umbrage


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Related to umbrage: take umbrage

um·brage

 (ŭm′brĭj)
n.
1. Offense or resentment: "On one occasion her insults had been so brilliant and finely calculated that the groom took umbrage and cancelled the wedding." (Salman Rushdie).
2. Archaic
a. Shadow or shade: "the Red Maple ... with its cool, deep, yet not oppressive umbrage" (Donald Culross Peattie).
b. Trees or foliage affording shade.

[Middle English, shade, from Old French, from Latin umbrāticum, neuter of umbrāticus, of shade, from umbra, shadow.]

umbrage

(ˈʌmbrɪdʒ)
n
1. displeasure or resentment; offence (in the phrase give or take umbrage)
2. the foliage of trees, considered as providing shade
3. rare shadow or shade
4. archaic a shadow or semblance
[C15: from Old French umbrage, from Latin umbrāticus relating to shade, from umbra shade, shadow]

um•brage

(ˈʌm brɪdʒ)

n.
1. offense; displeasure: to take umbrage at someone's rudeness.
2. the slightest feeling of suspicion, doubt, hostility, or the like.
3. leafy shade, as tree foliage.
4. shade or shadows.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Old French; see umbra, -age]

umbrage

- From Latin umbra, "shadow," in English it originally meant "shade, shadow," then shadowy suspicion, and then displeasure or resentment at a slight or insult.
See also related terms for insult.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.umbrage - a feeling of anger caused by being offendedumbrage - a feeling of anger caused by being offended; "he took offence at my question"
anger, ire, choler - a strong emotion; a feeling that is oriented toward some real or supposed grievance

umbrage

noun
take umbrage take offence, be hurt, be angry, be offended, be upset, be wounded, be put out, be annoyed, bridle, be insulted, take exception, be miffed (informal), be indignant, be resentful, be disgruntled, be aggrieved, be affronted, get the hump (Brit. informal), be piqued, be riled (informal), get huffy, go in a huff, take something personally, have your nose put out of joint (informal), take something amiss, get your hackles up He takes umbrage against anyone who criticises him.

umbrage

noun
1. Extreme displeasure caused by an insult or slight:
2. Comparative darkness that results from the blocking of light rays:
Translations

umbrage

[ˈʌmbrɪdʒ] Nresentimiento m
to take umbrage (at sth)ofenderse or quedarse resentido (por algo)

umbrage

[ˈʌmbrɪdʒ] n
to take umbrage → prendre ombrage

umbrage

n to take umbrage at somethingan etw (dat)Anstoß nehmen; he took umbrageer nahm daran Anstoß

umbrage

[ˈʌmbrɪdʒ] n to take umbrage (at sth)adombrarsi (a or per qc), risentirsi (di or per qc)
References in classic literature ?
At length, confused by fright and heat, and doubting whether half London might not by this time be turning out for my apprehension, I left the young man to go where he would with my box and money; and, panting and crying, but never stopping, faced about for Greenwich, which I had understood was on the Dover Road: taking very little more out of the world, towards the retreat of my aunt, Miss Betsey, than I had brought into it, on the night when my arrival gave her so much umbrage.
O might I here In solitude live savage, in some glad Obscur'd, where highest Woods impenetrable To Starr or Sun-light, spread thir umbrage broad, And brown as Evening: Cover me ye Pines, Ye Cedars, with innumerable boughs Hide me, where I may never see them more.
The interfering and unneighborly regulations of some States, contrary to the true spirit of the Union, have, in different instances, given just cause of umbrage and complaint to others, and it is to be feared that examples of this nature, if not restrained by a national control, would be multiplied and extended till they became not less serious sources of animosity and discord than injurious impediments to the intcrcourse between the different parts of the Confederacy.
As it can give no umbrage to the writers against the plan of the federal Constitution, let us suppose, that as they are the most zealous, so they are also the most sagacious, of those who think the late convention were unequal to the task assigned them, and that a wiser and better plan might and ought to be substituted.
If it so happens that there is no fortune large enough to keep open house in this way, the big-wigs of the place choose a place of meeting, as they did at Alencon, in the house of some inoffensive person, whose settled life and character and position offers no umbrage to the vanities or the interests of any one.
Had one suggested that he ever had been aught than the soul of honor and chivalry he would have taken umbrage forthwith.
Vampa took this wild road, which, enclosed between two ridges, and shadowed by the tufted umbrage of the pines, seemed, but for the difficulties of its descent, that path to Avernus of which Virgil speaks.
Firmness, activity, and enterprise, covered with grave foliage, poetic feeling and fervour; but these flowers were still there, preserved pure and dewy under the umbrage of later growth and hardier nature: perhaps I only in the world knew the secret of their existence, but to me they were ever ready to yield an exquisite fragrance and present a beauty as chaste as radiant.
The last object at which Elizabeth gazed when they renewed their journey, after their encountre with Richard, was the sun, as it expanded in the refraction of the horizon, and over whose disk the dark umbrage of a pine was stealing, while it slowly sank behind the western hills.
In what can an intendant, that is to say my subordinate, my clerk, give me umbrage or injure me, even if he is Monsieur Colbert?
I promise you there shall be nothing that could cause him anxiety in our silence, or at which he could take umbrage.
Philander was too much relieved at the happy outcome to their adventure to take umbrage at the professor's cruel fling.