ubiquitarian


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ubiquitarian

(juːˌbɪkwɪˈtɛərɪən)
n
(Theology) a member of the Lutheran church who holds that Christ is no more present in the elements of the Eucharist than elsewhere, as he is present in all places at all times
adj
(Theology) denoting, relating to, or holding this belief
[C17: from Latin ubīque everywhere; see ubiquitous]
uˌbiquiˈtarianˌism n
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References in periodicals archive ?
Similarly, Dufour offers a usefully clear and succinct explanation of the Lutheran ubiquitarian debate (chapter 6), which consumed so much of Beze's polemical energy in the 1560s.
The ubiquitarians (who maintain that the risen Christ is ubiquitous in the same way as His Father and can thus be equally present at all altars simultaneously) therefore err in assuming that in the Eucharist there exists a double sign, namely the external sign of wine and bread and the inner sign of the body and blood of Christ.