udder


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ud·der

 (ŭd′ər)
n.
A baglike organ containing the mammary glands, characteristic of certain female mammals, such as cows, sheep, and goats.

[Middle English, from Old English ūder; see euə-dh-r̥ in Indo-European roots.]

udder

(ˈʌdə)
n
(Zoology) the large baglike mammary gland of cows, sheep, etc, having two or more teats
[Old English ūder; related to Old High German ūtar, Old Norse jūr, Latin ūber, Sanskrit ūdhar]

ud•der

(ˈʌd ər)

n.
a mamma or mammary gland, esp. when baggy and with more than one teat, as in cows.
[before 1000; Middle English uddre, Old English, c. German. Euter, Latin ūber, Greek oûthar, Skt údhar]

ud·der

(ŭd′ər)
A bag-shaped part of a cow and the females of related mammals, in which milk is formed and stored and from which it is taken in suckling or milking.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.udder - mammary gland of bovids (cows and sheep and goats)udder - mammary gland of bovids (cows and sheep and goats)
cow, moo-cow - female of domestic cattle: "`moo-cow' is a child's term"
ewe - female sheep
nanny-goat, she-goat, nanny - female goat
mammary gland, mamma - milk-secreting organ of female mammals
Translations
ضَرْع، ثَدْي البَقَرَه
vemeno
yver
utare
vime
tõgy
júgur
uber
tesmenis
vemeno
inek memesi

udder

[ˈʌdəʳ] Nubre f

udder

[ˈʌdər] n [cow, goat, sheep] → mamelle f (d'un animal)

udder

nEuter nt

udder

[ˈʌdəʳ] nmammella (di animale)

udder

(ˈadə) noun
the bag-like part of a cow, goat etc, with teats that supply milk for their young or for humans. The cow has a diseased udder.

udder

n. ubre, glándula mamaria de la vaca y otros animales mamíferos.
References in classic literature ?
Out of thy poisons brewedst thou balsam for thyself; thy cow, affliction, milkedst thou--now drinketh thou the sweet milk of her udder.
The calf, fumbling, poked her nose under her mother's udder, and stiffened her tail out straight.
A fine brindled cow with a large udder was attached to the cart behind.
He had brought another, a young one, with him, whose udder was filled with milk, which he gave to the little ones, and kissed their lips.
We are all of us born in moral stupidity, taking the world as an udder to feed our supreme selves: Dorothea had early begun to emerge from that stupidity, but yet it had been easier to her to imagine how she would devote herself to Mr.
In five years the Portuguese skimmed the cream and dried up the udder.
Their large-veined udders hung ponderous as sandbags, the teats sticking out like the legs of a gipsy's crock; and as each animal lingered for her turn to arrive the milk oozed forth and fell in drops to the ground.
There were a number of the same vicious wolf-dogs which we had left worrying the dyryth, and many goatlike animals whose distended udders explained the reasons for their presence.
Thus, then, did we wait in great fear of mind till morning came, but when the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, the male sheep hurried out to feed, while the ewes remained bleating about the pens waiting to be milked, for their udders were full to bursting; but their master in spite of all his pain felt the backs of all the sheep as they stood upright, without being sharp enough to find out that the men were underneath their bellies.
He had a trick of pulling the sheet up over his head, as if thus he could shut out the world, but always his father was there to rout him out from this nest and set him none too gently on his feet; always there was a herd to be brought in and udders to be emptied.
The great and inherited development of the udders in cows and goats in countries where they are habitually milked, in comparison with the state of these organs in other countries, is another instance of the effect of use.
The scourge of udder tampering has not escaped the attention of humorist Dave Barry.