyrant]
ˈtyrannous adj
ˈtyrannously adv
ˈtyrannousness n

tyr•an•ny

(ˈtɪr ə ni)

n., pl. -nies.
1. arbitrary or unrestrained exercise of power; despotic abuse of authority.
2. the government or rule of a tyrant.
3. a state ruled by a tyrant.
4. oppressive or unjust government.
5. undue severity or harshness.
6. a tyrannical act.
[1325–75; < Old French < Medieval Latin tyrannia= Latin tyrann(us) tyrant + -ia -y3]

tyranny

A form of government in which a single ruler holds absolute power.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tyranny - a form of government in which the ruler is an absolute dictator (not restricted by a constitution or laws or opposition etc.)tyranny - a form of government in which the ruler is an absolute dictator (not restricted by a constitution or laws or opposition etc.)
autocracy, autarchy - a political system governed by a single individual
police state - a country that maintains repressive control over the people by means of police (especially secret police)
2.tyranny - dominance through threat of punishment and violencetyranny - dominance through threat of punishment and violence
ascendance, ascendancy, ascendence, ascendency, dominance, control - the state that exists when one person or group has power over another; "her apparent dominance of her husband was really her attempt to make him pay attention to her"

tyranny

noun oppression, cruelty, dictatorship, authoritarianism, reign of terror, despotism, autocracy, absolutism, coercion, high-handedness, harsh discipline, unreasonableness, imperiousness, peremptoriness I'm the sole victim of her tyranny.
understanding, democracy, ease, mercy, relaxation, tolerance, leniency, laxity, liberality
Quotations
"Tyranny is always better organised than freedom" [Charles Péguy Basic Verities]

tyranny

noun
1. A government in which a single leader or party exercises absolute control over all citizens and every aspect of their lives:
2. Absolute power, especially when exercised unjustly or cruelly:
Translations
حُكْم الطُّغْيان، حُكْم إسْتِبدادي
tyranie
tyranni
türannia
tiranija
zsarnokság
harîstjórn
tyrania
tiranijaтиранија

tyranny

[ˈtɪrənɪ] N (lit, fig) → tiranía f

tyranny

[ˈtɪrəni] ntyrannie f

tyranny

n (lit, fig)Tyrannei f, → Tyrannenherrschaft f; he ruled by tyrannyer führte eine Tyrannenherrschaft

tyranny

[ˈtɪrənɪ] ntirannia

tyrant

(ˈtairənt) noun
a cruel and unjust ruler. The people suffered under foreign tyrants.
tyrannical (tiˈrӕnikəl) adjective , tyrannous (ˈtirənəs)
of or like a tyrant. a tyrannical ruler; His actions were tyrannous.
tyˈrannically, ˈtyrannously adverb
tyrannize, tyrannise (ˈti-) verb
to rule or treat (a person or people) cruelly and unjustly. He tyrannizes his family.
ˈtyranny (ˈti-) noun
an action, or the method of ruling, of a tyrant. People will always resist tyranny.
References in classic literature ?
This guarded mode of existence was like living under a tyranny.
What was any tyranny of prison compared with the tyranny of the past, of the thing that had happened and could not be recalled, of the memory that could never be effaced
All men recognize the right of revolution; that is, the right to refuse allegiance to, and to resist, the government, when its tyranny or its inefficiency are great and unendurable.
combine' will be the other way, and then how these fine people's posterity will fume and fret and grit their teeth over the insolent tyranny of trade unions
As the great day approached, all the tyranny that was in him came to the surface; he seemed to take a vin- dictive pleasure in punishing the least shortcomings.
Saint Antoine's blood was up, and the blood of tyranny and domination by the iron hand was down--down on the steps of the Hotel de Ville where the governor's body lay--down on the sole of the shoe of Madame Defarge where she had trodden on the body to steady it for mutilation.
To bow and sue for grace With suppliant knee, and deifie his power Who from the terrour of this Arm so late Doubted his Empire, that were low indeed, That were an ignominy and shame beneath This downfall; since by Fate the strength of Gods And this Empyreal substance cannot fail, Since through experience of this great event In Arms not worse, in foresight much advanc't, We may with more successful hope resolve To wage by force or guile eternal Warr Irreconcileable, to our grand Foe, Who now triumphs, and in th' excess of joy Sole reigning holds the Tyranny of Heav'n.
But the same worthy person, when placed in his own snug parlour, and surrounded by all the comforts of an Englishman's fireside, is not half so much disposed to believe that his own ancestors led a very different life from himself; that the shattered tower, which now forms a vista from his window, once held a baron who would have hung him up at his own door without any form of trial; that the hinds, by whom his little pet-farm is managed, a few centuries ago would have been his slaves; and that the complete influence of feudal tyranny once extended over the neighbouring village, where the attorney is now a man of more importance than the lord of the manor.
Its basis is the tyranny of brain force, which, among civilized men, is allowed to do what muscular force does among schoolboys and savages.
And as it was tyranny in any government to require the first, so it was weakness not to enforce the second: for a man may be allowed to keep poisons in his closet, but not to vend them about for cordials.
The mother snatched away by death, the boy left to solitude and the tyranny of an old and loveless man.
We indulged a melancholy pleasure in reflecting what that great man had achieved for the deliverance of Abyssinia, from the yoke and tyranny of the Moors; the voyages he had undertaken; the battles he had fought; the victories he had won; and the cruel and tragical death he had suffered.