ukiyo-e


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ukiyo-e

(ˌuːkiːjəʊˈjeɪ)
n
(Art Terms) a school of Japanese painting depicting subjects from everyday life
[Japanese: pictures of the floating world]
References in periodicals archive ?
Beautifully and profusely illustrated throughout, "Tattoos in Japanese Prints" by Sarah Thompson (Curator of Japanese Art, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston) tells the fascinating story of how ukiyo-e first inspired tattoo artists as the pictorial tradition of tattooing in Japan was just beginning.
Natalya Hughes is best known for works that explore feminism and art history, and borrow from the tradition of Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints.
According to the ministry, passports will include 24 landscapes from the series "36 views of Mount Fuji" by the late 18th to early 19th century ukiyo-e or woodblock artist Katsushika Hokusai.
One of these aspects concerned ukiyo-e and its artists.
Adapted from a woman-made manga ("Sarusuberi") by a female screenwriter, this intriguingly atypical toon eschews such common ingredients as fantastical creatures and schoolboy sexism in favor of the inner dynamics of an early-19th-century artistic family, focusing on ukiyo-e master Katsushika Hokusai's relatively obscure daughter, O-Ei, a painter about whom just enough is known that the film is free to invent the rest.
Islamabad -- Exhibition "Evolving Imagery: Ukiyo-e and Contemporary Prints from Japan" was inaugurated Wednesday here at the premises of the National Art Gallery, Islamabad it will remain open till 25th June.
Often working himself sick, stressing over his attempts to create designs he feels can compete with those of his idols, whether they be tattooers or Ukiyo-e masters.
During the Edo Period (1615-1868), a uniquely Japanese art from developed known as ukiyo-e, or 'pictures of the floating world.
She thanks Haley for donating the Ukiyo-e prints and his Asian art, which can be found around campus, and hopes that others will come to the ASUMH campus to see the beautiful displays.
What those Europeans saw were the Japanese color prints called ukiyo-e ("pictures of the floating world").
Japan asked UNESCO to register Mount Fuji in January 2012 because it has been viewed as a religious site, depicted in ukiyo-e paintings and helped nurture Japan's unique culture.
Working at Goupil's Paris gallery in 1874 gave Van Gogh the opportunity to buy Japanese prints and albums in the ukiyo-e style from Siegfried Bing's shop on the rue de Provence.