ukiyo-e


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ukiyo-e

(ˌuːkiːjəʊˈjeɪ)
n
(Art Terms) a school of Japanese painting depicting subjects from everyday life
[Japanese: pictures of the floating world]
References in periodicals archive ?
In the spring of 1890, Mary Cassatt made multiple visits to the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris to see an exhibition of Japanese prints by Ukiyo-e masters: Hokusai, Hiroshige, Utamaro and others.
announced on June 25 a collaboration with the rock 'n' roll band KISS and their global brand management firm Epic Rights to produce KISS Ukiyo-e, the Japanese traditional woodblock print, as the first feature of the "UKIYO-E PROJECT.
Islamabad -- Exhibition "Evolving Imagery: Ukiyo-e and Contemporary Prints from Japan" was inaugurated Wednesday here at the premises of the National Art Gallery, Islamabad it will remain open till 25th June.
She thanks Haley for donating the Ukiyo-e prints and his Asian art, which can be found around campus, and hopes that others will come to the ASUMH campus to see the beautiful displays.
Japan asked UNESCO to register Mount Fuji in January 2012 because it has been viewed as a religious site, depicted in ukiyo-e paintings and helped nurture Japan's unique culture.
Shepparton Art Museum (SAM) is delighted to announce a major exhibition and Australian exclusive for March 2013, The Golden Age of Colour Prints: Ukiyo-e from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.
Working at Goupil's Paris gallery in 1874 gave Van Gogh the opportunity to buy Japanese prints and albums in the ukiyo-e style from Siegfried Bing's shop on the rue de Provence.
The remaining chapters describe different schools and types of art, including portraiture, the idealizing function of ukiyo-e, and Buddhist art, concluding with the impact of the arrival of Europeans.
Dodiya's works lie between the real and the imagined and she selects her pictorial references from varied sources including Indian miniatures, Renaissance paintings, world cinema, Ukiyo-e prints, and newspaper photographs.
Saleem Peeradina's poetic response to Hiroshige (WLT, November 2009, 29-30) took me back to a delightful discovery of my childhood--another ukiyo-e artist, Hokusai.
Degas, Van Gogh and Toulouse Lautrec all admired the two dimensional imagery of ukiyo-e, its composition and flat areas of bold colours.
If your first impulse is to flash Vania a hefty side-eye, you're not wrong--but a closer read reveals his admiration for ukiyo-e (traditional Japanese woodblocking) and also that while the women are bound, in other ways so are the men, creating a complex, psychosexual fantasia.